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Tuesday, August 28, 2018

Former OFW Found Riches In Mushroom Farming

Riches and success are not only found by having an overseas job or by finding work abroad. Many overseas Filipino workers  (OFW) realize it after coming home for good and starting their own business. Sometimes you can be rich by simply doing it in your own backyard. Just like what happened to a former OFW in Taiwan who was laid off from his work as a welder and forced to come home. Little did he know that it is the very last time that he will be working outside the country. Now, he is earning 27,500 per month just by farming mushroom. His overseas job was replaced with a sustainable livelihood and a better income without the need to look for an overseas job and leave his family behind again.
Riches and success are not only found by having an overseas job or by finding work abroad. Many overseas Filipino workers  (OFW) realize it after coming home for good and starting their own business. Sometimes you can be rich by simply doing it in your own backyard. Just like what happened to a former OFW in Taiwan who was laid off from his work as a welder and forced to come home. Little did he know that it is the very last time that he will be working outside the country. Now, he is earning 27,500 per month just by farming mushroom. His overseas job was replaced with a sustainable livelihood and a better income without the need to look for an overseas job and leave his family behind again.      Advertisement     Freddie Usita, 50, returned to his hometown in Piddig, Ilocos Norte and set up a small quail production business and a backyard mushroom production business.    After he failed from his former mushroom farming business which he attributed to lack of proper knowledge, he decide to enroll himself in the Marcos Agro-Industrial School under the Technical Education and Skills Development Authority (TESDA).    After he graduated from the said school, Usita decided to re-establish his oyster white mushroom and the oyster gray mushroom production, this time, it was a success.    The former laid-off OFW  now owns Usita Mushroom Farm in Ilocos Norte which supplies mushroom to their neighboring provinces like Ilocos Sur and Cagayan.

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Freddie Usita, 50, returned to his hometown in Piddig, Ilocos Norte and set up a small quail production business and a backyard mushroom production business.



After he failed from his former mushroom farming business which he attributed to lack of proper knowledge, he decide to enroll himself in the Marcos Agro-Industrial School under the Technical Education and Skills Development Authority (TESDA).


After he graduated from the said school, Usita decided to re-establish his oyster white mushroom and the oyster gray mushroom production, this time, it was a success.

The former laid-off OFW  now owns Usita Mushroom Farm in Ilocos Norte which supplies mushroom to their neighboring provinces like Ilocos Sur and Cagayan.

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Riches and success are not only found by having an overseas job or by finding work abroad. Many overseas Filipino workers  (OFW) realize it after coming home for good and starting their own business. Sometimes you can be rich by simply doing it in your own backyard. Just like what happened to a former OFW in Taiwan who was laid off from his work as a welder and forced to come home. Little did he know that it is the very last time that he will be working outside the country. Now, he is earning 27,500 per month just by farming mushroom. His overseas job was replaced with a sustainable livelihood and a better income without the need to look for an overseas job and leave his family behind again.      Advertisement     Freddie Usita, 50, returned to his hometown in Piddig, Ilocos Norte and set up a small quail production business and a backyard mushroom production business.    After he failed from his former mushroom farming business which he attributed to lack of proper knowledge, he decide to enroll himself in the Marcos Agro-Industrial School under the Technical Education and Skills Development Authority (TESDA).    After he graduated from the said school, Usita decided to re-establish his oyster white mushroom and the oyster gray mushroom production, this time, it was a success.    The former laid-off OFW  now owns Usita Mushroom Farm in Ilocos Norte which supplies mushroom to their neighboring provinces like Ilocos Sur and Cagayan.

Aside from growing mushroom, he also ventured out in the production of mushroom fruiting bags.

with his earning, Usita was able to purchase an agricultural land and a vehicle for his business. He is also able to send his youngest child to school while his eldest finished in a reputable school in Ilocos Norte. Now he is able to set aside a portion of his income as savings, which he cannot do while working abroad.



Due to his success, Usita received 2016 Idols ng TESDA for Region 1 and was one of the nominees of the award in the national level.

We have a lot of opportunities in our country, however, we only need to be more creative coupled with more patience and perseverance,” Usita said.


