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Sunday, August 06, 2017

Qatar Will be the First Gulf State to Allow Permanent Residency

A ground-breaking development is coming from Doha, Qatar. In a first for the Gulf, Qatar's cabinet ministers approved the creation of a new permanent resident status for certain groups of foreigners, including those who have worked for the benefit of the emirate.  Under the new rules, children with a Qatari mother and a foreign father can benefit from the new status. Foreign residents who have "given service to Qatar" or have "skills that can benefit the country will also benefit from the new status.  Those deemed eligible for the new status will be afforded the same access as Qataris to free public services, such as health and education. They will also receive preferable treatment for jobs in the government and armed forces as well as being able to own their own properties and put up commercial business without the need for a Qatari partner.  In a 2016 article, an online media group ranks Qatar as one of the highest paying countries of destination for OFWs - second only to the US.  While the new permanent residency status is not the same as a Qatari nationality, it's as close to the real thing. It is also a huge leap forward for expat relations since naturalization is extremely rare in the region and the movements, including the residency status, of the millions of foreigners working in the Gulf are strictly limited.   Rich in oil and gas, Qatar has a population of 2.4 million people. Almost 90% of that number are foreigners, including a big number from Southeast Asia working in labor and construction.  The legislation was approved after Qatar’s ruler, Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani, instructed government officials to expedite measures to lure investments and reduce the economy’s reliance on energy products in the wake of an ongoing Arab Boycott - where Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, UAE and Egypt are singling out Qatar for alleged terrorist connections, among other things.    Approving these laws doesn’t mean that implementation will swiftly follow. As of now, Qatar's Interior Ministry is setting up a department to consider applications for this new residence status.  The new law also plays an important role in keeping Qatar's international image afloat amid the diplomatic crisis with its neighbors. Portraying itself as a victim, the new law paints a picture of Qatar that is more open, forward-thinking state when compared to its neighbors, which still uses a decades-old sponsorship system known locally as "Kafala."  Others speculate that the move was aimed to embarrass the rest of the Gulf states, showing Qatar as taking the situation of human rights into account when making government decisions. They say the decision was a ploy to keep expatriates in the country. Some expats are thinking about leaving the country following the long-growing crisis that began on June 5.   Sources: GMA, Bloomberg, Reuters, Gulf News




A ground-breaking development is coming from Doha, Qatar. In a first for the Gulf, Qatar's cabinet ministers approved the creation of a new permanent resident status for certain groups of foreigners, including those who have worked for the benefit of the emirate.

Under the new rules, children with a Qatari mother and a foreign father can benefit from the new status. Foreign residents who have "given service to Qatar" or have "skills that can benefit the country will also benefit from the new status.
A ground-breaking development is coming from Doha, Qatar. In a first for the Gulf, Qatar's cabinet ministers approved the creation of a new permanent resident status for certain groups of foreigners, including those who have worked for the benefit of the emirate.  Under the new rules, children with a Qatari mother and a foreign father can benefit from the new status. Foreign residents who have "given service to Qatar" or have "skills that can benefit the country will also benefit from the new status.  Those deemed eligible for the new status will be afforded the same access as Qataris to free public services, such as health and education. They will also receive preferable treatment for jobs in the government and armed forces as well as being able to own their own properties and put up commercial business without the need for a Qatari partner.  In a 2016 article, an online media group ranks Qatar as one of the highest paying countries of destination for OFWs - second only to the US.  While the new permanent residency status is not the same as a Qatari nationality, it's as close to the real thing. It is also a huge leap forward for expat relations since naturalization is extremely rare in the region and the movements, including the residency status, of the millions of foreigners working in the Gulf are strictly limited.   Rich in oil and gas, Qatar has a population of 2.4 million people. Almost 90% of that number are foreigners, including a big number from Southeast Asia working in labor and construction.  The legislation was approved after Qatar’s ruler, Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani, instructed government officials to expedite measures to lure investments and reduce the economy’s reliance on energy products in the wake of an ongoing Arab Boycott - where Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, UAE and Egypt are singling out Qatar for alleged terrorist connections, among other things.    Approving these laws doesn’t mean that implementation will swiftly follow. As of now, Qatar's Interior Ministry is setting up a department to consider applications for this new residence status.  The new law also plays an important role in keeping Qatar's international image afloat amid the diplomatic crisis with its neighbors. Portraying itself as a victim, the new law paints a picture of Qatar that is more open, forward-thinking state when compared to its neighbors, which still uses a decades-old sponsorship system known locally as "Kafala."  Others speculate that the move was aimed to embarrass the rest of the Gulf states, showing Qatar as taking the situation of human rights into account when making government decisions. They say the decision was a ploy to keep expatriates in the country. Some expats are thinking about leaving the country following the long-growing crisis that began on June 5.   Sources: GMA, Bloomberg, Reuters, Gulf News
Panoramic view of downtown Qatar.

