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Friday, May 11, 2018

One In Every 10 Filipino Household Has At Least One OFW

The number of Overseas Filipino Workers (OFWs) who worked abroad during the period April to September 2017 was estimated at 2.3 million. Overseas Contract Workers (OCWs) or those with existing work contract comprised 97.0 percent of the total OFWs during the period April to September 2017. The rest (3.0%) worked overseas without a contract.

The proportion of female OFWs (53.7%) was higher than male OFWs (46.3%). The largest proportion of OFWs belonged to age group 30 to 34 years comprising 21.7 percent of all OFWs, followed by those aged 25 to 29 years with 20.4 percent.
Female OFWs were younger compared to male OFWs. The higher percentage (24.1%) of female OFWs were in the age group 25 to 29 years while the male OFWs were reported to have a higher percentage (19.8%) in the age group 30 to 34 years. There were more male OFWs than female OFWs in the age group 35 years and over. In every Filipino household, there is at least one OFW among them, could be more, and their remittances has always a saving grace for keeping the Philippine economy afloat, hence, they are called the modern heroes.
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The number of Overseas Filipino Workers (OFWs) who worked abroad during the period April to September 2017 was estimated at 2.3 million. Overseas Contract Workers (OCWs) or those with existing work contract comprised 97.0 percent of the total OFWs during the period April to September 2017. The rest (3.0%) worked overseas without a contract.    The proportion of female OFWs (53.7%) was higher than male OFWs (46.3%). The largest proportion of OFWs belonged to age group 30 to 34 years comprising 21.7 percent of all OFWs, followed by those aged 25 to 29 years with 20.4 percent.   Female OFWs were younger compared to male OFWs. The higher percentage (24.1%) of female OFWs were in the age group 25 to 29 years while the male OFWs were reported to have a higher percentage (19.8%) in the age group 30 to 34 years. There were more male OFWs than female OFWs in the age group 35 years and over. In every Filipino household, there is at least one OFW, could be more and their remittances has always a saving grace for the Philippine economy.  Advertisement        Sponsored Links  In 2017, the Philippines stood as the third largest recipient ($33 billion) of remittances in the world, only behind giants of India ($69 billion) and China ($64 billion). Yet, this much-needed exogenous economic boost has come at a steep social cost.  These include, among others, the creation of a culture of dependency among relatives of OFWs; separation of nuclear families, as one or both parents left behind their children back home; and, crucially, subjecting hundreds of thousands of Filipinos to potential abuse and dangerous working conditions in undemocratic nations with limited respect for human and labor rights.  Yet, with the Philippines emerging as the fastest growing economy in the region, it’s now in a better position to provide employment at home. In fact, amid a $180 billion infrastructure buildup, the Southeast Asian country is running short of labor, particularly in the construction sector.         More than one in every three (37.6%) OFWs were employed in elementary occupations. Around 18.0 percent worked as service and sales workers. OFWs who worked as plant and machine operators and assemblers comprised 13.7 percent, and craft and related trade workers, 11.4 percent (Table 2).     The largest proportion of OFWs were from CALABARZON (20.7% of the total OFWs). Those coming from Central Luzon comprised 12.9 percent, and those from the National Capital Region and Western Visayas, both were 9.5 percent. On the other hand, the smallest number of OFWs came from Caraga (1.7% of the total OFWs) (Table 3).    Saudi Arabia was the most preferred country of destination among OFWs (25.4%). The other countries of destination were United Arab Emirates (15.3%), Kuwait (6.7%) and Hongkong (6.5%) (Table 3).    The total remittance sent by OFWs during the period April to September 2017 was estimated at 205.2 billion pesos. These remittances included cash sent home (146.8 billion pesos), cash brought home (48.3 billion pesos) and remittances in kind (10.1 billion pesos). The majority of OFWs sent their remittance through banks (62.8%) while the rest through agencies or local offices (3.1%), door-to-door delivery (0.8%), friends or co-workers (0.1%) or through other means (33.1%) (Tables 4 and 5).    The remittances sent by OFWs to their respective families may just be a part of the total salary received by the OFWs. Data on remittances in this report are based on the answers given by the survey respondents to the questions on how much cash remittance was received by the family during the period April to September 2017 from a family member who is an OFW and how much cash did this member bring home during the reference period, if any. Further, if the family received during the reference period goods and products sent by this OFW, the imputed value of such goods was included in his/her total remittance.        READ MORE: It's More Deadly In The Philippines? Tourism Ad In New York, Vandalized    Earn While Helping Your Friends Get Their Loan    List of Philippine Embassies And Consulates Around The World    Deployment Ban In Kuwait To Be Lifted Only If OFWs Are 100% Protected —Cayetano    Why OFWs From Kuwait Afraid Of Coming Home?   How to Avail Auto, Salary And Home Loan From Union Bank

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In 2017, the Philippines stood as the third largest recipient ($33 billion) of remittances in the world, only behind giants of India ($69 billion) and China ($64 billion). Yet, this much-needed exogenous economic boost has come at a steep social cost.

These include, among others, the creation of a culture of dependency among relatives of OFWs; separation of nuclear families, as one or both parents left behind their children back home; and, crucially, subjecting hundreds of thousands of Filipinos to potential abuse and dangerous working conditions in undemocratic nations with limited respect for human and labor rights.

Yet, with the Philippines emerging as the fastest growing economy in the region, it’s now in a better position to provide employment at home. In fact, amid a $180 billion infrastructure buildup, the Southeast Asian country is running short of labor, particularly in the construction sector.