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Mushroom farming is now becoming popular in the Philippines and other neighboring countries in Asia, Africa, and Europe. Since we are in a tropical country with plenty of lands suitable for farming, it can be the future crop that will enable us to bounce back in life just like OFW Freddie Usita.
Filed under overseas job,  work abroad, overseas Filipino workers, Taiwan, farming,  mushroom,  livelihood, 
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What is the main reason why many Filipinos decided to leave their beloved family behind and work abroad? It is to earn more in order to be able to give their family the best possible future they can give. To buy the things they need, to have their own house to call their home, etc. The overseas Filipino workers  (OFW) are usually breadwinners supporting even their extended families as well. The remittances the OFWs send to their loved ones used to be enough to pay their bills, mortgages and even a little extra for them to go to the mall and enjoy. Today, the families of the OFWs are experiencing difficulty in stretching their budget for the whole month due to the high prices of everything. From basic commodities, transport fares, school supplies, etc.        Advertisement  Godofredo's wife is an OFW in Malaysia. She needed to work there because the family cannot rely on his salary as a "barangay tanod" alone. They use the remittances they receive from his OFW wife for the education of their children, while his salary from his local job is used to pay their electric and water bills.   Gina also experienced difficulty in making ends meet and forced to transfer her children to a public school because the remittances sent by her OFW husband is not enough anymore for their expenses.  The remittances sent by OFWs abroad is considered the redeeming grace for the Philippine economy by helping stabilize the country's dollar reserve.    Ads   The Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas (BSP) said that the OFW remittances had been slowing down and this year was the slowest flow of cash remittances in the past seventeen years. It is due to the repatriation program of the government, according to the BSP.  From $13.8 Billion from January to June last year, OFW remittances had slightly gone up to $14.2 Billion at the same period this year.  The government said headline inflation rate went up to 4.6 % in May as compared to 2.9%  last year mainly caused by price increases in fish and seafood, fuel, lubricants, bread, and cereals. Average inflation at 4.1 %, higher than the government’s 2 - 4 % target for 2018. Due to the price hike, OFWs are encouraged to send at least 20% more of their usual remittance for their family to cope up with the experienced inflation, at least until the prices stabilized.    Ads  While OFWs do their best to provide for heir family back home, the latter also need to learn to value their sacrifices and hardships by spending the remittances wisely. It is important for them to know how to spend the remittances wisely as a way of helping their beloved OFW.
What is the main reason why many Filipinos decided to leave their beloved family behind and work abroad? It is to earn more in order to be able to give their family the best possible future they can give. To buy the things they need, to have their own house to call their home, etc. The overseas Filipino workers  (OFW) are usually breadwinners supporting even their extended families as well. The remittances the OFWs send to their loved ones used to be enough to pay their bills, mortgages and even a little extra for them to go to the mall and enjoy. Today, the families of the OFWs are experiencing difficulty in stretching their budget for the whole month due to the high prices of everything. From basic commodities, transport fares, school supplies, etc.        Advertisement  Godofredo's wife is an OFW in Malaysia. She needed to work there because the family cannot rely on his salary as a "barangay tanod" alone. They use the remittances they receive from his OFW wife for the education of their children, while his salary from his local job is used to pay their electric and water bills.   Gina also experienced difficulty in making ends meet and forced to transfer her children to a public school because the remittances sent by her OFW husband is not enough anymore for their expenses.  The remittances sent by OFWs abroad is considered the redeeming grace for the Philippine economy by helping stabilize the country's dollar reserve.    Ads   The Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas (BSP) said that the OFW remittances had been slowing down and this year was the slowest flow of cash remittances in the past seventeen years. It is due to the repatriation program of the government, according to the BSP.  From $13.8 Billion from January to June last year, OFW remittances had slightly gone up to $14.2 Billion at the same period this year.  The government said headline inflation rate went up to 4.6 % in May as compared to 2.9%  last year mainly caused by price increases in fish and seafood, fuel, lubricants, bread, and cereals. Average inflation at 4.1 %, higher than the government’s 2 - 4 % target for 2018. Due to the price hike, OFWs are encouraged to send at least 20% more of their usual remittance for their family to cope up with the experienced inflation, at least until the prices stabilized.    Ads  While OFWs do their best to provide for heir family back home, the latter also need to learn to value their sacrifices and hardships by spending the remittances wisely. It is important for them to know how to spend the remittances wisely as a way of helping their beloved OFW.
