"Advertisements"
SEARCH THIS SITE
SEARCH THIS SITE FOR HOUSE DESIGN, OVERSEAS FILIPINO NEWS, FREE ONLINE STUDIES, CASH LOANS and BANK LOANS, PROPERTY FOR SALE, HOUSE AND LOT, FORECLOSED, CARS FOR SALE and anything beneficial for the Filipinos at home and abroad

Saturday, May 13, 2017

RANSOMWARE - What You Need To Know To Protect Yourself

One of the biggest news today is the massive ransomware attack that spread like wildfire and affected thousand of private companies, public organizations and individuals around the globe. Ransomware attacks are not new, but the speed of the recent hacking has alarmed security experts. In a few hours, the "WannaCry"malware had already infected victims in at least 99 countries, including Russia, Turkey, Germany, Vietnam, and the Philippines - and is thought to be spreading at a rate of five million emails per hour. It is believed to be the biggest attack of this type ever recorded. Most people are not familiar with the differences between technical terms virus and malware, or phishing and hacking. Now that a huge ransomware has hit globally, it's time to learn about this latest form of attack.  What is a RansomWare?  A ransomware is a virus used to extort money from unwitting victims. It is programmed to encrypt certain files on the computer and then blackmails the user for money in exchange for the access to the files. Any files encrypted cannot be accessed or opened by the victim unless he gets the decryptor or the key to decrypt the file. Payment is usually done by electronic currency like "bitcoin," which is almost impossible to trace.  How do I get a RansomWare in my System? A ransomware is not limited to computers. Smartphones and other electronic gadgets and equipment are susceptible to ransomware or any other virus in general. Getting your system infected happens in many ways. The most common form of infection occurs via email attachments or malicious links. Opening such attachments, or clicking on malicious links, installs the ransomware in your system. It then spreads throughout the network, and can even send copies of itself through email, using the contacts listed in your system (like MS Outlook). Virus infection by USB drives are also common but the infection rate is slower and more limited locally.  How can I protect Myself from RansomWare?  There are effective ways to avoid RansomWare attacks, and most of them are actually routine. Here are some of the things you must do (on a regular basis): Use a reputable antivirus software. There are some free antivirus that you can download. They may not offer full protection, but that is better than nothing at all. Also, free antivirus is better than "pirated" copies of antivirus since the bootleg copies usually have vulnerabilities built into them by the software pirates. Set up a popup blocker. Since viruses are downloaded from malicious links that pop-up from other websites, it is a good practice to set-up a pop-up blocker. Most internet browsers today have a built-in pop-up blocker but you need to set it up yourself. Be cautious about clicking links inside emails. If you get an email from an unknown sender, it is better to ignore it or delete immediately. Even if you know the sender, be wary of the contents of the email, especially if it contains links, or if the email itself seems outside the character of the sender. Stay clear suspicious websites. Keep your browsing habits well within reputable websites. Going further into suspicious websites increases the risk you take. In some cases, you do not even have to click anything on a website, to let that site download malicious software into your PC. Update your operating system (windows) on a regular basis. It is also better if you schedule your PC to update automatically. Update your anti-virus and firewall software. Companies developing antivirus are often quick in responding to threats and usually patch their software to prevent further attacks. Encrypt your hard drive. Encrypting your hard drive yourself will prevent others from doing it, and it's you who holds the password, not some unknown criminal from another country. Back-up your files often. If you can manage to do so, keep a back-up of your most precious files off line in a separate external drive. An online storage is also recommended. If you use public wifi often, protect yourself further by masking your IP or using a VPN.  How do I know if my computer is Infected?  You will not miss a ransomware infection since it will alert you that your PC is now a hostage. The display will lock up your browser, certain folders, or the complete system. What access you have left is limited to contacting the perpetrators and providing the "ransom."  You should also be aware that some ransomware are disguised as "real" entities like Mircosoft, Antivirus companies, or even Government entities like the FBI, forcing you to pay an upgrade or fine. What to do if you suspect your computer is infected?  Disconnect your computer from the network and immediately shut down. Inform your network operator if the PC is connected to the network. This will help prevent further spread of the virus. Note the last email, file or website you have opened. Verify that you have a back up of your files offline in a hard drive or online in a cloud. Do not attempt to open your files in the same network, but instead go to another network.



In the last three months, two massive ransomware attacks spread like wildfire and affected thousand of private companies, public organizations and individuals around the globe.

Ransomware attacks are not new, but the speed of the recent hacking has alarmed security experts. In a few hours, the "WannaCry"malware had already infected victims in at least 99 countries, including Russia, Turkey, Germany, Vietnam, and the Philippines - and is thought to be spreading at a rate of five million emails per hour. It is believed to be the biggest attack of this type ever recorded. It was followed by the Petya ransomware.


Most people are not familiar with the differences between the technical terms virus and malware, or phishing and hacking. Now that a huge ransomware has hit globally, it's time to learn about this latest form of attack.


