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Thursday, July 20, 2017

KSA: These Expats Are Exempted From Paying Dependent's Fees

It's been three weeks since the Dependent Fee has been implemented for Saudi Arabia Expatriate workers who brought their families to live with them. Now it is becoming clearer on who are supposed to pay, and who are exempted from paying the dependent fee. Remember that the fees amount to SR100 per family member per month, but the payment must be done annually and in full. Once paid, it cannot be refunded as well, in case your family members go out of the country. Finally, the amount increases by SR 100 every year, up to 2020 where it will be SR 400 per dependent member per month.   This has caused many expats sending their families back home. But hope emerges for a certain few expats as more details emerge. A tweet in arabic has shown a list of expats exempted from paying the dependent fees. See it below. Here are the confirmed lists of expatriates exempted from paying dependent fees: An expatriate who is married to a Saudi Citizen: A citizen's wife and children are exempted from the dependent fee. Widows and divorced women who were married to a Saudi Citizen are also exempted. However, it is not clear if this remains true if the woman married an expat after her Saudi husband dies or is divorced.  In case where the Saudi citizen is the mother, the child is still exempted.   Long-term Residents Expatriate dependents who have stayed in Saudi Arabia for most of their lives are also listed as exempted from the dependent fees. The requirement is that they must not have traveled to any country outside the kingdom for the last 40 years!   Foreign Students Foreign students who are currently studying in Saudi Arabia are exempted from paying dependent fees. To clarify, these are students whose visa states that they are in the kingdom as students. These do not include children sponsored by their parents and are merely studying as well.   Expatriates Working in the Government Sector Expats whose sponsors are a part of government are not required to pay the dependent fees. This is most welcome news for many OFWs since many Filipinos are working in the different Saudi government hospitals, schools and offices.  To further verify the news, we asked some OFWs to check their banking information - if it indeed shows no requirements for dependent fees. See the screenshots after the video.  Also, employees who are working in the government sector, but were supplied through a private contractor are not exempted.  While the Saudi Government has full rights to craft and implement their own policy, the effects of these policies cannot be easily controlled. The dependent levy is expected to enrich the kingdom's coffers, but what about the effect to the local market. Some economists argue that the gross outcome of the move will not be beneficial at all for the national economy because in the first year after the imposition of the new tax at least 1 million expats, 75 percent of them dependents, are likely to leave the Kingdom. These 1 million foreigners used to spend their money inside the Kingdom to purchase goods and services, pay rent as well as some ministry fees like exit/reentry visas. Now, they will send 50-80% of their salaries back home, reducing liquidity in the local market.  Whatever the policy may be, both Saudi nationals and expats hope for a brighter future for the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.


It's been three weeks since the Dependent Fee has been implemented for Saudi Arabia Expatriate workers who brought their families to live with them. Now it is becoming clearer on who are supposed to pay, and who are exempted from paying the dependent fee. Remember that the fees amount to SR100 per family member per month, but the payment must be done annually and in full. Once paid, it cannot be refunded as well, in case your family members go out of the country. Finally, the amount increases by SR 100 every year, up to 2020 where it will be SR 400 per dependent member per month.

