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Thursday, July 27, 2017

Saudi Arabia: How To Check ONLINE If You Have a Criminal Record

In Saudi Arabia, it is not surprising for an expat to discover that there is a criminal record or complaint lodged against him. This is due to the fact that a complained filed against you may actually be due to mistaken identity. Several reasons could be blamed, such as similarities in the names (due to translations) or even clerical error. In the latter case, if a complaint is entered in the government database, a mistake is made in the most important detail about the person - the iqama number. One number is all it takes for you to have a criminal complained or record filed against you. That is why it it important for you to check the Interior Ministry page for criminal records.  Using the (MOI) Ministry of Interior's Electronic Service called Absher, you can check any Criminal Case record on your Iqama number. Here are the steps:  1. Go to the MOI website to login to your Absher account. If you don't have one, create an account first by clicking "New User". You will need a mobile number associated with your account.  2. In the login page, enter you user name, password and the random numbers generated. Click login.  3. You will get a verification code in your mobile phone registered with MOI. Enter the number here in the box provided and click enter.  4. Once you are logged in, go to eServices > MOI Diwan > Generalization Report Query. (See numbers 1-2-3 below.  5. If you are checking for criminal records for the first time, you will get a message description of the service. Just click proceed. The result will be displayed similar to the one below:  6. If your records are clear, you will get the message: "There are no Generalization report registered against you."   7. If you get a report against you, seek advise from your employer or your embassy.  It is best to check for any records lodged against you. While you may have a valid Iqama, it is still possible that there is an erroneous record or criminal complaint filed under your Iqama number. If so, it is best to settle it before you get caught in a checkpoint. Note that, in the video above, Saudi Police and the Jawazat - the Passport Office, are intensifying their crackdown on illegal residents and violators.  Also, if you are planning to go on vacation, or renew your Iqama, it is best to check for records before doing any of these things to make sure you will not have any problem with the Saudi Authorities in the future.




In Saudi Arabia, it is not surprising for an expat to discover that there is a criminal record or complaint lodged against him. This is due to the fact that a complained filed against you may actually be due to mistaken identity. Several reasons could be blamed, such as similarities in the names (due to translations) or even clerical error. In the latter case, if a complaint is entered in the government database, a mistake is made in the most important detail about the person - the iqama number. One number is all it takes for you to have a criminal complained or record filed against you. That is why it it important for you to check the Interior Ministry page for criminal records.

Using the (MOI) Ministry of Interior's Electronic Service called Absher, you can check any Criminal Case record on your Iqama number. Here are the steps:

1. Go to the MOI website to login to your Absher account. If you don't have one, create an account first by clicking "New User". You will need a mobile number associated with your account.
In Saudi Arabia, it is not surprising for an expat to discover that there is a criminal record or complaint lodged against him. This is due to the fact that a complained filed against you may actually be due to mistaken identity. Several reasons could be blamed, such as similarities in the names (due to translations) or even clerical error. In the latter case, if a complaint is entered in the government database, a mistake is made in the most important detail about the person - the iqama number. One number is all it takes for you to have a criminal complained or record filed against you. That is why it it important for you to check the Interior Ministry page for criminal records.  Using the (MOI) Ministry of Interior's Electronic Service called Absher, you can check any Criminal Case record on your Iqama number. Here are the steps:  1. Go to the MOI website to login to your Absher account. If you don't have one, create an account first by clicking "New User". You will need a mobile number associated with your account.  2. In the login page, enter you user name, password and the random numbers generated. Click login.  3. You will get a verification code in your mobile phone registered with MOI. Enter the number here in the box provided and click enter.  4. Once you are logged in, go to eServices > MOI Diwan > Generalization Report Query. (See numbers 1-2-3 below.  5. If you are checking for criminal records for the first time, you will get a message description of the service. Just click proceed. The result will be displayed similar to the one below:  6. If your records are clear, you will get the message: "There are no Generalization report registered against you."   7. If you get a report against you, seek advise from your employer or your embassy.  It is best to check for any records lodged against you. While you may have a valid Iqama, it is still possible that there is an erroneous record or criminal complaint filed under your Iqama number. If so, it is best to settle it before you get caught in a checkpoint. Note that, in the video above, Saudi Police and the Jawazat - the Passport Office, are intensifying their crackdown on illegal residents and violators.  Also, if you are planning to go on vacation, or renew your Iqama, it is best to check for records before doing any of these things to make sure you will not have any problem with the Saudi Authorities in the future.