One of the biggest news today is the massive ransomware attack that spread like wildfire and affected thousand of private companies, public organizations and individuals around the globe. Ransomware attacks are not new, but the speed of the recent hacking has alarmed security experts. In a few hours, the "WannaCry"malware had already infected victims in at least 99 countries, including Russia, Turkey, Germany, Vietnam, and the Philippines - and is thought to be spreading at a rate of five million emails per hour. It is believed to be the biggest attack of this type ever recorded. Most people are not familiar with the differences between technical terms virus and malware, or phishing and hacking. Now that a huge ransomware has hit globally, it's time to learn about this latest form of attack.  What is a RansomWare?  A ransomware is a virus used to extort money from unwitting victims. It is programmed to encrypt certain files on the computer and then blackmails the user for money in exchange for the access to the files. Any files encrypted cannot be accessed or opened by the victim unless he gets the decryptor or the key to decrypt the file. Payment is usually done by electronic currency like "bitcoin," which is almost impossible to trace.  How do I get a RansomWare in my System? A ransomware is not limited to computers. Smartphones and other electronic gadgets and equipment are susceptible to ransomware or any other virus in general. Getting your system infected happens in many ways. The most common form of infection occurs via email attachments or malicious links. Opening such attachments, or clicking on malicious links, installs the ransomware in your system. It then spreads throughout the network, and can even send copies of itself through email, using the contacts listed in your system (like MS Outlook). Virus infection by USB drives are also common but the infection rate is slower and more limited locally.  How can I protect Myself from RansomWare?  There are effective ways to avoid RansomWare attacks, and most of them are actually routine. Here are some of the things you must do (on a regular basis): Use a reputable antivirus software. There are some free antivirus that you can download. They may not offer full protection, but that is better than nothing at all. Also, free antivirus is better than "pirated" copies of antivirus since the bootleg copies usually have vulnerabilities built into them by the software pirates. Set up a popup blocker. Since viruses are downloaded from malicious links that pop-up from other websites, it is a good practice to set-up a pop-up blocker. Most internet browsers today have a built-in pop-up blocker but you need to set it up yourself. Be cautious about clicking links inside emails. If you get an email from an unknown sender, it is better to ignore it or delete immediately. Even if you know the sender, be wary of the contents of the email, especially if it contains links, or if the email itself seems outside the character of the sender. Stay clear suspicious websites. Keep your browsing habits well within reputable websites. Going further into suspicious websites increases the risk you take. In some cases, you do not even have to click anything on a website, to let that site download malicious software into your PC. Update your operating system (windows) on a regular basis. It is also better if you schedule your PC to update automatically. Update your anti-virus and firewall software. Companies developing antivirus are often quick in responding to threats and usually patch their software to prevent further attacks. Encrypt your hard drive. Encrypting your hard drive yourself will prevent others from doing it, and it's you who holds the password, not some unknown criminal from another country. Back-up your files often. If you can manage to do so, keep a back-up of your most precious files off line in a separate external drive. An online storage is also recommended. If you use public wifi often, protect yourself further by masking your IP or using a VPN.  How do I know if my computer is Infected?  You will not miss a ransomware infection since it will alert you that your PC is now a hostage. The display will lock up your browser, certain folders, or the complete system. What access you have left is limited to contacting the perpetrators and providing the "ransom."  You should also be aware that some ransomware are disguised as "real" entities like Mircosoft, Antivirus companies, or even Government entities like the FBI, forcing you to pay an upgrade or fine. What to do if you suspect your computer is infected?  Disconnect your computer from the network and immediately shut down. Inform your network operator if the PC is connected to the network. This will help prevent further spread of the virus. Note the last email, file or website you have opened. If you must verify that you have a back up of your files offline in a hard drive or online in a cloud, do not attempt to open your files in the same network, but instead go to another network.







What is a RansomWare?


 A ransomware is a virus used to extort money from unwitting victims. Once it gets into a system, it restricts you from using your PC or mobile device, and from accessing your files. It is programmed to encrypt certain files on the computer and then blackmails the user for money in exchange for the access to the computer or decryption of your files. Any files encrypted cannot be accessed or opened by the victim in any other way unless he gets the key to decrypt the file. Payment is usually done by electronic currency like "bitcoin," which is almost impossible to trace. Payment of this ransom is not a guarantee that you will get full access back, nor does it guarantee safety from similar attacks in the future.

One of the biggest news today is the massive ransomware attack that spread like wildfire and affected thousand of private companies, public organizations and individuals around the globe. Ransomware attacks are not new, but the speed of the recent hacking has alarmed security experts. In a few hours, the "WannaCry"malware had already infected victims in at least 99 countries, including Russia, Turkey, Germany, Vietnam, and the Philippines - and is thought to be spreading at a rate of five million emails per hour. It is believed to be the biggest attack of this type ever recorded. Most people are not familiar with the differences between technical terms virus and malware, or phishing and hacking. Now that a huge ransomware has hit globally, it's time to learn about this latest form of attack.  What is a RansomWare?  A ransomware is a virus used to extort money from unwitting victims. It is programmed to encrypt certain files on the computer and then blackmails the user for money in exchange for the access to the files. Any files encrypted cannot be accessed or opened by the victim unless he gets the decryptor or the key to decrypt the file. Payment is usually done by electronic currency like "bitcoin," which is almost impossible to trace.  How do I get a RansomWare in my System? A ransomware is not limited to computers. Smartphones and other electronic gadgets and equipment are susceptible to ransomware or any other virus in general. Getting your system infected happens in many ways. The most common form of infection occurs via email attachments or malicious links. Opening such attachments, or clicking on malicious links, installs the ransomware in your system. It then spreads throughout the network, and can even send copies of itself through email, using the contacts listed in your system (like MS Outlook). Virus infection by USB drives are also common but the infection rate is slower and more limited locally.  How can I protect Myself from RansomWare?  There are effective ways to avoid RansomWare attacks, and most of them are actually routine. Here are some of the things you must do (on a regular basis): Use a reputable antivirus software. There are some free antivirus that you can download. They may not offer full protection, but that is better than nothing at all. Also, free antivirus is better than "pirated" copies of antivirus since the bootleg copies usually have vulnerabilities built into them by the software pirates. Set up a popup blocker. Since viruses are downloaded from malicious links that pop-up from other websites, it is a good practice to set-up a pop-up blocker. Most internet browsers today have a built-in pop-up blocker but you need to set it up yourself. Be cautious about clicking links inside emails. If you get an email from an unknown sender, it is better to ignore it or delete immediately. Even if you know the sender, be wary of the contents of the email, especially if it contains links, or if the email itself seems outside the character of the sender. Stay clear suspicious websites. Keep your browsing habits well within reputable websites. Going further into suspicious websites increases the risk you take. In some cases, you do not even have to click anything on a website, to let that site download malicious software into your PC. Update your operating system (windows) on a regular basis. It is also better if you schedule your PC to update automatically. Update your anti-virus and firewall software. Companies developing antivirus are often quick in responding to threats and usually patch their software to prevent further attacks. Encrypt your hard drive. Encrypting your hard drive yourself will prevent others from doing it, and it's you who holds the password, not some unknown criminal from another country. Back-up your files often. If you can manage to do so, keep a back-up of your most precious files off line in a separate external drive. An online storage is also recommended. If you use public wifi often, protect yourself further by masking your IP or using a VPN.  How do I know if my computer is Infected?  You will not miss a ransomware infection since it will alert you that your PC is now a hostage. The display will lock up your browser, certain folders, or the complete system. What access you have left is limited to contacting the perpetrators and providing the "ransom."  You should also be aware that some ransomware are disguised as "real" entities like Mircosoft, Antivirus companies, or even Government entities like the FBI, forcing you to pay an upgrade or fine. What to do if you suspect your computer is infected?  Disconnect your computer from the network and immediately shut down. Inform your network operator if the PC is connected to the network. This will help prevent further spread of the virus. Note the last email, file or website you have opened. Verify that you have a back up of your files offline in a hard drive or online in a cloud. Do not attempt to open your files in the same network, but instead go to another network.