Those deemed eligible for the new status will be afforded the same access as Qataris to free public services, such as health and education. They will also receive preferable treatment for jobs in the government and armed forces as well as being able to own their own properties and put up commercial business without the need for a Qatari partner.

In a 2016 article, an online media group ranks Qatar as one of the highest paying countries of destination for OFWs - second only to the US.

A ground-breaking development is coming from Doha, Qatar. In a first for the Gulf, Qatar's cabinet ministers approved the creation of a new permanent resident status for certain groups of foreigners, including those who have worked for the benefit of the emirate.  Under the new rules, children with a Qatari mother and a foreign father can benefit from the new status. Foreign residents who have "given service to Qatar" or have "skills that can benefit the country will also benefit from the new status.  Those deemed eligible for the new status will be afforded the same access as Qataris to free public services, such as health and education. They will also receive preferable treatment for jobs in the government and armed forces as well as being able to own their own properties and put up commercial business without the need for a Qatari partner.  In a 2016 article, an online media group ranks Qatar as one of the highest paying countries of destination for OFWs - second only to the US.  While the new permanent residency status is not the same as a Qatari nationality, it's as close to the real thing. It is also a huge leap forward for expat relations since naturalization is extremely rare in the region and the movements, including the residency status, of the millions of foreigners working in the Gulf are strictly limited.   Rich in oil and gas, Qatar has a population of 2.4 million people. Almost 90% of that number are foreigners, including a big number from Southeast Asia working in labor and construction.  The legislation was approved after Qatar’s ruler, Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani, instructed government officials to expedite measures to lure investments and reduce the economy’s reliance on energy products in the wake of an ongoing Arab Boycott - where Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, UAE and Egypt are singling out Qatar for alleged terrorist connections, among other things.    Approving these laws doesn’t mean that implementation will swiftly follow. As of now, Qatar's Interior Ministry is setting up a department to consider applications for this new residence status.  The new law also plays an important role in keeping Qatar's international image afloat amid the diplomatic crisis with its neighbors. Portraying itself as a victim, the new law paints a picture of Qatar that is more open, forward-thinking state when compared to its neighbors, which still uses a decades-old sponsorship system known locally as "Kafala."  Others speculate that the move was aimed to embarrass the rest of the Gulf states, showing Qatar as taking the situation of human rights into account when making government decisions. They say the decision was a ploy to keep expatriates in the country. Some expats are thinking about leaving the country following the long-growing crisis that began on June 5.   Sources: GMA, Bloomberg, Reuters, Gulf News

A ground-breaking development is coming from Doha, Qatar. In a first for the Gulf, Qatar's cabinet ministers approved the creation of a new permanent resident status for certain groups of foreigners, including those who have worked for the benefit of the emirate.  Under the new rules, children with a Qatari mother and a foreign father can benefit from the new status. Foreign residents who have "given service to Qatar" or have "skills that can benefit the country will also benefit from the new status.  Those deemed eligible for the new status will be afforded the same access as Qataris to free public services, such as health and education. They will also receive preferable treatment for jobs in the government and armed forces as well as being able to own their own properties and put up commercial business without the need for a Qatari partner.  In a 2016 article, an online media group ranks Qatar as one of the highest paying countries of destination for OFWs - second only to the US.  While the new permanent residency status is not the same as a Qatari nationality, it's as close to the real thing. It is also a huge leap forward for expat relations since naturalization is extremely rare in the region and the movements, including the residency status, of the millions of foreigners working in the Gulf are strictly limited.   Rich in oil and gas, Qatar has a population of 2.4 million people. Almost 90% of that number are foreigners, including a big number from Southeast Asia working in labor and construction.  The legislation was approved after Qatar’s ruler, Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani, instructed government officials to expedite measures to lure investments and reduce the economy’s reliance on energy products in the wake of an ongoing Arab Boycott - where Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, UAE and Egypt are singling out Qatar for alleged terrorist connections, among other things.    Approving these laws doesn’t mean that implementation will swiftly follow. As of now, Qatar's Interior Ministry is setting up a department to consider applications for this new residence status.  The new law also plays an important role in keeping Qatar's international image afloat amid the diplomatic crisis with its neighbors. Portraying itself as a victim, the new law paints a picture of Qatar that is more open, forward-thinking state when compared to its neighbors, which still uses a decades-old sponsorship system known locally as "Kafala."  Others speculate that the move was aimed to embarrass the rest of the Gulf states, showing Qatar as taking the situation of human rights into account when making government decisions. They say the decision was a ploy to keep expatriates in the country. Some expats are thinking about leaving the country following the long-growing crisis that began on June 5.   Sources: GMA, Bloomberg, Reuters, Gulf News
Standard salary brackets of large Qatar companies (in USD)
While the new permanent residency status is not the same as a Qatari nationality, it's as close to the real thing. It is also a huge leap forward for expat relations since naturalization is extremely rare in the region and the movements, including the residency status, of the millions of foreigners working in the Gulf are strictly limited.

