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Wednesday, October 24, 2018

Countries Where It’s Super Easy To Immigrate To If You Live In The Philippines

Moving abroad permanently may not be the easiest thing in the world, it’s also not as hard as many people would think. In some countries, acquiring residency is so easy. Filipinos, in general, seems to have a strong inclination in finding the right country for migration, may it be for finding a better job abroad or to find a country where they would choose to spend the rest of their lives.
Do you know that there are countries where migration is extremely easy?

Moving abroad permanently may not be the easiest thing in the world, it’s also not as hard as many people would think. In some countries, acquiring residency is so easy. Filipinos, in general, seems to have a strong inclination in finding the right country for migration, may it be for finding a better job abroad or to find a country where they would choose to spend the rest of their lives.  Do you know that there are countries where migration is extremely easy?        Ads     Sponsored Links    Ecuador A land of boiling volcanoes, soaring mountain peaks, and old pastel-colored colonial towns, Ecuador is exactly the sort of over-romanticized stereotype of Latin America you’ve always secretly held in your head. It’s got beaches. Islands. Mayan ruins. An adorably underperforming soccer team. It’s got a remarkably low cost of living, and the US dollar as a currency.  This little slice of the south of the border paradise could be your new home for as little as $800 per month. That’s not costs you gotta pay out. That’s all the income you have to prove you have in order to move to Ecuador.  This is, however, is a requirement for Ecuador’s pensioner visa, not for a general one. Ecuador has no minimum age requirements on pensioner visas, and those claiming they don’t need to even prove they have a pension. You’ve just gotta show that $800 will be landing in your bank account every single month for perpetuity and you’re in. This kinda begs the questions as to why they call it a ‘pensioner visa’, but who are we to argue? The low requirement means people with trust funds, compensation pay outs, and royalties are all able to net an easy visa (probably, don’t quote us on that last one).    Austria  Migrating in Austria is not recommended for those who like their homes nice and cheap. The former seat of Habsburg imperial power, Austria is a tiny country that operates a whole lot like a hipster crafts store: small, fascinating to look at, and so expensive.  Yet Austria does have one thing a hipster store doesn’t have. According to The Telegraph, Austria offers over 10 different types of residence permits. The best part? Absolutely none of them require any form of inward investment.  The bad news is that you need to apply for your residence card abroad (i.e. not in Austria). The good news is this doesn’t apply to EU citizens or Americans. If you’re an American, you can just get a D-Visa, giving you up to 6 months’ leave to stay in the country, then go to Austria, secure a job/wife, and then apply for a proper residence visa. Just remember to smile smugly at all those struggling Canadians and Australians as you waltz your way to the front of the immigration line.    Belgium Germany’s go-to country to invade after Poland, tiny Belgium is one of northern Europe’s tiniest states. Slightly smaller than Maryland, it boasts a whole lotta flat and whole lotta roads. On the other hand, it also has some of the most attractive small towns on the continent. It’s also fairly easy to get a long-term residency. The one thing you have to do? Get a job.  In Belgium, not only will they let you apply for work as an outsider, they’ll then offer you a residency permit after just two weeks of employment. This isn’t a permanent residency permit but it’s certainly a step in the right direction. All you gotta do next is hold onto your job for long enough (it varies by region), and you’ll be laughing all the way to the Belgian citizenship test. The only downside is you need to actually be employable for this plan to work.    Paraguay Nothing could be simpler than getting residency in Paraguay. Probably thanks to its terminal obscurity, the government seems desperate to get as many people into the landlocked South American nation as possible. As a result, there’s only one hard and fast requirement. You need to deposit money in a Paraguayan bank. A small amount won’t do, but you don’t have to go too big. Around 35 times the monthly minimum wage is the accepted sum (between $4,500-$5,500 USD). Of the 6 million or so people who live there, at least half of them probably pretend they’re from Argentina. It’s a poor, underdeveloped country surrounded by bigger, way more developed countries. Still, at least it’s cheap.  Costa Rica Costa Rica has been popular with expats for over 30 years due to its easy-going lifestyle and gorgeous ocean-side landscapes. Actually, water lovers of all kinds will thrive in Costa Rica, as it boasts the second largest number of rivers and water bodies anywhere in the world. As you can imagine, a wide range of native fauna comes along with that, including over 300 species of a hummingbird!  Costa Rica is a wonderful place for retirees, offering a visa program that welcomes older folks with at least $1,000/month in income. For the working set, you will need a job to settle there. Luckily, Costa Rica has a lot of job opportunities, especially around tourism and teaching English.    