How do I get a RansomWare in my System?

A ransomware is not limited to computers. Smartphones and other electronic gadgets and equipment are susceptible to ransomware or any other virus in general. Getting your system infected happens in many ways. The most common form of infection occurs via email attachments or malicious links. Opening such attachments, or clicking on malicious links, installs the ransomware in your system. It then spreads throughout the network, and can even send copies of itself through email, using the contacts listed in your system (like MS Outlook). Virus infection by USB drives are also common but the infection rate is slower and more limited locally.




One of the biggest news today is the massive ransomware attack that spread like wildfire and affected thousand of private companies, public organizations and individuals around the globe. Ransomware attacks are not new, but the speed of the recent hacking has alarmed security experts. In a few hours, the "WannaCry"malware had already infected victims in at least 99 countries, including Russia, Turkey, Germany, Vietnam, and the Philippines - and is thought to be spreading at a rate of five million emails per hour. It is believed to be the biggest attack of this type ever recorded. Most people are not familiar with the differences between technical terms virus and malware, or phishing and hacking. Now that a huge ransomware has hit globally, it's time to learn about this latest form of attack.  What is a RansomWare?  A ransomware is a virus used to extort money from unwitting victims. It is programmed to encrypt certain files on the computer and then blackmails the user for money in exchange for the access to the files. Any files encrypted cannot be accessed or opened by the victim unless he gets the decryptor or the key to decrypt the file. Payment is usually done by electronic currency like "bitcoin," which is almost impossible to trace.  How do I get a RansomWare in my System? A ransomware is not limited to computers. Smartphones and other electronic gadgets and equipment are susceptible to ransomware or any other virus in general. Getting your system infected happens in many ways. The most common form of infection occurs via email attachments or malicious links. Opening such attachments, or clicking on malicious links, installs the ransomware in your system. It then spreads throughout the network, and can even send copies of itself through email, using the contacts listed in your system (like MS Outlook). Virus infection by USB drives are also common but the infection rate is slower and more limited locally.  How can I protect Myself from RansomWare?  There are effective ways to avoid RansomWare attacks, and most of them are actually routine. Here are some of the things you must do (on a regular basis): Use a reputable antivirus software. There are some free antivirus that you can download. They may not offer full protection, but that is better than nothing at all. Also, free antivirus is better than "pirated" copies of antivirus since the bootleg copies usually have vulnerabilities built into them by the software pirates. Set up a popup blocker. Since viruses are downloaded from malicious links that pop-up from other websites, it is a good practice to set-up a pop-up blocker. Most internet browsers today have a built-in pop-up blocker but you need to set it up yourself. Be cautious about clicking links inside emails. If you get an email from an unknown sender, it is better to ignore it or delete immediately. Even if you know the sender, be wary of the contents of the email, especially if it contains links, or if the email itself seems outside the character of the sender. Stay clear suspicious websites. Keep your browsing habits well within reputable websites. Going further into suspicious websites increases the risk you take. In some cases, you do not even have to click anything on a website, to let that site download malicious software into your PC. Update your operating system (windows) on a regular basis. It is also better if you schedule your PC to update automatically. Update your anti-virus and firewall software. Companies developing antivirus are often quick in responding to threats and usually patch their software to prevent further attacks. Encrypt your hard drive. Encrypting your hard drive yourself will prevent others from doing it, and it's you who holds the password, not some unknown criminal from another country. Back-up your files often. If you can manage to do so, keep a back-up of your most precious files off line in a separate external drive. An online storage is also recommended. If you use public wifi often, protect yourself further by masking your IP or using a VPN.  How do I know if my computer is Infected?  You will not miss a ransomware infection since it will alert you that your PC is now a hostage. The display will lock up your browser, certain folders, or the complete system. What access you have left is limited to contacting the perpetrators and providing the "ransom."  You should also be aware that some ransomware are disguised as "real" entities like Mircosoft, Antivirus companies, or even Government entities like the FBI, forcing you to pay an upgrade or fine. What to do if you suspect your computer is infected?  Disconnect your computer from the network and immediately shut down. Inform your network operator if the PC is connected to the network. This will help prevent further spread of the virus. Note the last email, file or website you have opened. If you must verify that you have a back up of your files offline in a hard drive or online in a cloud, do not attempt to open your files in the same network, but instead go to another network.

How can I protect Myself from RansomWare?