A ground-breaking development is coming from Doha, Qatar. In a first for the Gulf, Qatar's cabinet ministers approved the creation of a new permanent resident status for certain groups of foreigners, including those who have worked for the benefit of the emirate.  Under the new rules, children with a Qatari mother and a foreign father can benefit from the new status. Foreign residents who have "given service to Qatar" or have "skills that can benefit the country will also benefit from the new status.  Those deemed eligible for the new status will be afforded the same access as Qataris to free public services, such as health and education. They will also receive preferable treatment for jobs in the government and armed forces as well as being able to own their own properties and put up commercial business without the need for a Qatari partner.  In a 2016 article, an online media group ranks Qatar as one of the highest paying countries of destination for OFWs - second only to the US.  While the new permanent residency status is not the same as a Qatari nationality, it's as close to the real thing. It is also a huge leap forward for expat relations since naturalization is extremely rare in the region and the movements, including the residency status, of the millions of foreigners working in the Gulf are strictly limited.   Rich in oil and gas, Qatar has a population of 2.4 million people. Almost 90% of that number are foreigners, including a big number from Southeast Asia working in labor and construction.  The legislation was approved after Qatar’s ruler, Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani, instructed government officials to expedite measures to lure investments and reduce the economy’s reliance on energy products in the wake of an ongoing Arab Boycott - where Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, UAE and Egypt are singling out Qatar for alleged terrorist connections, among other things.    Approving these laws doesn’t mean that implementation will swiftly follow. As of now, Qatar's Interior Ministry is setting up a department to consider applications for this new residence status.  The new law also plays an important role in keeping Qatar's international image afloat amid the diplomatic crisis with its neighbors. Portraying itself as a victim, the new law paints a picture of Qatar that is more open, forward-thinking state when compared to its neighbors, which still uses a decades-old sponsorship system known locally as "Kafala."  Others speculate that the move was aimed to embarrass the rest of the Gulf states, showing Qatar as taking the situation of human rights into account when making government decisions. They say the decision was a ploy to keep expatriates in the country. Some expats are thinking about leaving the country following the long-growing crisis that began on June 5.   Sources: GMA, Bloomberg, Reuters, Gulf News
Demographics of Qatar. Indians make up the most number, while Filipinos add a size-able amount too.
Rich in oil and gas, Qatar has a population of 2.4 million people. Almost 90% of that number are foreigners, including a big number from Southeast Asia working in labor and construction.