2. In the login page, enter you user name, password and the random numbers generated. Click login.
In Saudi Arabia, it is not surprising for an expat to discover that there is a criminal record or complaint lodged against him. This is due to the fact that a complained filed against you may actually be due to mistaken identity. Several reasons could be blamed, such as similarities in the names (due to translations) or even clerical error. In the latter case, if a complaint is entered in the government database, a mistake is made in the most important detail about the person - the iqama number. One number is all it takes for you to have a criminal complained or record filed against you. That is why it it important for you to check the Interior Ministry page for criminal records.  Using the (MOI) Ministry of Interior's Electronic Service called Absher, you can check any Criminal Case record on your Iqama number. Here are the steps:  1. Go to the MOI website to login to your Absher account. If you don't have one, create an account first by clicking "New User". You will need a mobile number associated with your account.  2. In the login page, enter you user name, password and the random numbers generated. Click login.  3. You will get a verification code in your mobile phone registered with MOI. Enter the number here in the box provided and click enter.  4. Once you are logged in, go to eServices > MOI Diwan > Generalization Report Query. (See numbers 1-2-3 below.  5. If you are checking for criminal records for the first time, you will get a message description of the service. Just click proceed. The result will be displayed similar to the one below:  6. If your records are clear, you will get the message: "There are no Generalization report registered against you."   7. If you get a report against you, seek advise from your employer or your embassy.  It is best to check for any records lodged against you. While you may have a valid Iqama, it is still possible that there is an erroneous record or criminal complaint filed under your Iqama number. If so, it is best to settle it before you get caught in a checkpoint. Note that, in the video above, Saudi Police and the Jawazat - the Passport Office, are intensifying their crackdown on illegal residents and violators.  Also, if you are planning to go on vacation, or renew your Iqama, it is best to check for records before doing any of these things to make sure you will not have any problem with the Saudi Authorities in the future.


3. You will get a verification code in your mobile phone registered with MOI. Enter the number here in the box provided and click enter.
In Saudi Arabia, it is not surprising for an expat to discover that there is a criminal record or complaint lodged against him. This is due to the fact that a complained filed against you may actually be due to mistaken identity. Several reasons could be blamed, such as similarities in the names (due to translations) or even clerical error. In the latter case, if a complaint is entered in the government database, a mistake is made in the most important detail about the person - the iqama number. One number is all it takes for you to have a criminal complained or record filed against you. That is why it it important for you to check the Interior Ministry page for criminal records.  Using the (MOI) Ministry of Interior's Electronic Service called Absher, you can check any Criminal Case record on your Iqama number. Here are the steps:  1. Go to the MOI website to login to your Absher account. If you don't have one, create an account first by clicking "New User". You will need a mobile number associated with your account.  2. In the login page, enter you user name, password and the random numbers generated. Click login.  3. You will get a verification code in your mobile phone registered with MOI. Enter the number here in the box provided and click enter.  4. Once you are logged in, go to eServices > MOI Diwan > Generalization Report Query. (See numbers 1-2-3 below.  5. If you are checking for criminal records for the first time, you will get a message description of the service. Just click proceed. The result will be displayed similar to the one below:  6. If your records are clear, you will get the message: "There are no Generalization report registered against you."   7. If you get a report against you, seek advise from your employer or your embassy.  It is best to check for any records lodged against you. While you may have a valid Iqama, it is still possible that there is an erroneous record or criminal complaint filed under your Iqama number. If so, it is best to settle it before you get caught in a checkpoint. Note that, in the video above, Saudi Police and the Jawazat - the Passport Office, are intensifying their crackdown on illegal residents and violators.  Also, if you are planning to go on vacation, or renew your Iqama, it is best to check for records before doing any of these things to make sure you will not have any problem with the Saudi Authorities in the future.