There are effective ways to avoid RansomWare attacks, and most of them are actually routine. Here are some of the things you must do (on a regular basis):

One of the biggest news today is the massive ransomware attack that spread like wildfire and affected thousand of private companies, public organizations and individuals around the globe. Ransomware attacks are not new, but the speed of the recent hacking has alarmed security experts. In a few hours, the "WannaCry"malware had already infected victims in at least 99 countries, including Russia, Turkey, Germany, Vietnam, and the Philippines - and is thought to be spreading at a rate of five million emails per hour. It is believed to be the biggest attack of this type ever recorded. Most people are not familiar with the differences between technical terms virus and malware, or phishing and hacking. Now that a huge ransomware has hit globally, it's time to learn about this latest form of attack.  What is a RansomWare?  A ransomware is a virus used to extort money from unwitting victims. It is programmed to encrypt certain files on the computer and then blackmails the user for money in exchange for the access to the files. Any files encrypted cannot be accessed or opened by the victim unless he gets the decryptor or the key to decrypt the file. Payment is usually done by electronic currency like "bitcoin," which is almost impossible to trace.  How do I get a RansomWare in my System? A ransomware is not limited to computers. Smartphones and other electronic gadgets and equipment are susceptible to ransomware or any other virus in general. Getting your system infected happens in many ways. The most common form of infection occurs via email attachments or malicious links. Opening such attachments, or clicking on malicious links, installs the ransomware in your system. It then spreads throughout the network, and can even send copies of itself through email, using the contacts listed in your system (like MS Outlook). Virus infection by USB drives are also common but the infection rate is slower and more limited locally.  How can I protect Myself from RansomWare?  There are effective ways to avoid RansomWare attacks, and most of them are actually routine. Here are some of the things you must do (on a regular basis): Use a reputable antivirus software. There are some free antivirus that you can download. They may not offer full protection, but that is better than nothing at all. Also, free antivirus is better than "pirated" copies of antivirus since the bootleg copies usually have vulnerabilities built into them by the software pirates. Set up a popup blocker. Since viruses are downloaded from malicious links that pop-up from other websites, it is a good practice to set-up a pop-up blocker. Most internet browsers today have a built-in pop-up blocker but you need to set it up yourself. Be cautious about clicking links inside emails. If you get an email from an unknown sender, it is better to ignore it or delete immediately. Even if you know the sender, be wary of the contents of the email, especially if it contains links, or if the email itself seems outside the character of the sender. Stay clear suspicious websites. Keep your browsing habits well within reputable websites. Going further into suspicious websites increases the risk you take. In some cases, you do not even have to click anything on a website, to let that site download malicious software into your PC. Update your operating system (windows) on a regular basis. It is also better if you schedule your PC to update automatically. Update your anti-virus and firewall software. Companies developing antivirus are often quick in responding to threats and usually patch their software to prevent further attacks. Encrypt your hard drive. Encrypting your hard drive yourself will prevent others from doing it, and it's you who holds the password, not some unknown criminal from another country. Back-up your files often. If you can manage to do so, keep a back-up of your most precious files off line in a separate external drive. An online storage is also recommended. If you use public wifi often, protect yourself further by masking your IP or using a VPN.  How do I know if my computer is Infected?  You will not miss a ransomware infection since it will alert you that your PC is now a hostage. The display will lock up your browser, certain folders, or the complete system. What access you have left is limited to contacting the perpetrators and providing the "ransom."  You should also be aware that some ransomware are disguised as "real" entities like Mircosoft, Antivirus companies, or even Government entities like the FBI, forcing you to pay an upgrade or fine. What to do if you suspect your computer is infected?  Disconnect your computer from the network and immediately shut down. Inform your network operator if the PC is connected to the network. This will help prevent further spread of the virus. Note the last email, file or website you have opened. If you must verify that you have a back up of your files offline in a hard drive or online in a cloud, do not attempt to open your files in the same network, but instead go to another network.
  1. Use a reputable antivirus software. There are some free antivirus that you can download. They may not offer full protection, but that is better than nothing at all. Also, free antivirus is better than "pirated" copies of antivirus since the bootleg copies usually have vulnerabilities built into them by the software pirates.
  2. Set up a popup blocker. Since viruses are downloaded from malicious links that pop-up from other websites, it is a good practice to set-up a pop-up blocker. Most internet browsers today have a built-in pop-up blocker but you need to set it up yourself.
  3. Be cautious about clicking links and attachments. If you get an email from an unknown sender, it is better to ignore it or delete immediately. Even if you know the sender, be wary of the contents of the email, especially if it contains links, or if the email itself seems outside the character of the sender.
  4. Stay clear suspicious websites. Keep your browsing habits well within reputable websites. Going further into suspicious websites increases the risk you take. In some cases, you do not even have to click anything on a website, to let that site download malicious software into your PC.
  5. Update your operating system (windows) on a regular basis. It is also better if you schedule your PC to update automatically.
  6. Update your anti-virus and firewall software. Companies developing antivirus are often quick in responding to threats and usually patch their software to prevent further attacks.
  7. Encrypt your hard drive. Encrypting your hard drive yourself will prevent others from doing it, and it's you who holds the password, not some unknown criminal from another country.
  8. Back-up your files often. If you can manage to do so, keep a back-up of your most precious files off line in a separate external drive. An online storage is also recommended.
  9. If you use public wifi often, protect yourself further by masking your IP or using a VPN.
One of the biggest news today is the massive ransomware attack that spread like wildfire and affected thousand of private companies, public organizations and individuals around the globe. Ransomware attacks are not new, but the speed of the recent hacking has alarmed security experts. In a few hours, the "WannaCry"malware had already infected victims in at least 99 countries, including Russia, Turkey, Germany, Vietnam, and the Philippines - and is thought to be spreading at a rate of five million emails per hour. It is believed to be the biggest attack of this type ever recorded. Most people are not familiar with the differences between technical terms virus and malware, or phishing and hacking. Now that a huge ransomware has hit globally, it's time to learn about this latest form of attack.  What is a RansomWare?  A ransomware is a virus used to extort money from unwitting victims. It is programmed to encrypt certain files on the computer and then blackmails the user for money in exchange for the access to the files. Any files encrypted cannot be accessed or opened by the victim unless he gets the decryptor or the key to decrypt the file. Payment is usually done by electronic currency like "bitcoin," which is almost impossible to trace.  How do I get a RansomWare in my System? A ransomware is not limited to computers. Smartphones and other electronic gadgets and equipment are susceptible to ransomware or any other virus in general. Getting your system infected happens in many ways. The most common form of infection occurs via email attachments or malicious links. Opening such attachments, or clicking on malicious links, installs the ransomware in your system. It then spreads throughout the network, and can even send copies of itself through email, using the contacts listed in your system (like MS Outlook). Virus infection by USB drives are also common but the infection rate is slower and more limited locally.  How can I protect Myself from RansomWare?  There are effective ways to avoid RansomWare attacks, and most of them are actually routine. Here are some of the things you must do (on a regular basis): Use a reputable antivirus software. There are some free antivirus that you can download. They may not offer full protection, but that is better than nothing at all. Also, free antivirus is better than "pirated" copies of antivirus since the bootleg copies usually have vulnerabilities built into them by the software pirates. Set up a popup blocker. Since viruses are downloaded from malicious links that pop-up from other websites, it is a good practice to set-up a pop-up blocker. Most internet browsers today have a built-in pop-up blocker but you need to set it up yourself. Be cautious about clicking links inside emails. If you get an email from an unknown sender, it is better to ignore it or delete immediately. Even if you know the sender, be wary of the contents of the email, especially if it contains links, or if the email itself seems outside the character of the sender. Stay clear suspicious websites. Keep your browsing habits well within reputable websites. Going further into suspicious websites increases the risk you take. In some cases, you do not even have to click anything on a website, to let that site download malicious software into your PC. Update your operating system (windows) on a regular basis. It is also better if you schedule your PC to update automatically. Update your anti-virus and firewall software. Companies developing antivirus are often quick in responding to threats and usually patch their software to prevent further attacks. Encrypt your hard drive. Encrypting your hard drive yourself will prevent others from doing it, and it's you who holds the password, not some unknown criminal from another country. Back-up your files often. If you can manage to do so, keep a back-up of your most precious files off line in a separate external drive. An online storage is also recommended. If you use public wifi often, protect yourself further by masking your IP or using a VPN.  How do I know if my computer is Infected?  You will not miss a ransomware infection since it will alert you that your PC is now a hostage. The display will lock up your browser, certain folders, or the complete system. What access you have left is limited to contacting the perpetrators and providing the "ransom."  You should also be aware that some ransomware are disguised as "real" entities like Mircosoft, Antivirus companies, or even Government entities like the FBI, forcing you to pay an upgrade or fine. What to do if you suspect your computer is infected?  Disconnect your computer from the network and immediately shut down. Inform your network operator if the PC is connected to the network. This will help prevent further spread of the virus. Note the last email, file or website you have opened. If you must verify that you have a back up of your files offline in a hard drive or online in a cloud, do not attempt to open your files in the same network, but instead go to another network.