More than one in every three (37.6%) OFWs were employed in elementary occupations. Around 18.0 percent worked as service and sales workers. OFWs who worked as plant and machine operators and assemblers comprised 13.7 percent, and craft and related trade workers, 11.4 percent (Table 2). 

The largest proportion of OFWs were from CALABARZON (20.7% of the total OFWs). Those coming from Central Luzon comprised 12.9 percent, and those from the National Capital Region and Western Visayas, both were 9.5 percent. On the other hand, the smallest number of OFWs came from Caraga (1.7% of the total OFWs) (Table 3).

Saudi Arabia was the most preferred country of destination among OFWs (25.4%). The other countries of destination were United Arab Emirates (15.3%), Kuwait (6.7%) and Hongkong (6.5%) (Table 3).

The total remittance sent by OFWs during the period April to September 2017 was estimated at 205.2 billion pesos. These remittances included cash sent home (146.8 billion pesos), cash brought home (48.3 billion pesos) and remittances in kind (10.1 billion pesos). The majority of OFWs sent their remittance through banks (62.8%) while the rest through agencies or local offices (3.1%), door-to-door delivery (0.8%), friends or co-workers (0.1%) or through other means (33.1%) (Tables 4 and 5).

The remittances sent by OFWs to their respective families may just be a part of the total salary received by the OFWs. Data on remittances in this report are based on the answers given by the survey respondents to the questions on how much cash remittance was received by the family during the period April to September 2017 from a family member who is an OFW and how much cash did this member bring home during the reference period, if any. Further, if the family received during the reference period goods and products sent by this OFW, the imputed value of such goods was included in his/her total remittance.
The number of Overseas Filipino Workers (OFWs) who worked abroad during the period April to September 2017 was estimated at 2.3 million. Overseas Contract Workers (OCWs) or those with existing work contract comprised 97.0 percent of the total OFWs during the period April to September 2017. The rest (3.0%) worked overseas without a contract.    The proportion of female OFWs (53.7%) was higher than male OFWs (46.3%). The largest proportion of OFWs belonged to age group 30 to 34 years comprising 21.7 percent of all OFWs, followed by those aged 25 to 29 years with 20.4 percent.   Female OFWs were younger compared to male OFWs. The higher percentage (24.1%) of female OFWs were in the age group 25 to 29 years while the male OFWs were reported to have a higher percentage (19.8%) in the age group 30 to 34 years. There were more male OFWs than female OFWs in the age group 35 years and over. In every Filipino household, there is at least one OFW, could be more and their remittances has always a saving grace for the Philippine economy.  Advertisement        Sponsored Links  In 2017, the Philippines stood as the third largest recipient ($33 billion) of remittances in the world, only behind giants of India ($69 billion) and China ($64 billion). Yet, this much-needed exogenous economic boost has come at a steep social cost.  These include, among others, the creation of a culture of dependency among relatives of OFWs; separation of nuclear families, as one or both parents left behind their children back home; and, crucially, subjecting hundreds of thousands of Filipinos to potential abuse and dangerous working conditions in undemocratic nations with limited respect for human and labor rights.  Yet, with the Philippines emerging as the fastest growing economy in the region, it’s now in a better position to provide employment at home. In fact, amid a $180 billion infrastructure buildup, the Southeast Asian country is running short of labor, particularly in the construction sector.         More than one in every three (37.6%) OFWs were employed in elementary occupations. Around 18.0 percent worked as service and sales workers. OFWs who worked as plant and machine operators and assemblers comprised 13.7 percent, and craft and related trade workers, 11.4 percent (Table 2).     The largest proportion of OFWs were from CALABARZON (20.7% of the total OFWs). Those coming from Central Luzon comprised 12.9 percent, and those from the National Capital Region and Western Visayas, both were 9.5 percent. On the other hand, the smallest number of OFWs came from Caraga (1.7% of the total OFWs) (Table 3).    Saudi Arabia was the most preferred country of destination among OFWs (25.4%). The other countries of destination were United Arab Emirates (15.3%), Kuwait (6.7%) and Hongkong (6.5%) (Table 3).    The total remittance sent by OFWs during the period April to September 2017 was estimated at 205.2 billion pesos. These remittances included cash sent home (146.8 billion pesos), cash brought home (48.3 billion pesos) and remittances in kind (10.1 billion pesos). The majority of OFWs sent their remittance through banks (62.8%) while the rest through agencies or local offices (3.1%), door-to-door delivery (0.8%), friends or co-workers (0.1%) or through other means (33.1%) (Tables 4 and 5).    The remittances sent by OFWs to their respective families may just be a part of the total salary received by the OFWs. Data on remittances in this report are based on the answers given by the survey respondents to the questions on how much cash remittance was received by the family during the period April to September 2017 from a family member who is an OFW and how much cash did this member bring home during the reference period, if any. Further, if the family received during the reference period goods and products sent by this OFW, the imputed value of such goods was included in his/her total remittance.        READ MORE: It's More Deadly In The Philippines? Tourism Ad In New York, Vandalized    Earn While Helping Your Friends Get Their Loan    List of Philippine Embassies And Consulates Around The World    Deployment Ban In Kuwait To Be Lifted Only If OFWs Are 100% Protected —Cayetano    Why OFWs From Kuwait Afraid Of Coming Home?   How to Avail Auto, Salary And Home Loan From Union Bank





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