Canada Like the hippy younger sibling to America’s hard-working grownup, Canada always takes a contrary liberal stance to the USA. That includes on immigration. Canada is casting its arms to open wide to the surrounding world. Luckily, that includes to you, provided you can prove you’re worth having. Canada’s immigration rules depends entirely on how skilled you are.  For those with the skills or education level that Canada needs, there’s an express entry program that’s so swift, it probably amounts to kidnapping. You fill in an online form, which assigns you points for stuff like education level, industries worked in, and whether you are able to speak French. If you hit a high score on these, plus other stuff like whether you studied in Canada or have Canadian relatives, you’re probably in. All you gotta do next is pony up about $500 CAD ($390 in real dollars).  Cambodia Though steeped in a bloody history, Cambodia is now one of the fastest-growing economies in Asia. It is a good choice for people who crave a change from their first-world ideals, as the customs will be very new to most.  For example, people in Cambodia don’t celebrate their birthdays, and lots of adults don’t even know how old they are. Fast food is not very popular, and the preferred method of travel is the moped.  To live in Cambodia, you can get a long-term business visa without needing to be sponsored by a local company. This visa can be renewed indefinitely but doesn’t grant the right to work for a Cambodian company. You will need to apply for a work permit in order to get a job there, but you may find that employers are lax about enforcing that requirement.    Belize An English-speaking nation in Central America, complete with ultra-low cost of living and the sort of beaches. Wedged awkwardly between Mexico and Guatemala, this paradise is barely larger than Wales and comes with a very small population.  You can apply for permanent residency in Belize after only a year there. To stay there for a year, all you have to do is arrive on a 30-day tourist visa, and keep renewing it every 30 days. When you hit the 50-week mark, pay $1,000 and, after jumping through some bureaucratic hoops, you should be in. Just be careful of the requirement some departments have that you leave the country for two weeks every 6 months. Doing so will reset your year-long countdown.    Nicaragua It might be a shock for those who remember 1980s Nicaragua as a place of leftist coups, civil wars, and rightwing Contras, but Nicaragua is gorgeous.  Provided you can ignore the politics, Nicaragua is the place you always wanted to go home to. Nicaragua runs a retirement program, just like Ecuador. And, just like Ecuador, they take their own entry requirements with a pinch of salt. Provided you can prove an income of $600 a month, you neither have to be old nor, technically, retired.   While most countries don’t let those on retirement visas to work, Nicaragua’s government defines work so loosely you kinda wonder why they bother at all. If you open a restaurant or a small hotel, they don’t define it as work. If you get an income working digitally for a non-Nicaraguan company, they don’t define it as work.    Panama Panama, is technically an independent part of Central America, but in reality looking and feeling like a part of Florida that broke off and floated south, Panama is moving abroad for those who don’t want the hassle and inconvenience that moving abroad usually entails. It’s safe, well developed, a lot of people speak English, and it uses the US dollar. Practically anyone can move there with effectively zero effort.  Most Americans that head to Panama do so on the retiree visa, which gives holders massive discounts on a ton of stuff, while only requiring a monthly income of $1,000. But the residency visa for younger workers is almost equally good. Basically, all you gotta do is deposit $5,000 in a Panamanian bank. Then, if you come from one of 47 ‘friendly countries’ (yeah, that includes USA, Canada, UK, New Zealand, Austria, and the EU), you can get the Friendly Nations Visa. All you need is to find a job or open a business in Panama and you’ve got long-term residency. Just beware that a load of people who get this visa is using it as a massive tax dodge.    Mexico Nothing could be easier than getting permanent leave to remain in Mexico. No, really. Just rock up to the airport/border, and ask to buy an FMM visa. Provided you don’t intend to do any work, the FMM visa allows you to remain in Mexico for 6 months. At that point, you can renew it for another 6 months. Then renew it again. And again. And again, and so on until you finally drop dead. How much does this marvelous, life-changing visa cost? The princely sum of $21.  That’s a layout of $42 a year to legally kick back in a country of pristine beaches, world-class cities, gorgeous colonial towns, and mountain scenery like something out of a dream. Sure, you’re probably gonna need an income to go along with that, but fear not! There are roughly a bazillion Mexican temporary residency visas you can cheaply upgrade to, including some designed for artists, sports players, scientists, and retirees.  All of which just leaves one thing to discuss: the drugs. Yeah, Mexico is in quite a grim place at the moment, with the Drug War having killed tens of thousands in the last decade. Whether you think the risk is worth it is up to you; not everywhere is affected, and some towns are essentially drug-violence free. Just maybe make sure not to do any drugs while you’re there, huh?   Seychelles  Seychelles is a group of 115 gorgeous islands in the western Indian Ocean. Almost half of the available landmass in the country is protected in the form of national parks and reserves, but that still leaves plenty of room for expats craving the beach life and lots of cultural diversity.  