What is the main reason why many Filipinos decided to leave their beloved family behind and work abroad? It is to earn more in order to be able to give their family the best possible future they can give. To buy the things they need, to have their own house to call their home, etc. The overseas Filipino workers  (OFW) are usually breadwinners supporting even their extended families as well. The remittances the OFWs send to their loved ones used to be enough to pay their bills, mortgages and even a little extra for them to go to the mall and enjoy. Today, the families of the OFWs are experiencing difficulty in stretching their budget for the whole month due to the high prices of everything. From basic commodities, transport fares, school supplies, etc.        Advertisement  Godofredo's wife is an OFW in Malaysia. She needed to work there because the family cannot rely on his salary as a "barangay tanod" alone. They use the remittances they receive from his OFW wife for the education of their children, while his salary from his local job is used to pay their electric and water bills.   Gina also experienced difficulty in making ends meet and forced to transfer her children to a public school because the remittances sent by her OFW husband is not enough anymore for their expenses.  The remittances sent by OFWs abroad is considered the redeeming grace for the Philippine economy by helping stabilize the country's dollar reserve.    Ads   The Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas (BSP) said that the OFW remittances had been slowing down and this year was the slowest flow of cash remittances in the past seventeen years. It is due to the repatriation program of the government, according to the BSP.  From $13.8 Billion from January to June last year, OFW remittances had slightly gone up to $14.2 Billion at the same period this year.  The government said headline inflation rate went up to 4.6 % in May as compared to 2.9%  last year mainly caused by price increases in fish and seafood, fuel, lubricants, bread, and cereals. Average inflation at 4.1 %, higher than the government’s 2 - 4 % target for 2018. Due to the price hike, OFWs are encouraged to send at least 20% more of their usual remittance for their family to cope up with the experienced inflation, at least until the prices stabilized.    Ads  While OFWs do their best to provide for heir family back home, the latter also need to learn to value their sacrifices and hardships by spending the remittances wisely. It is important for them to know how to spend the remittances wisely as a way of helping their beloved OFW.
What is the main reason why many Filipinos decided to leave their beloved family behind and work abroad? It is to earn more in order to be able to give their family the best possible future they can give. To buy the things they need, to have their own house to call their home, etc. The overseas Filipino workers  (OFW) are usually breadwinners supporting even their extended families as well. The remittances the OFWs send to their loved ones used to be enough to pay their bills, mortgages and even a little extra for them to go to the mall and enjoy. Today, the families of the OFWs are experiencing difficulty in stretching their budget for the whole month due to the high prices of everything. From basic commodities, transport fares, school supplies, etc.        Advertisement  Godofredo's wife is an OFW in Malaysia. She needed to work there because the family cannot rely on his salary as a "barangay tanod" alone. They use the remittances they receive from his OFW wife for the education of their children, while his salary from his local job is used to pay their electric and water bills.   Gina also experienced difficulty in making ends meet and forced to transfer her children to a public school because the remittances sent by her OFW husband is not enough anymore for their expenses.  The remittances sent by OFWs abroad is considered the redeeming grace for the Philippine economy by helping stabilize the country's dollar reserve.    Ads   The Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas (BSP) said that the OFW remittances had been slowing down and this year was the slowest flow of cash remittances in the past seventeen years. It is due to the repatriation program of the government, according to the BSP.  From $13.8 Billion from January to June last year, OFW remittances had slightly gone up to $14.2 Billion at the same period this year.  The government said headline inflation rate went up to 4.6 % in May as compared to 2.9%  last year mainly caused by price increases in fish and seafood, fuel, lubricants, bread, and cereals. Average inflation at 4.1 %, higher than the government’s 2 - 4 % target for 2018. Due to the price hike, OFWs are encouraged to send at least 20% more of their usual remittance for their family to cope up with the experienced inflation, at least until the prices stabilized.    Ads  While OFWs do their best to provide for heir family back home, the latter also need to learn to value their sacrifices and hardships by spending the remittances wisely. It is important for them to know how to spend the remittances wisely as a way of helping their beloved OFW.
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