How do I know if my computer is Infected?

You will not miss a ransomware infection since it will alert you that your PC is now a hostage. The display will lock up your browser, certain folders, or the complete system. What access you have left is limited to contacting the perpetrators and providing the "ransom."
One of the biggest news today is the massive ransomware attack that spread like wildfire and affected thousand of private companies, public organizations and individuals around the globe. Ransomware attacks are not new, but the speed of the recent hacking has alarmed security experts. In a few hours, the "WannaCry"malware had already infected victims in at least 99 countries, including Russia, Turkey, Germany, Vietnam, and the Philippines - and is thought to be spreading at a rate of five million emails per hour. It is believed to be the biggest attack of this type ever recorded. Most people are not familiar with the differences between technical terms virus and malware, or phishing and hacking. Now that a huge ransomware has hit globally, it's time to learn about this latest form of attack.  What is a RansomWare?  A ransomware is a virus used to extort money from unwitting victims. It is programmed to encrypt certain files on the computer and then blackmails the user for money in exchange for the access to the files. Any files encrypted cannot be accessed or opened by the victim unless he gets the decryptor or the key to decrypt the file. Payment is usually done by electronic currency like "bitcoin," which is almost impossible to trace.  How do I get a RansomWare in my System? A ransomware is not limited to computers. Smartphones and other electronic gadgets and equipment are susceptible to ransomware or any other virus in general. Getting your system infected happens in many ways. The most common form of infection occurs via email attachments or malicious links. Opening such attachments, or clicking on malicious links, installs the ransomware in your system. It then spreads throughout the network, and can even send copies of itself through email, using the contacts listed in your system (like MS Outlook). Virus infection by USB drives are also common but the infection rate is slower and more limited locally.  How can I protect Myself from RansomWare?  There are effective ways to avoid RansomWare attacks, and most of them are actually routine. Here are some of the things you must do (on a regular basis): Use a reputable antivirus software. There are some free antivirus that you can download. They may not offer full protection, but that is better than nothing at all. Also, free antivirus is better than "pirated" copies of antivirus since the bootleg copies usually have vulnerabilities built into them by the software pirates. Set up a popup blocker. Since viruses are downloaded from malicious links that pop-up from other websites, it is a good practice to set-up a pop-up blocker. Most internet browsers today have a built-in pop-up blocker but you need to set it up yourself. Be cautious about clicking links inside emails. If you get an email from an unknown sender, it is better to ignore it or delete immediately. Even if you know the sender, be wary of the contents of the email, especially if it contains links, or if the email itself seems outside the character of the sender. Stay clear suspicious websites. Keep your browsing habits well within reputable websites. Going further into suspicious websites increases the risk you take. In some cases, you do not even have to click anything on a website, to let that site download malicious software into your PC. Update your operating system (windows) on a regular basis. It is also better if you schedule your PC to update automatically. Update your anti-virus and firewall software. Companies developing antivirus are often quick in responding to threats and usually patch their software to prevent further attacks. Encrypt your hard drive. Encrypting your hard drive yourself will prevent others from doing it, and it's you who holds the password, not some unknown criminal from another country. Back-up your files often. If you can manage to do so, keep a back-up of your most precious files off line in a separate external drive. An online storage is also recommended. If you use public wifi often, protect yourself further by masking your IP or using a VPN.  How do I know if my computer is Infected?  You will not miss a ransomware infection since it will alert you that your PC is now a hostage. The display will lock up your browser, certain folders, or the complete system. What access you have left is limited to contacting the perpetrators and providing the "ransom."  You should also be aware that some ransomware are disguised as "real" entities like Mircosoft, Antivirus companies, or even Government entities like the FBI, forcing you to pay an upgrade or fine. What to do if you suspect your computer is infected?  Disconnect your computer from the network and immediately shut down. Inform your network operator if the PC is connected to the network. This will help prevent further spread of the virus. Note the last email, file or website you have opened. If you must verify that you have a back up of your files offline in a hard drive or online in a cloud, do not attempt to open your files in the same network, but instead go to another network.