All you will need upon arrival in Seychelles is a passport. There are no visa requirements for moving there. If after five years of residence you want to make it official, you will be eligible to apply for citizenship – as long as you haven’t gotten into any legal trouble during that time. Cashed up expats can cut their wait time for citizenship to one year if they invest at least $1 million USD.    Sweden  If you are looking for a high quality of life and progressive political culture, Sweden is a great choice It has been called one of the best countries to be a woman and has the most progressive views regarding gender equality. It also offers generous immigration policies, with a refugee and immigrant population of about 15%.   Sweden is not the easiest country on our list to simply drop into for a long-term stay, because you will need a job offer in order to get a work visa.  However, the immigration process is well automated online, and most people can spend a few months in the country visa-free in order to network.          Svalbard (Norway) The archipelago of Svalbard (pop: 2,642) is indeed part of Norway, but in the same way that Puerto Rico is part of the US or Greenland is part of Denmark. A whole lot of important things have been devolved to the Svalbard administration in Longyearbyen, from gun control to environmental issues, to emergency services, and the issuing of marriage certificates. One of the things that have been devolved is immigration, and Svalbard works on a very different system to Norway. There is no visa regime on Svalbard at all. Literally, anyone can move there and settle down without the need for a permit.  The only thing you need to prove is that you have sufficient funds to support yourself after moving there. This is important because Svalbard is cold. Closer to the North Pole than it is to mainland Norway (itself a very cold country), Svalbard is both freezing and utterly remote. It’s over a thousand miles to the mainland, winters take place in permanent darkness, and hungry polar bears prowl the streets. To cut down on polar bear attacks, unemployment and homelessness are literally illegal, and retirees are deported if they’re considered a drain on society. But hey, at least it’s not your home country, right?   Filed under the category of Moving abroad, job abroad, Canada migration, migration, Filipinos,residency
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Moving abroad permanently may not be the easiest thing in the world, it’s also not as hard as many people would think. In some countries, acquiring residency is so easy. Filipinos, in general, seems to have a strong inclination in finding the right country for migration, may it be for finding a better job abroad or to find a country where they would choose to spend the rest of their lives.  Do you know that there are countries where migration is extremely easy?        Ads     Sponsored Links    Ecuador A land of boiling volcanoes, soaring mountain peaks, and old pastel-colored colonial towns, Ecuador is exactly the sort of over-romanticized stereotype of Latin America you’ve always secretly held in your head. It’s got beaches. Islands. Mayan ruins. An adorably underperforming soccer team. It’s got a remarkably low cost of living, and the US dollar as a currency.  This little slice of the south of the border paradise could be your new home for as little as $800 per month. That’s not costs you gotta pay out. That’s all the income you have to prove you have in order to move to Ecuador.  This is, however, is a requirement for Ecuador’s pensioner visa, not for a general one. Ecuador has no minimum age requirements on pensioner visas, and those claiming they don’t need to even prove they have a pension. You’ve just gotta show that $800 will be landing in your bank account every single month for perpetuity and you’re in. This kinda begs the questions as to why they call it a ‘pensioner visa’, but who are we to argue? The low requirement means people with trust funds, compensation pay outs, and royalties are all able to net an easy visa (probably, don’t quote us on that last one).    Austria  Migrating in Austria is not recommended for those who like their homes nice and cheap. The former seat of Habsburg imperial power, Austria is a tiny country that operates a whole lot like a hipster crafts store: small, fascinating to look at, and so expensive.  Yet Austria does have one thing a hipster store doesn’t have. According to The Telegraph, Austria offers over 10 different types of residence permits. The best part? Absolutely none of them require any form of inward investment.  The bad news is that you need to apply for your residence card abroad (i.e. not in Austria). The good news is this doesn’t apply to EU citizens or Americans. If you’re an American, you can just get a D-Visa, giving you up to 6 months’ leave to stay in the country, then go to Austria, secure a job/wife, and then apply for a proper residence visa. Just remember to smile smugly at all those struggling Canadians and Australians as you waltz your way to the front of the immigration line.    Belgium Germany’s go-to country to invade after Poland, tiny Belgium is one of northern Europe’s tiniest states. Slightly smaller than Maryland, it boasts a whole lotta flat and whole lotta roads. On the other hand, it also has some of the most attractive small towns on the continent. It’s also fairly easy to get a long-term residency. The one thing you have to do? Get a job.  