This has caused many expats sending their families back home. But hope emerges for a certain few expats as more details emerge. A tweet in arabic has shown a list of expats exempted from paying the dependent fees. See it below. Here are the confirmed lists of expatriates exempted from paying dependent fees:
It's been three weeks since the Dependent Fee has been implemented for Saudi Arabia Expatriate workers who brought their families to live with them. Now it is becoming clearer on who are supposed to pay, and who are exempted from paying the dependent fee. Remember that the fees amount to SR100 per family member per month, but the payment must be done annually and in full. Once paid, it cannot be refunded as well, in case your family members go out of the country. Finally, the amount increases by SR 100 every year, up to 2020 where it will be SR 400 per dependent member per month.   This has caused many expats sending their families back home. But hope emerges for a certain few expats as more details emerge. A tweet in arabic has shown a list of expats exempted from paying the dependent fees. See it below. Here are the confirmed lists of expatriates exempted from paying dependent fees: An expatriate who is married to a Saudi Citizen: A citizen's wife and children are exempted from the dependent fee. Widows and divorced women who were married to a Saudi Citizen are also exempted. However, it is not clear if this remains true if the woman married an expat after her Saudi husband dies or is divorced.  In case where the Saudi citizen is the mother, the child is still exempted.   Long-term Residents Expatriate dependents who have stayed in Saudi Arabia for most of their lives are also listed as exempted from the dependent fees. The requirement is that they must not have traveled to any country outside the kingdom for the last 40 years!   Foreign Students Foreign students who are currently studying in Saudi Arabia are exempted from paying dependent fees. To clarify, these are students whose visa states that they are in the kingdom as students. These do not include children sponsored by their parents and are merely studying as well.   Expatriates Working in the Government Sector Expats whose sponsors are a part of government are not required to pay the dependent fees. This is most welcome news for many OFWs since many Filipinos are working in the different Saudi government hospitals, schools and offices.  To further verify the news, we asked some OFWs to check their banking information - if it indeed shows no requirements for dependent fees. See the screenshots after the video.  Also, employees who are working in the government sector, but were supplied through a private contractor are not exempted.  While the Saudi Government has full rights to craft and implement their own policy, the effects of these policies cannot be easily controlled. The dependent levy is expected to enrich the kingdom's coffers, but what about the effect to the local market. Some economists argue that the gross outcome of the move will not be beneficial at all for the national economy because in the first year after the imposition of the new tax at least 1 million expats, 75 percent of them dependents, are likely to leave the Kingdom. These 1 million foreigners used to spend their money inside the Kingdom to purchase goods and services, pay rent as well as some ministry fees like exit/reentry visas. Now, they will send 50-80% of their salaries back home, reducing liquidity in the local market.  Whatever the policy may be, both Saudi nationals and expats hope for a brighter future for the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.
Scroll below for the list in English - as well as the explanations.


An expatriate who is married to a Saudi Citizen:
A citizen's wife and children are exempted from the dependent fee. Widows and divorced women who were married to a Saudi Citizen are also exempted. However, it is not clear if this remains true if the woman married an expat after her Saudi husband dies or is divorced.

In case where the Saudi citizen is the mother, the child is still exempted.


Long-term Residents
Expatriate dependents who have stayed in Saudi Arabia for most of their lives are also listed as exempted from the dependent fees. The requirement is that they must not have traveled to any country outside the kingdom for the last 40 years!


Foreign Students
Foreign students who are currently studying in Saudi Arabia are exempted from paying dependent fees. To clarify, these are students whose visa states that they are in the kingdom as students. These do not include children sponsored by their parents and are merely studying as well.


Expatriates Working in the Government Sector
Expats whose sponsors are a part of government are not required to pay the dependent fees.
This is most welcome news for many OFWs since many Filipinos are working in the different Saudi government hospitals, schools and offices.

To further verify the news, we asked some OFWs to check their banking information - if it indeed shows no requirements for dependent fees. See the screenshots after the video.

Also, employees who are working in the government sector, but were supplied through a private contractor are not exempted.