Cost of Living in Qatar
The legislation was approved after Qatar’s ruler, Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani, instructed government officials to expedite measures to lure investments and reduce the economy’s reliance on energy products in the wake of an ongoing Arab Boycott - where Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, UAE and Egypt are singling out Qatar for alleged terrorist connections, among other things.
A ground-breaking development is coming from Doha, Qatar. In a first for the Gulf, Qatar's cabinet ministers approved the creation of a new permanent resident status for certain groups of foreigners, including those who have worked for the benefit of the emirate.  Under the new rules, children with a Qatari mother and a foreign father can benefit from the new status. Foreign residents who have "given service to Qatar" or have "skills that can benefit the country will also benefit from the new status.  Those deemed eligible for the new status will be afforded the same access as Qataris to free public services, such as health and education. They will also receive preferable treatment for jobs in the government and armed forces as well as being able to own their own properties and put up commercial business without the need for a Qatari partner.  In a 2016 article, an online media group ranks Qatar as one of the highest paying countries of destination for OFWs - second only to the aUS.  While the new permanent residency status is not the same as a Qatari nationality, it's as close to the real thing. It is also a huge leap forward for expat relations since naturalization is extremely rare in the region and the movements, including the residency status, of the millions of foreigners working in the Gulf are strictly limited.   Rich in oil and gas, Qatar has a population of 2.4 million people. Almost 90% of that number are foreigners, including a big number from Southeast Asia working in labor and construction.  The legislation was approved after Qatar’s ruler, Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani, instructed government officials to expedite measures to lure investments and reduce the economy’s reliance on energy products in the wake of an ongoing Arab Boycott - where Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, UAE and Egypt are singling out Qatar for alleged terrorist connections, among other things.    Approving these laws doesn’t mean that implementation will swiftly follow. As of now, Qatar's Interior Ministry is setting up a department to consider applications for this new residence status.  The new law also plays an important role in keeping Qatar's international image afloat amid the diplomatic crisis with its neighbors. Portraying itself as a victim, the new law paints a picture of Qatar that is more open, forward-thinking state when compared to its neighbors, which still uses a decades-old sponsorship system known locally as "Kafala."  Others speculate that the move was aimed to embarrass the rest of the Gulf states, showing Qatar as taking the situation of human rights into account when making government decisions. They say the decision was a ploy to keep expatriates in the country. Some expats are thinking about leaving the country following the long-growing crisis that began on June 5.   Sources: GMA, Bloomberg, Reuters, Gulf News
Qatar’s ruler, Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani

Approving these laws doesn’t mean that implementation will swiftly follow. As of now, Qatar's Interior Ministry is setting up a department to consider applications for this new residence status.

The new law also plays an important role in keeping Qatar's international image afloat amid the diplomatic crisis with its neighbors. Portraying itself as a victim, the new law paints a picture of Qatar that is more open, forward-thinking state when compared to its neighbors, which still uses a decades-old sponsorship system known locally as "Kafala."
A ground-breaking development is coming from Doha, Qatar. In a first for the Gulf, Qatar's cabinet ministers approved the creation of a new permanent resident status for certain groups of foreigners, including those who have worked for the benefit of the emirate.  Under the new rules, children with a Qatari mother and a foreign father can benefit from the new status. Foreign residents who have "given service to Qatar" or have "skills that can benefit the country will also benefit from the new status.  Those deemed eligible for the new status will be afforded the same access as Qataris to free public services, such as health and education. They will also receive preferable treatment for jobs in the government and armed forces as well as being able to own their own properties and put up commercial business without the need for a Qatari partner.  In a 2016 article, an online media group ranks Qatar as one of the highest paying countries of destination for OFWs - second only to the US.  While the new permanent residency status is not the same as a Qatari nationality, it's as close to the real thing. It is also a huge leap forward for expat relations since naturalization is extremely rare in the region and the movements, including the residency status, of the millions of foreigners working in the Gulf are strictly limited.   Rich in oil and gas, Qatar has a population of 2.4 million people. Almost 90% of that number are foreigners, including a big number from Southeast Asia working in labor and construction.  The legislation was approved after Qatar’s ruler, Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani, instructed government officials to expedite measures to lure investments and reduce the economy’s reliance on energy products in the wake of an ongoing Arab Boycott - where Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, UAE and Egypt are singling out Qatar for alleged terrorist connections, among other things.    Approving these laws doesn’t mean that implementation will swiftly follow. As of now, Qatar's Interior Ministry is setting up a department to consider applications for this new residence status.  The new law also plays an important role in keeping Qatar's international image afloat amid the diplomatic crisis with its neighbors. Portraying itself as a victim, the new law paints a picture of Qatar that is more open, forward-thinking state when compared to its neighbors, which still uses a decades-old sponsorship system known locally as "Kafala."  Others speculate that the move was aimed to embarrass the rest of the Gulf states, showing Qatar as taking the situation of human rights into account when making government decisions. They say the decision was a ploy to keep expatriates in the country. Some expats are thinking about leaving the country following the long-growing crisis that began on June 5.   Sources: GMA, Bloomberg, Reuters, Gulf News
Qatar's skyline at night. It's a sight to behold.


Others speculate that the move was aimed to embarrass the rest of the Gulf states, showing Qatar as taking the situation of human rights into account when making government decisions. They say the decision was a ploy to keep expatriates in the country. Some expats are thinking about leaving the country following the long-growing crisis that began on June 5.



Sources: GMA, Bloomberg, Reuters, Gulf News




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