In Belgium, not only will they let you apply for work as an outsider, they’ll then offer you a residency permit after just two weeks of employment. This isn’t a permanent residency permit but it’s certainly a step in the right direction. All you gotta do next is hold onto your job for long enough (it varies by region), and you’ll be laughing all the way to the Belgian citizenship test. The only downside is you need to actually be employable for this plan to work.    Paraguay Nothing could be simpler than getting residency in Paraguay. Probably thanks to its terminal obscurity, the government seems desperate to get as many people into the landlocked South American nation as possible. As a result, there’s only one hard and fast requirement. You need to deposit money in a Paraguayan bank. A small amount won’t do, but you don’t have to go too big. Around 35 times the monthly minimum wage is the accepted sum (between $4,500-$5,500 USD). Of the 6 million or so people who live there, at least half of them probably pretend they’re from Argentina. It’s a poor, underdeveloped country surrounded by bigger, way more developed countries. Still, at least it’s cheap.  Costa Rica Costa Rica has been popular with expats for over 30 years due to its easy-going lifestyle and gorgeous ocean-side landscapes. Actually, water lovers of all kinds will thrive in Costa Rica, as it boasts the second largest number of rivers and water bodies anywhere in the world. As you can imagine, a wide range of native fauna comes along with that, including over 300 species of a hummingbird!  Costa Rica is a wonderful place for retirees, offering a visa program that welcomes older folks with at least $1,000/month in income. For the working set, you will need a job to settle there. Luckily, Costa Rica has a lot of job opportunities, especially around tourism and teaching English.    Canada Like the hippy younger sibling to America’s hard-working grownup, Canada always takes a contrary liberal stance to the USA. That includes on immigration. Canada is casting its arms to open wide to the surrounding world. Luckily, that includes to you, provided you can prove you’re worth having. Canada’s immigration rules depends entirely on how skilled you are.  For those with the skills or education level that Canada needs, there’s an express entry program that’s so swift, it probably amounts to kidnapping. You fill in an online form, which assigns you points for stuff like education level, industries worked in, and whether you are able to speak French. If you hit a high score on these, plus other stuff like whether you studied in Canada or have Canadian relatives, you’re probably in. All you gotta do next is pony up about $500 CAD ($390 in real dollars).  Cambodia Though steeped in a bloody history, Cambodia is now one of the fastest-growing economies in Asia. It is a good choice for people who crave a change from their first-world ideals, as the customs will be very new to most.  For example, people in Cambodia don’t celebrate their birthdays, and lots of adults don’t even know how old they are. Fast food is not very popular, and the preferred method of travel is the moped.  To live in Cambodia, you can get a long-term business visa without needing to be sponsored by a local company. This visa can be renewed indefinitely but doesn’t grant the right to work for a Cambodian company. You will need to apply for a work permit in order to get a job there, but you may find that employers are lax about enforcing that requirement.    Belize An English-speaking nation in Central America, complete with ultra-low cost of living and the sort of beaches. Wedged awkwardly between Mexico and Guatemala, this paradise is barely larger than Wales and comes with a very small population.  You can apply for permanent residency in Belize after only a year there. To stay there for a year, all you have to do is arrive on a 30-day tourist visa, and keep renewing it every 30 days. When you hit the 50-week mark, pay $1,000 and, after jumping through some bureaucratic hoops, you should be in. Just be careful of the requirement some departments have that you leave the country for two weeks every 6 months. Doing so will reset your year-long countdown.    Nicaragua It might be a shock for those who remember 1980s Nicaragua as a place of leftist coups, civil wars, and rightwing Contras, but Nicaragua is gorgeous.  Provided you can ignore the politics, Nicaragua is the place you always wanted to go home to. Nicaragua runs a retirement program, just like Ecuador. And, just like Ecuador, they take their own entry requirements with a pinch of salt. Provided you can prove an income of $600 a month, you neither have to be old nor, technically, retired.   While most countries don’t let those on retirement visas to work, Nicaragua’s government defines work so loosely you kinda wonder why they bother at all. If you open a restaurant or a small hotel, they don’t define it as work. If you get an income working digitally for a non-Nicaraguan company, they don’t define it as work.    Panama Panama, is technically an independent part of Central America, but in reality looking and feeling like a part of Florida that broke off and floated south, Panama is moving abroad for those who don’t want the hassle and inconvenience that moving abroad usually entails. It’s safe, well developed, a lot of people speak English, and it uses the US dollar. Practically anyone can move there with effectively zero effort.  