You should also be aware that some ransomware are disguised as "real" entities like Mircosoft, Antivirus companies, or even Government entities like the FBI, forcing you to pay an upgrade or fine.


One of the biggest news today is the massive ransomware attack that spread like wildfire and affected thousand of private companies, public organizations and individuals around the globe. Ransomware attacks are not new, but the speed of the recent hacking has alarmed security experts. In a few hours, the "WannaCry"malware had already infected victims in at least 99 countries, including Russia, Turkey, Germany, Vietnam, and the Philippines - and is thought to be spreading at a rate of five million emails per hour. It is believed to be the biggest attack of this type ever recorded. Most people are not familiar with the differences between technical terms virus and malware, or phishing and hacking. Now that a huge ransomware has hit globally, it's time to learn about this latest form of attack.  What is a RansomWare?  A ransomware is a virus used to extort money from unwitting victims. It is programmed to encrypt certain files on the computer and then blackmails the user for money in exchange for the access to the files. Any files encrypted cannot be accessed or opened by the victim unless he gets the decryptor or the key to decrypt the file. Payment is usually done by electronic currency like "bitcoin," which is almost impossible to trace.  How do I get a RansomWare in my System? A ransomware is not limited to computers. Smartphones and other electronic gadgets and equipment are susceptible to ransomware or any other virus in general. Getting your system infected happens in many ways. The most common form of infection occurs via email attachments or malicious links. Opening such attachments, or clicking on malicious links, installs the ransomware in your system. It then spreads throughout the network, and can even send copies of itself through email, using the contacts listed in your system (like MS Outlook). Virus infection by USB drives are also common but the infection rate is slower and more limited locally.  How can I protect Myself from RansomWare?  There are effective ways to avoid RansomWare attacks, and most of them are actually routine. Here are some of the things you must do (on a regular basis): Use a reputable antivirus software. There are some free antivirus that you can download. They may not offer full protection, but that is better than nothing at all. Also, free antivirus is better than "pirated" copies of antivirus since the bootleg copies usually have vulnerabilities built into them by the software pirates. Set up a popup blocker. Since viruses are downloaded from malicious links that pop-up from other websites, it is a good practice to set-up a pop-up blocker. Most internet browsers today have a built-in pop-up blocker but you need to set it up yourself. Be cautious about clicking links inside emails. If you get an email from an unknown sender, it is better to ignore it or delete immediately. Even if you know the sender, be wary of the contents of the email, especially if it contains links, or if the email itself seems outside the character of the sender. Stay clear suspicious websites. Keep your browsing habits well within reputable websites. Going further into suspicious websites increases the risk you take. In some cases, you do not even have to click anything on a website, to let that site download malicious software into your PC. Update your operating system (windows) on a regular basis. It is also better if you schedule your PC to update automatically. Update your anti-virus and firewall software. Companies developing antivirus are often quick in responding to threats and usually patch their software to prevent further attacks. Encrypt your hard drive. Encrypting your hard drive yourself will prevent others from doing it, and it's you who holds the password, not some unknown criminal from another country. Back-up your files often. If you can manage to do so, keep a back-up of your most precious files off line in a separate external drive. An online storage is also recommended. If you use public wifi often, protect yourself further by masking your IP or using a VPN.  How do I know if my computer is Infected?  You will not miss a ransomware infection since it will alert you that your PC is now a hostage. The display will lock up your browser, certain folders, or the complete system. What access you have left is limited to contacting the perpetrators and providing the "ransom."  You should also be aware that some ransomware are disguised as "real" entities like Mircosoft, Antivirus companies, or even Government entities like the FBI, forcing you to pay an upgrade or fine. What to do if you suspect your computer is infected?  Disconnect your computer from the network and immediately shut down. Inform your network operator if the PC is connected to the network. This will help prevent further spread of the virus. Note the last email, file or website you have opened. Verify that you have a back up of your files offline in a hard drive or online in a cloud. Do not attempt to open your files in the same network, but instead go to another network.



What to do if you suspect your computer is infected?