4. Once you are logged in, go to eServices > MOI Diwan > Generalization Report Query. (See numbers 1-2-3 below.
In Saudi Arabia, it is not surprising for an expat to discover that there is a criminal record or complaint lodged against him. This is due to the fact that a complained filed against you may actually be due to mistaken identity. Several reasons could be blamed, such as similarities in the names (due to translations) or even clerical error. In the latter case, if a complaint is entered in the government database, a mistake is made in the most important detail about the person - the iqama number. One number is all it takes for you to have a criminal complained or record filed against you. That is why it it important for you to check the Interior Ministry page for criminal records.  Using the (MOI) Ministry of Interior's Electronic Service called Absher, you can check any Criminal Case record on your Iqama number. Here are the steps:  1. Go to the MOI website to login to your Absher account. If you don't have one, create an account first by clicking "New User". You will need a mobile number associated with your account.  2. In the login page, enter you user name, password and the random numbers generated. Click login.  3. You will get a verification code in your mobile phone registered with MOI. Enter the number here in the box provided and click enter.  4. Once you are logged in, go to eServices > MOI Diwan > Generalization Report Query. (See numbers 1-2-3 below.  5. If you are checking for criminal records for the first time, you will get a message description of the service. Just click proceed. The result will be displayed similar to the one below:  6. If your records are clear, you will get the message: "There are no Generalization report registered against you."   7. If you get a report against you, seek advise from your employer or your embassy.  It is best to check for any records lodged against you. While you may have a valid Iqama, it is still possible that there is an erroneous record or criminal complaint filed under your Iqama number. If so, it is best to settle it before you get caught in a checkpoint. Note that, in the video above, Saudi Police and the Jawazat - the Passport Office, are intensifying their crackdown on illegal residents and violators.  Also, if you are planning to go on vacation, or renew your Iqama, it is best to check for records before doing any of these things to make sure you will not have any problem with the Saudi Authorities in the future.


5. If you are checking for criminal records for the first time, you will get a message description of the service. Just click proceed. The result will be displayed similar to the one below:
In Saudi Arabia, it is not surprising for an expat to discover that there is a criminal record or complaint lodged against him. This is due to the fact that a complained filed against you may actually be due to mistaken identity. Several reasons could be blamed, such as similarities in the names (due to translations) or even clerical error. In the latter case, if a complaint is entered in the government database, a mistake is made in the most important detail about the person - the iqama number. One number is all it takes for you to have a criminal complained or record filed against you. That is why it it important for you to check the Interior Ministry page for criminal records.  Using the (MOI) Ministry of Interior's Electronic Service called Absher, you can check any Criminal Case record on your Iqama number. Here are the steps:  1. Go to the MOI website to login to your Absher account. If you don't have one, create an account first by clicking "New User". You will need a mobile number associated with your account.  2. In the login page, enter you user name, password and the random numbers generated. Click login.  3. You will get a verification code in your mobile phone registered with MOI. Enter the number here in the box provided and click enter.  4. Once you are logged in, go to eServices > MOI Diwan > Generalization Report Query. (See numbers 1-2-3 below.  5. If you are checking for criminal records for the first time, you will get a message description of the service. Just click proceed. The result will be displayed similar to the one below:  6. If your records are clear, you will get the message: "There are no Generalization report registered against you."   7. If you get a report against you, seek advise from your employer or your embassy.  It is best to check for any records lodged against you. While you may have a valid Iqama, it is still possible that there is an erroneous record or criminal complaint filed under your Iqama number. If so, it is best to settle it before you get caught in a checkpoint. Note that, in the video above, Saudi Police and the Jawazat - the Passport Office, are intensifying their crackdown on illegal residents and violators.  Also, if you are planning to go on vacation, or renew your Iqama, it is best to check for records before doing any of these things to make sure you will not have any problem with the Saudi Authorities in the future.


6. If your records are clear, you will get the message: "There are no Generalization report registered against you."

7. If you get a report against you, seek advise from your employer or your embassy.



It is best to check for any records lodged against you. While you may have a valid Iqama, it is still possible that there is an erroneous record or criminal complaint filed under your Iqama number. If so, it is best to settle it before you get caught in a checkpoint. Note that, in the video above, Saudi Police and the Jawazat - the Passport Office, are intensifying their crackdown on illegal residents and violators.

Also, if you are planning to go on vacation, or renew your Iqama, it is best to check for records before doing any of these things to make sure you will not have any problem with the Saudi Authorities in the future.