Most Americans that head to Panama do so on the retiree visa, which gives holders massive discounts on a ton of stuff, while only requiring a monthly income of $1,000. But the residency visa for younger workers is almost equally good. Basically, all you gotta do is deposit $5,000 in a Panamanian bank. Then, if you come from one of 47 ‘friendly countries’ (yeah, that includes USA, Canada, UK, New Zealand, Austria, and the EU), you can get the Friendly Nations Visa. All you need is to find a job or open a business in Panama and you’ve got long-term residency. Just beware that a load of people who get this visa is using it as a massive tax dodge.    Mexico Nothing could be easier than getting permanent leave to remain in Mexico. No, really. Just rock up to the airport/border, and ask to buy an FMM visa. Provided you don’t intend to do any work, the FMM visa allows you to remain in Mexico for 6 months. At that point, you can renew it for another 6 months. Then renew it again. And again. And again, and so on until you finally drop dead. How much does this marvelous, life-changing visa cost? The princely sum of $21.  That’s a layout of $42 a year to legally kick back in a country of pristine beaches, world-class cities, gorgeous colonial towns, and mountain scenery like something out of a dream. Sure, you’re probably gonna need an income to go along with that, but fear not! There are roughly a bazillion Mexican temporary residency visas you can cheaply upgrade to, including some designed for artists, sports players, scientists, and retirees.  All of which just leaves one thing to discuss: the drugs. Yeah, Mexico is in quite a grim place at the moment, with the Drug War having killed tens of thousands in the last decade. Whether you think the risk is worth it is up to you; not everywhere is affected, and some towns are essentially drug-violence free. Just maybe make sure not to do any drugs while you’re there, huh?   Seychelles  Seychelles is a group of 115 gorgeous islands in the western Indian Ocean. Almost half of the available landmass in the country is protected in the form of national parks and reserves, but that still leaves plenty of room for expats craving the beach life and lots of cultural diversity.  All you will need upon arrival in Seychelles is a passport. There are no visa requirements for moving there. If after five years of residence you want to make it official, you will be eligible to apply for citizenship – as long as you haven’t gotten into any legal trouble during that time. Cashed up expats can cut their wait time for citizenship to one year if they invest at least $1 million USD.    Sweden  If you are looking for a high quality of life and progressive political culture, Sweden is a great choice It has been called one of the best countries to be a woman and has the most progressive views regarding gender equality. It also offers generous immigration policies, with a refugee and immigrant population of about 15%.   Sweden is not the easiest country on our list to simply drop into for a long-term stay, because you will need a job offer in order to get a work visa.  However, the immigration process is well automated online, and most people can spend a few months in the country visa-free in order to network.          Svalbard (Norway) The archipelago of Svalbard (pop: 2,642) is indeed part of Norway, but in the same way that Puerto Rico is part of the US or Greenland is part of Denmark. A whole lot of important things have been devolved to the Svalbard administration in Longyearbyen, from gun control to environmental issues, to emergency services, and the issuing of marriage certificates. One of the things that have been devolved is immigration, and Svalbard works on a very different system to Norway. There is no visa regime on Svalbard at all. Literally, anyone can move there and settle down without the need for a permit.  The only thing you need to prove is that you have sufficient funds to support yourself after moving there. This is important because Svalbard is cold. Closer to the North Pole than it is to mainland Norway (itself a very cold country), Svalbard is both freezing and utterly remote. It’s over a thousand miles to the mainland, winters take place in permanent darkness, and hungry polar bears prowl the streets. To cut down on polar bear attacks, unemployment and homelessness are literally illegal, and retirees are deported if they’re considered a drain on society. But hey, at least it’s not your home country, right?   Filed under the category of Moving abroad, job abroad, Canada migration, migration, Filipinos,residency
Ecuador
A land of boiling volcanoes, soaring mountain peaks, and old pastel-colored colonial towns, Ecuador is exactly the sort of over-romanticized stereotype of Latin America you’ve always secretly held in your head. It’s got beaches. Islands. Mayan ruins. An adorably underperforming soccer team. It’s got a remarkably low cost of living, and the US dollar as a currency.
 This little slice of the south of the border paradise could be your new home for as little as $800 per month. That’s not costs you gotta pay out. That’s all the income you have to prove you have in order to move to Ecuador.

This is, however, is a requirement for Ecuador’s pensioner visa, not for a general one. Ecuador has no minimum age requirements on pensioner visas, and those claiming they don’t need to even prove they have a pension. You’ve just gotta show that $800 will be landing in your bank account every single month for perpetuity and you’re in. This kinda begs the questions as to why they call it a ‘pensioner visa’, but who are we to argue? The low requirement means people with trust funds, compensation pay outs, and royalties are all able to net an easy visa (probably, don’t quote us on that last one).