  1. Disconnect your computer from the network and immediately shut down.
  2. Inform your network operator if the PC is connected to the network. This will help prevent further spread of the virus.
  3. Note the last email, file or website you have opened.
  4. If you must verify that you have a back up of your files offline in a hard drive or online in a cloud, do not attempt to open your files in the same network, but instead go to another network.
One of the biggest news today is the massive ransomware attack that spread like wildfire and affected thousand of private companies, public organizations and individuals around the globe. Ransomware attacks are not new, but the speed of the recent hacking has alarmed security experts. In a few hours, the "WannaCry"malware had already infected victims in at least 99 countries, including Russia, Turkey, Germany, Vietnam, and the Philippines - and is thought to be spreading at a rate of five million emails per hour. It is believed to be the biggest attack of this type ever recorded. Most people are not familiar with the differences between technical terms virus and malware, or phishing and hacking. Now that a huge ransomware has hit globally, it's time to learn about this latest form of attack.  What is a RansomWare?  A ransomware is a virus used to extort money from unwitting victims. It is programmed to encrypt certain files on the computer and then blackmails the user for money in exchange for the access to the files. Any files encrypted cannot be accessed or opened by the victim unless he gets the decryptor or the key to decrypt the file. Payment is usually done by electronic currency like "bitcoin," which is almost impossible to trace.  How do I get a RansomWare in my System? A ransomware is not limited to computers. Smartphones and other electronic gadgets and equipment are susceptible to ransomware or any other virus in general. Getting your system infected happens in many ways. The most common form of infection occurs via email attachments or malicious links. Opening such attachments, or clicking on malicious links, installs the ransomware in your system. It then spreads throughout the network, and can even send copies of itself through email, using the contacts listed in your system (like MS Outlook). Virus infection by USB drives are also common but the infection rate is slower and more limited locally.  How can I protect Myself from RansomWare?  There are effective ways to avoid RansomWare attacks, and most of them are actually routine. Here are some of the things you must do (on a regular basis): Use a reputable antivirus software. There are some free antivirus that you can download. They may not offer full protection, but that is better than nothing at all. Also, free antivirus is better than "pirated" copies of antivirus since the bootleg copies usually have vulnerabilities built into them by the software pirates. Set up a popup blocker. Since viruses are downloaded from malicious links that pop-up from other websites, it is a good practice to set-up a pop-up blocker. Most internet browsers today have a built-in pop-up blocker but you need to set it up yourself. Be cautious about clicking links inside emails. If you get an email from an unknown sender, it is better to ignore it or delete immediately. Even if you know the sender, be wary of the contents of the email, especially if it contains links, or if the email itself seems outside the character of the sender. Stay clear suspicious websites. Keep your browsing habits well within reputable websites. Going further into suspicious websites increases the risk you take. In some cases, you do not even have to click anything on a website, to let that site download malicious software into your PC. Update your operating system (windows) on a regular basis. It is also better if you schedule your PC to update automatically. Update your anti-virus and firewall software. Companies developing antivirus are often quick in responding to threats and usually patch their software to prevent further attacks. Encrypt your hard drive. Encrypting your hard drive yourself will prevent others from doing it, and it's you who holds the password, not some unknown criminal from another country. Back-up your files often. If you can manage to do so, keep a back-up of your most precious files off line in a separate external drive. An online storage is also recommended. If you use public wifi often, protect yourself further by masking your IP or using a VPN.  How do I know if my computer is Infected?  You will not miss a ransomware infection since it will alert you that your PC is now a hostage. The display will lock up your browser, certain folders, or the complete system. What access you have left is limited to contacting the perpetrators and providing the "ransom."  You should also be aware that some ransomware are disguised as "real" entities like Mircosoft, Antivirus companies, or even Government entities like the FBI, forcing you to pay an upgrade or fine. What to do if you suspect your computer is infected?  Disconnect your computer from the network and immediately shut down. Inform your network operator if the PC is connected to the network. This will help prevent further spread of the virus. Note the last email, file or website you have opened. If you must verify that you have a back up of your files offline in a hard drive or online in a cloud, do not attempt to open your files in the same network, but instead go to another network.


source: MB, DailyMail





OFWs In Saudi Arabia Are Now Limited To Having Only Two SIM Cards

Saudi Arabia has imposed limits on the number of prepaid SIM cards registered for citizens and foreigners, restrictions that the regulator said aim to prevent the use of cards in carrying out militant attacks in the kingdom.  This move also comes after a massive nationwide campaign of sim card verification by linking each sim card to the fingerprint of its owner. Millions of foreign residents, including the hundreds of thousands of OFWs, are now limited to two prepaid SIM cards across all operators. The limit applies to both voice (call) and data (internet) lines in a country where a majority of expats rely on data SIMs for Internet. Saudis are restricted to a more generous amount of 10 prepaid SIM cards.  Expats who have more than two sim cards which are already verified, will not be affected and will be allowed to keep their existing sim cards. They will not however be able to buy and register a new sim card in their name, until the authorities lift the limits.  “This is considered a temporary procedure to correct and remedy the large number of illegal SIM cards in the market,” the Communications and Information Technology Commission, Saudi Arabia’s telecommunications regulator, said in a statement.  "Illegal SIM cards have been used to carry out terrorist operations and other acts harmful to national security." they further said. The move is likely to hit telecom firms which are already going through a tough time.  Shares in Mobily and  Zain have went down. The kingdom's largets network, Saudi Telecom Company slashed a portion of its profits.  The move will also likely raise the ire of consumers since it is the latest in a string of decisions in which consumers have been forced to wait in long lines just to verify their information and submit their fingerprint.  A few months back, mobile service providers have also scaled-back their unlimited internet plans, thereby raising internet costs to consumers. This happened even as increasing number of data-sim users are complaining of slow internet speeds due to network congestion.