It's been three weeks since the Dependent Fee has been implemented for Saudi Arabia Expatriate workers who brought their families to live with them. Now it is becoming clearer on who are supposed to pay, and who are exempted from paying the dependent fee. Remember that the fees amount to SR100 per family member per month, but the payment must be done annually and in full. Once paid, it cannot be refunded as well, in case your family members go out of the country. Finally, the amount increases by SR 100 every year, up to 2020 where it will be SR 400 per dependent member per month.   This has caused many expats sending their families back home. But hope emerges for a certain few expats as more details emerge. A tweet in arabic has shown a list of expats exempted from paying the dependent fees. See it below. Here are the confirmed lists of expatriates exempted from paying dependent fees: An expatriate who is married to a Saudi Citizen: A citizen's wife and children are exempted from the dependent fee. Widows and divorced women who were married to a Saudi Citizen are also exempted. However, it is not clear if this remains true if the woman married an expat after her Saudi husband dies or is divorced.  In case where the Saudi citizen is the mother, the child is still exempted.   Long-term Residents Expatriate dependents who have stayed in Saudi Arabia for most of their lives are also listed as exempted from the dependent fees. The requirement is that they must not have traveled to any country outside the kingdom for the last 40 years!   Foreign Students Foreign students who are currently studying in Saudi Arabia are exempted from paying dependent fees. To clarify, these are students whose visa states that they are in the kingdom as students. These do not include children sponsored by their parents and are merely studying as well.   Expatriates Working in the Government Sector Expats whose sponsors are a part of government are not required to pay the dependent fees. This is most welcome news for many OFWs since many Filipinos are working in the different Saudi government hospitals, schools and offices.  To further verify the news, we asked some OFWs to check their banking information - if it indeed shows no requirements for dependent fees. See the screenshots after the video.  Also, employees who are working in the government sector, but were supplied through a private contractor are not exempted.  While the Saudi Government has full rights to craft and implement their own policy, the effects of these policies cannot be easily controlled. The dependent levy is expected to enrich the kingdom's coffers, but what about the effect to the local market. Some economists argue that the gross outcome of the move will not be beneficial at all for the national economy because in the first year after the imposition of the new tax at least 1 million expats, 75 percent of them dependents, are likely to leave the Kingdom. These 1 million foreigners used to spend their money inside the Kingdom to purchase goods and services, pay rent as well as some ministry fees like exit/reentry visas. Now, they will send 50-80% of their salaries back home, reducing liquidity in the local market.  Whatever the policy may be, both Saudi nationals and expats hope for a brighter future for the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.
Expats whose Iqama, the residence card, are registered as employed by the government sector, will see "zero" in their dependent fee inquiry when using online banking.
It's been three weeks since the Dependent Fee has been implemented for Saudi Arabia Expatriate workers who brought their families to live with them. Now it is becoming clearer on who are supposed to pay, and who are exempted from paying the dependent fee. Remember that the fees amount to SR100 per family member per month, but the payment must be done annually and in full. Once paid, it cannot be refunded as well, in case your family members go out of the country. Finally, the amount increases by SR 100 every year, up to 2020 where it will be SR 400 per dependent member per month.   This has caused many expats sending their families back home. But hope emerges for a certain few expats as more details emerge. A tweet in arabic has shown a list of expats exempted from paying the dependent fees. See it below. Here are the confirmed lists of expatriates exempted from paying dependent fees: An expatriate who is married to a Saudi Citizen: A citizen's wife and children are exempted from the dependent fee. Widows and divorced women who were married to a Saudi Citizen are also exempted. However, it is not clear if this remains true if the woman married an expat after her Saudi husband dies or is divorced.  In case where the Saudi citizen is the mother, the child is still exempted.   Long-term Residents Expatriate dependents who have stayed in Saudi Arabia for most of their lives are also listed as exempted from the dependent fees. The requirement is that they must not have traveled to any country outside the kingdom for the last 40 years!   Foreign Students Foreign students who are currently studying in Saudi Arabia are exempted from paying dependent fees. To clarify, these are students whose visa states that they are in the kingdom as students. These do not include children sponsored by their parents and are merely studying as well.   Expatriates Working in the Government Sector Expats whose sponsors are a part of government are not required to pay the dependent fees. This is most welcome news for many OFWs since many Filipinos are working in the different Saudi government hospitals, schools and offices.  To further verify the news, we asked some OFWs to check their banking information - if it indeed shows no requirements for dependent fees. See the screenshots after the video.  Also, employees who are working in the government sector, but were supplied through a private contractor are not exempted.  While the Saudi Government has full rights to craft and implement their own policy, the effects of these policies cannot be easily controlled. The dependent levy is expected to enrich the kingdom's coffers, but what about the effect to the local market. Some economists argue that the gross outcome of the move will not be beneficial at all for the national economy because in the first year after the imposition of the new tax at least 1 million expats, 75 percent of them dependents, are likely to leave the Kingdom. These 1 million foreigners used to spend their money inside the Kingdom to purchase goods and services, pay rent as well as some ministry fees like exit/reentry visas. Now, they will send 50-80% of their salaries back home, reducing liquidity in the local market.  Whatever the policy may be, both Saudi nationals and expats hope for a brighter future for the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.
Another bank shows a similar message, but with "error" attached. Dependent fee amount is zero for government sector employees.


While the Saudi Government has full rights to craft and implement their own policy, the effects of these policies cannot be easily controlled. The dependent levy is expected to enrich the kingdom's coffers, but what about the effect to the local market. Some economists argue that the gross outcome of the move will not be beneficial at all for the national economy because in the first year after the imposition of the new tax at least 1 million expats, 75 percent of them dependents, are likely to leave the Kingdom. These 1 million foreigners used to spend their money inside the Kingdom to purchase goods and services, pay rent as well as some ministry fees like exit/re-entry visas. Now, they will send 50-80% of their salaries back home, reducing liquidity in the local market.

Whatever the policy may be, both Saudi nationals and expats hope for a brighter future for the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.






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