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Moving abroad permanently may not be the easiest thing in the world, it’s also not as hard as many people would think. In some countries, acquiring residency is so easy. Filipinos, in general, seems to have a strong inclination in finding the right country for migration, may it be for finding a better job abroad or to find a country where they would choose to spend the rest of their lives.  Do you know that there are countries where migration is extremely easy?        Ads     Sponsored Links    Ecuador A land of boiling volcanoes, soaring mountain peaks, and old pastel-colored colonial towns, Ecuador is exactly the sort of over-romanticized stereotype of Latin America you’ve always secretly held in your head. It’s got beaches. Islands. Mayan ruins. An adorably underperforming soccer team. It’s got a remarkably low cost of living, and the US dollar as a currency.  This little slice of the south of the border paradise could be your new home for as little as $800 per month. That’s not costs you gotta pay out. That’s all the income you have to prove you have in order to move to Ecuador.  This is, however, is a requirement for Ecuador’s pensioner visa, not for a general one. Ecuador has no minimum age requirements on pensioner visas, and those claiming they don’t need to even prove they have a pension. You’ve just gotta show that $800 will be landing in your bank account every single month for perpetuity and you’re in. This kinda begs the questions as to why they call it a ‘pensioner visa’, but who are we to argue? The low requirement means people with trust funds, compensation pay outs, and royalties are all able to net an easy visa (probably, don’t quote us on that last one).    Austria  Migrating in Austria is not recommended for those who like their homes nice and cheap. The former seat of Habsburg imperial power, Austria is a tiny country that operates a whole lot like a hipster crafts store: small, fascinating to look at, and so expensive.  Yet Austria does have one thing a hipster store doesn’t have. According to The Telegraph, Austria offers over 10 different types of residence permits. The best part? Absolutely none of them require any form of inward investment.  The bad news is that you need to apply for your residence card abroad (i.e. not in Austria). The good news is this doesn’t apply to EU citizens or Americans. If you’re an American, you can just get a D-Visa, giving you up to 6 months’ leave to stay in the country, then go to Austria, secure a job/wife, and then apply for a proper residence visa. Just remember to smile smugly at all those struggling Canadians and Australians as you waltz your way to the front of the immigration line.    Belgium Germany’s go-to country to invade after Poland, tiny Belgium is one of northern Europe’s tiniest states. Slightly smaller than Maryland, it boasts a whole lotta flat and whole lotta roads. On the other hand, it also has some of the most attractive small towns on the continent. It’s also fairly easy to get a long-term residency. The one thing you have to do? Get a job.  In Belgium, not only will they let you apply for work as an outsider, they’ll then offer you a residency permit after just two weeks of employment. This isn’t a permanent residency permit but it’s certainly a step in the right direction. All you gotta do next is hold onto your job for long enough (it varies by region), and you’ll be laughing all the way to the Belgian citizenship test. The only downside is you need to actually be employable for this plan to work.    Paraguay Nothing could be simpler than getting residency in Paraguay. Probably thanks to its terminal obscurity, the government seems desperate to get as many people into the landlocked South American nation as possible. As a result, there’s only one hard and fast requirement. You need to deposit money in a Paraguayan bank. A small amount won’t do, but you don’t have to go too big. Around 35 times the monthly minimum wage is the accepted sum (between $4,500-$5,500 USD). Of the 6 million or so people who live there, at least half of them probably pretend they’re from Argentina. It’s a poor, underdeveloped country surrounded by bigger, way more developed countries. Still, at least it’s cheap.  Costa Rica Costa Rica has been popular with expats for over 30 years due to its easy-going lifestyle and gorgeous ocean-side landscapes. Actually, water lovers of all kinds will thrive in Costa Rica, as it boasts the second largest number of rivers and water bodies anywhere in the world. As you can imagine, a wide range of native fauna comes along with that, including over 300 species of a hummingbird!  Costa Rica is a wonderful place for retirees, offering a visa program that welcomes older folks with at least $1,000/month in income. For the working set, you will need a job to settle there. Luckily, Costa Rica has a lot of job opportunities, especially around tourism and teaching English.    Canada Like the hippy younger sibling to America’s hard-working grownup, Canada always takes a contrary liberal stance to the USA. That includes on immigration. Canada is casting its arms to open wide to the surrounding world. Luckily, that includes to you, provided you can prove you’re worth having. Canada’s immigration rules depends entirely on how skilled you are.  For those with the skills or education level that Canada needs, there’s an express entry program that’s so swift, it probably amounts to kidnapping. You fill in an online form, which assigns you points for stuff like education level, industries worked in, and whether you are able to speak French. If you hit a high score on these, plus other stuff like whether you studied in Canada or have Canadian relatives, you’re probably in. All you gotta do next is pony up about $500 CAD ($390 in real dollars).  Cambodia Though steeped in a bloody history, Cambodia is now one of the fastest-growing economies in Asia. It is a good choice for people who crave a change from their first-world ideals, as the customs will be very new to most.  For example, people in Cambodia don’t celebrate their birthdays, and lots of adults don’t even know how old they are. Fast food is not very popular, and the preferred method of travel is the moped.  To live in Cambodia, you can get a long-term business visa without needing to be sponsored by a local company. This visa can be renewed indefinitely but doesn’t grant the right to work for a Cambodian company. You will need to apply for a work permit in order to get a job there, but you may find that employers are lax about enforcing that requirement.    