OFW Remittance Will Not Be Taxed Under Duterte's Tax Reform Plan

If you are an OFW, or your family relies on OFW remittance, then here's some good news for you! If you are aware of President Duterte's Tax Reform Plan, many OFWs were wondering if their remittances are going to be taxed as some people have speculated on social media. The good news is that Finance Undersecretary Karl Kendrick Chua has confirmed that the proposed Comprehensive Tax Reform Program (CTRP) does not cover remittances from Overseas Filipino Workers since these are money coming from outside the country.  Simply put, the Philippine government has no jurisdiction over such inbound funds. Just to stress, the laws apply only to remittances sent from within the country and, even then, the principal amount itself is not taxed. Only the domestic remittance fees are being charged with value-added tax (VAT).  Economists agree, that the continuing growth of OFW remittances, as well as the local BPO Industry, are a big help in achieving the 6-7% target growth of the Philippines' GDP. Last year, overseas Filipino workers had remitted a total of $28 Billion. Remittances came mainly from the United States, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and Singapore.  Finance Secretary Carlos Dominguez III said the CTRP was expected to help reduce the poverty rate in the Philippines from 21.6 percent in 2015 to 14 percent by 2022.  Dominguez said that meant lifting some six million Filipinos out of poverty and helping the country achieve upper middle-income status.


If you are a woman and you are in Saudi Arabia, showing an inch of flesh is a criminal act.   Saudi Arabia is one of few countries in the world with the extremely strict dress code. In the Kingdom, it does not matter whether you are a local citizen or a foreigner because both of you must follow the Saudi Arabia's dress code that is governed by Sharia Law.  For Saudi, it is unacceptable for their locals to disregard the dress code and while expats are given an amount of freedom especially within their compounds, they are expected to follow the dress code when out in public.


It's been three weeks since the Dependent Fee has been implemented for Saudi Arabia Expatriate workers who brought their families to live with them. Now it is becoming clearer on who are supposed to pay, and who are exempted from paying the dependent fee. Remember that the fees amount to SR100 per family member per month, but the payment must be done annually and in full. Once paid, it cannot be refunded as well, in case your family members go out of the country. Finally, the amount increases by SR 100 every year, up to 2020 where it will be SR 400 per dependent member per month.   This has caused many expats sending their families back home. But hope emerges for a certain few expats as more details emerge. A tweet in arabic has shown a list of expats exempted from paying the dependent fees. See it below. Here are the confirmed lists of expatriates exempted from paying dependent fees: An expatriate who is married to a Saudi Citizen: A citizen's wife and children are exempted from the dependent fee. Widows and divorced women who were married to a Saudi Citizen are also exempted. However, it is not clear if this remains true if the woman married an expat after her Saudi husband dies or is divorced.  In case where the Saudi citizen is the mother, the child is still exempted.   Long-term Residents Expatriate dependents who have stayed in Saudi Arabia for most of their lives are also listed as exempted from the dependent fees. The requirement is that they must not have traveled to any country outside the kingdom for the last 40 years!   Foreign Students Foreign students who are currently studying in Saudi Arabia are exempted from paying dependent fees. To clarify, these are students whose visa states that they are in the kingdom as students. These do not include children sponsored by their parents and are merely studying as well.   Expatriates Working in the Government Sector Expats whose sponsors are a part of government are not required to pay the dependent fees. This is most welcome news for many OFWs since many Filipinos are working in the different Saudi government hospitals, schools and offices.  To further verify the news, we asked some OFWs to check their banking information - if it indeed shows no requirements for dependent fees. See the screenshots after the video.  Also, employees who are working in the government sector, but were supplied through a private contractor are not exempted.  While the Saudi Government has full rights to craft and implement their own policy, the effects of these policies cannot be easily controlled. The dependent levy is expected to enrich the kingdom's coffers, but what about the effect to the local market. Some economists argue that the gross outcome of the move will not be beneficial at all for the national economy because in the first year after the imposition of the new tax at least 1 million expats, 75 percent of them dependents, are likely to leave the Kingdom. These 1 million foreigners used to spend their money inside the Kingdom to purchase goods and services, pay rent as well as some ministry fees like exit/reentry visas. Now, they will send 50-80% of their salaries back home, reducing liquidity in the local market.  Whatever the policy may be, both Saudi nationals and expats hope for a brighter future for the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.


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