ATM Skimming is a modus operandi where criminals use an “ATM skimmer” - a malicious device attached to an ATM - to steal your money. When you use a compromised ATM machine, the skimmer will copy the information in your card's magnetic strip. A hidden camera or a fake keypad will then capture your PIN as you enter it. If you use ATMs often, then you should be aware of these high tech method criminals use to steal your money easily. It’s used to be easy to spot ATM skimmers. But with improving technology, including 3D printing, skimming devices are getting harder to detect. The best you can do is to protect your PIN so ATM skimmers won’t be able to capture it. How ATM Skimmers Work  An ATM skimmer has two components. The first is a small device that’s generally inserted over the ATM card slot. When you insert your ATM card, the device creates a copy of the data on the magnetic strip of your card. The card passes through the device and enters the machine, so everything will appear to be functioning normally –but your card data has just been copied. The second part of the device is a small camera. A pinhole camera is placed at the top of the ATM’s screen, just above the number pad, or to the side of the pad. The camera is facing the keypad and it captures you entering your PIN. The ATM appears to be functioning normally, but the attackers just copied your card’s magnetic strip and your PIN. The attackers can use this data to program a bogus ATM card with the magnetic strip data and use it in ATM machines, entering your PIN and withdrawing money from your bank accounts. ATM skimmers are becoming more and more sophisticated. Instead of a device fitted over a card slot, a skimmer may be a small, unnoticeable device inserted into the card slot itself. Instead of a camera pointed at the keypad, the attackers may be using an overlay — a fake keyboard fitted over the real keypad. When you press a button on the fake keypad, it logs the button you pressed and presses the real button underneath. These are harder to detect. Unlike a camera, they’re also guaranteed to capture your PIN. ATM skimmers generally store the data they capture on the device itself. The criminals have to come back and retrieve the skimmer to get the data it’s captured. However, more ATM skimmers are now transmitting this data over wireless devices like Bluetooth or even cellular data connections. How to Spot ATM Skimmers  Check around the ATM Machine, if there are any devices like modems or routers hidden beside or behind the machine. Take a quick look at the ATM machine. Does anything look a bit out-of-place? Perhaps the bottom panel is a different color or looks new compared to the rest of the machine because it’s a fake piece of plastic placed over the real bottom panel and the keypad. Perhaps there’s an odd-looking object that contains a camera. Are there visible traces of glue, tape or other sticking materials around edges? Jiggle the Card Reader: If the card reader moves around when you try to jiggle it with your hand, something probably isn’t right. A real card reader should be attached to the ATM so well that it won’t move around — a skimmer overlaid over the card reader may move around. Examine the Keypad: Does the keypad look a bit too thick, or different from how it usually looks if you’ve used the machine before? Does it look too clean or too new compared to the machine itself? Normal wear and tear usually makes the keypad dirty and the numbers faded out. A good looking and spotless keypad may be an overlay over the real keypad. Basic Security Precautions here’s what you should always do to protect yourself when using any ATM machine:  Avoid using machines in places that are dark, rural, and with very few to no people around. ATMs within the bank premises are generally more safe than those found elsewhere, but this is not always the case. ATMs in malls are also usually safe, unless the location is in a corridor far from view of the people. If you can, check and compare the ATM you are using with the one beside it, to see any difference. If you find some discrepancies, play safe and find another machine. Shield Your PIN With Your Hand, bag or wallet. Learn how to enter the PIN without looking at the pad. This might not protect you against the most sophisticated skimmers that use keypad overlays, but you’re much more likely to run into an ATM skimmer that uses a camera — they’re much cheaper to purchase. This is the easiest tip you can use to protect yourself. Monitor Your Bank Account Transactions: You should regularly check your bank accounts and credit card accounts online. Check for suspicious transactions and notify your bank as quickly as possible. You want to catch these problems as soon as possible — don’t wait until your bank mails you a printed statement a month after money has been withdrawn from your account by a criminal. If your bank has it, subscribe to SMS notifications, whereby you will receive a text message each time a withdrawal or deposit is made on your account. If you suspect that an ATM machine is compromised, report it to the bank or nearest police station. Skimming usually happens around salary and bonus dates, holidays, and days when people usually spend money (school enrollment, bills payment). ATMs in remote areas or areas with very few people are often chosen by criminals to install their skimming devices. ATMs in tourist spots are also more common since people using ATMs here are not locals. Now that you have an idea about skimming, test yourself with these images. Which of these machines have an ATM Skimming device attached to it?

The Philippine Science High School is the country's leading science-based high school in the Asia Pacific region that provides scholarships to students with high aptitudes in science and mathematics. PSHS prepares its scholars to become globally-competitive Filipino scientists and engineers. The school system offers an education that is humanistic in spirit, global in perspective and patriotic in orientation. It is based on a curriculum that emphasizes science and mathematics, and the development of well-rounded individuals. The PSHS prepares its students for careers in Science and Technology and contributes to nation building by helping the country attain a critical mass of professionals and leaders in Science and Technology. What are the Benefits of a PSHS Scholar?  Free tuition fee Free loan of textbooks Monthly stipend of P4,000 Annual Uniform Allowance of P1,800 (for low income groups) Annual transportation allowance (for low income groups) Living allowance OR Free Dormitory Accommodation (for low income groups) Who are Eligible to Apply for Scholarship?  A grade six (6) elementary pupil from a duly recognized school by the Department of Education, who meets the following criteria is eligible to apply for the PSHS National Competitive Examination (NCE). He/She must: have a final grade of 85% or better in Science and Mathematics, evidenced by the student's report card. If the student's grades in Science or Math are below 85%, then he/she must provide evidence that he/she belongs to the upper 10% of the batch; be a Filipino citizen with no pending or approved application as immigrant to any foreign country; be born on or after August 1, 2003; have at least a satisfactory rating (or its equivalent) in his/her Character Rating in his/her report card (SY 2016-2017); not have taken the PSHS NCE previously; and preferably, be in good health and fit to undergo a rigorous academic program. What are the Requirements? Fully accomplished Application Form in two (2) copies Two (2) identical recent 1 x 1 ID pictures Non-refundable test fee of P100 for private school students. Public school students are free. Certified true copy of report card (SY 2016-2017) by the class adviser/principal If the final grades in Science or Math are below 85%, certification or proof that the child belongs to the upper 10% of the batch. What is the Screening Process?  The National Competitive Examination is the only test to be administered to prospective scholars. It is a scholastic aptitude test designed to measure Scientific Ability, Quantitative Ability, Abstract Reasoning and Verbal Aptitude. The NCE will be administered on October 21, 2017 What is the Application Process?  The PSHS NCE Application Form and the accompanying materials (sample test questions) are not for sale, may be photocopied, and may be downloaded through this link. No reservation fee is required.  Application forms are also available and may be filed at any of the following: PSHS campuses, DOST Regional offices, or Provincial Science and Technology Offices. Application forms with incomplete information will not be processed.  Erasures, alterations and insertions must be initialed by the applicant. The Examination Permit/s will be issued to the applicants upon completion of all documents by the campus where the application was processed.  For applications filed with DOST agencies, the exam permits will be mailed to the applicant, or to the School Principal for distribution to its applicant/s.  In case the exam permits are not received two (2) weeks before the examination day, the applicants should check with the nearest PSHS campus, DOST Regional Office, DOST Provincial Science and Technology Office, or the PSHS System Admissions Office. The deadline for filing application is on September 1, 2017. The date of the examination is on October 21, 2017.



©2017 THOUGHTSKOTO

SEARCH JBSOLIS

OUR POPULAR CONTENT