Belize An English-speaking nation in Central America, complete with ultra-low cost of living and the sort of beaches. Wedged awkwardly between Mexico and Guatemala, this paradise is barely larger than Wales and comes with a very small population.  You can apply for permanent residency in Belize after only a year there. To stay there for a year, all you have to do is arrive on a 30-day tourist visa, and keep renewing it every 30 days. When you hit the 50-week mark, pay $1,000 and, after jumping through some bureaucratic hoops, you should be in. Just be careful of the requirement some departments have that you leave the country for two weeks every 6 months. Doing so will reset your year-long countdown.    Nicaragua It might be a shock for those who remember 1980s Nicaragua as a place of leftist coups, civil wars, and rightwing Contras, but Nicaragua is gorgeous.  Provided you can ignore the politics, Nicaragua is the place you always wanted to go home to. Nicaragua runs a retirement program, just like Ecuador. And, just like Ecuador, they take their own entry requirements with a pinch of salt. Provided you can prove an income of $600 a month, you neither have to be old nor, technically, retired.   While most countries don’t let those on retirement visas to work, Nicaragua’s government defines work so loosely you kinda wonder why they bother at all. If you open a restaurant or a small hotel, they don’t define it as work. If you get an income working digitally for a non-Nicaraguan company, they don’t define it as work.    Panama Panama, is technically an independent part of Central America, but in reality looking and feeling like a part of Florida that broke off and floated south, Panama is moving abroad for those who don’t want the hassle and inconvenience that moving abroad usually entails. It’s safe, well developed, a lot of people speak English, and it uses the US dollar. Practically anyone can move there with effectively zero effort.  Most Americans that head to Panama do so on the retiree visa, which gives holders massive discounts on a ton of stuff, while only requiring a monthly income of $1,000. But the residency visa for younger workers is almost equally good. Basically, all you gotta do is deposit $5,000 in a Panamanian bank. Then, if you come from one of 47 ‘friendly countries’ (yeah, that includes USA, Canada, UK, New Zealand, Austria, and the EU), you can get the Friendly Nations Visa. All you need is to find a job or open a business in Panama and you’ve got long-term residency. Just beware that a load of people who get this visa is using it as a massive tax dodge.    Mexico Nothing could be easier than getting permanent leave to remain in Mexico. No, really. Just rock up to the airport/border, and ask to buy an FMM visa. Provided you don’t intend to do any work, the FMM visa allows you to remain in Mexico for 6 months. At that point, you can renew it for another 6 months. Then renew it again. And again. And again, and so on until you finally drop dead. How much does this marvelous, life-changing visa cost? The princely sum of $21.  That’s a layout of $42 a year to legally kick back in a country of pristine beaches, world-class cities, gorgeous colonial towns, and mountain scenery like something out of a dream. Sure, you’re probably gonna need an income to go along with that, but fear not! There are roughly a bazillion Mexican temporary residency visas you can cheaply upgrade to, including some designed for artists, sports players, scientists, and retirees.  All of which just leaves one thing to discuss: the drugs. Yeah, Mexico is in quite a grim place at the moment, with the Drug War having killed tens of thousands in the last decade. Whether you think the risk is worth it is up to you; not everywhere is affected, and some towns are essentially drug-violence free. Just maybe make sure not to do any drugs while you’re there, huh?   Seychelles  Seychelles is a group of 115 gorgeous islands in the western Indian Ocean. Almost half of the available landmass in the country is protected in the form of national parks and reserves, but that still leaves plenty of room for expats craving the beach life and lots of cultural diversity.  All you will need upon arrival in Seychelles is a passport. There are no visa requirements for moving there. If after five years of residence you want to make it official, you will be eligible to apply for citizenship – as long as you haven’t gotten into any legal trouble during that time. Cashed up expats can cut their wait time for citizenship to one year if they invest at least $1 million USD.    Sweden  If you are looking for a high quality of life and progressive political culture, Sweden is a great choice It has been called one of the best countries to be a woman and has the most progressive views regarding gender equality. It also offers generous immigration policies, with a refugee and immigrant population of about 15%.   Sweden is not the easiest country on our list to simply drop into for a long-term stay, because you will need a job offer in order to get a work visa.  However, the immigration process is well automated online, and most people can spend a few months in the country visa-free in order to network.          Svalbard (Norway) The archipelago of Svalbard (pop: 2,642) is indeed part of Norway, but in the same way that Puerto Rico is part of the US or Greenland is part of Denmark. A whole lot of important things have been devolved to the Svalbard administration in Longyearbyen, from gun control to environmental issues, to emergency services, and the issuing of marriage certificates. One of the things that have been devolved is immigration, and Svalbard works on a very different system to Norway. There is no visa regime on Svalbard at all. Literally, anyone can move there and settle down without the need for a permit.  The only thing you need to prove is that you have sufficient funds to support yourself after moving there. This is important because Svalbard is cold. Closer to the North Pole than it is to mainland Norway (itself a very cold country), Svalbard is both freezing and utterly remote. It’s over a thousand miles to the mainland, winters take place in permanent darkness, and hungry polar bears prowl the streets. To cut down on polar bear attacks, unemployment and homelessness are literally illegal, and retirees are deported if they’re considered a drain on society. But hey, at least it’s not your home country, right?   Filed under the category of Moving abroad, job abroad, Canada migration, migration, Filipinos,residency
Austria
 Migrating in Austria is not recommended for those who like their homes nice and cheap. The former seat of Habsburg imperial power, Austria is a tiny country that operates a whole lot like a hipster crafts store: small, fascinating to look at, and so expensive.

Yet Austria does have one thing a hipster store doesn’t have. According to The Telegraph, Austria offers over 10 different types of residence permits. The best part? Absolutely none of them require any form of inward investment.

The bad news is that you need to apply for your residence card abroad (i.e. not in Austria). The good news is this doesn’t apply to EU citizens or Americans. If you’re an American, you can just get a D-Visa, giving you up to 6 months’ leave to stay in the country, then go to Austria, secure a job/wife, and then apply for a proper residence visa. Just remember to smile smugly at all those struggling Canadians and Australians as you waltz your way to the front of the immigration line.
Moving abroad permanently may not be the easiest thing in the world, it’s also not as hard as many people would think. In some countries, acquiring residency is so easy. Filipinos, in general, seems to have a strong inclination in finding the right country for migration, may it be for finding a better job abroad or to find a country where they would choose to spend the rest of their lives.  Do you know that there are countries where migration is extremely easy?        Ads     Sponsored Links    Ecuador A land of boiling volcanoes, soaring mountain peaks, and old pastel-colored colonial towns, Ecuador is exactly the sort of over-romanticized stereotype of Latin America you’ve always secretly held in your head. It’s got beaches. Islands. Mayan ruins. An adorably underperforming soccer team. It’s got a remarkably low cost of living, and the US dollar as a currency.  This little slice of the south of the border paradise could be your new home for as little as $800 per month. That’s not costs you gotta pay out. That’s all the income you have to prove you have in order to move to Ecuador.  This is, however, is a requirement for Ecuador’s pensioner visa, not for a general one. Ecuador has no minimum age requirements on pensioner visas, and those claiming they don’t need to even prove they have a pension. You’ve just gotta show that $800 will be landing in your bank account every single month for perpetuity and you’re in. This kinda begs the questions as to why they call it a ‘pensioner visa’, but who are we to argue? The low requirement means people with trust funds, compensation pay outs, and royalties are all able to net an easy visa (probably, don’t quote us on that last one).    Austria  Migrating in Austria is not recommended for those who like their homes nice and cheap. The former seat of Habsburg imperial power, Austria is a tiny country that operates a whole lot like a hipster crafts store: small, fascinating to look at, and so expensive.  Yet Austria does have one thing a hipster store doesn’t have. According to The Telegraph, Austria offers over 10 different types of residence permits. The best part? Absolutely none of them require any form of inward investment.  The bad news is that you need to apply for your residence card abroad (i.e. not in Austria). The good news is this doesn’t apply to EU citizens or Americans. If you’re an American, you can just get a D-Visa, giving you up to 6 months’ leave to stay in the country, then go to Austria, secure a job/wife, and then apply for a proper residence visa. Just remember to smile smugly at all those struggling Canadians and Australians as you waltz your way to the front of the immigration line.    Belgium Germany’s go-to country to invade after Poland, tiny Belgium is one of northern Europe’s tiniest states. Slightly smaller than Maryland, it boasts a whole lotta flat and whole lotta roads. On the other hand, it also has some of the most attractive small towns on the continent. It’s also fairly easy to get a long-term residency. The one thing you have to do? Get a job.  In Belgium, not only will they let you apply for work as an outsider, they’ll then offer you a residency permit after just two weeks of employment. This isn’t a permanent residency permit but it’s certainly a step in the right direction. All you gotta do next is hold onto your job for long enough (it varies by region), and you’ll be laughing all the way to the Belgian citizenship test. The only downside is you need to actually be employable for this plan to work.    Paraguay Nothing could be simpler than getting residency in Paraguay. Probably thanks to its terminal obscurity, the government seems desperate to get as many people into the landlocked South American nation as possible. As a result, there’s only one hard and fast requirement. You need to deposit money in a Paraguayan bank. A small amount won’t do, but you don’t have to go too big. Around 35 times the monthly minimum wage is the accepted sum (between $4,500-$5,500 USD). Of the 6 million or so people who live there, at least half of them probably pretend they’re from Argentina. It’s a poor, underdeveloped country surrounded by bigger, way more developed countries. Still, at least it’s cheap.  Costa Rica Costa Rica has been popular with expats for over 30 years due to its easy-going lifestyle and gorgeous ocean-side landscapes. Actually, water lovers of all kinds will thrive in Costa Rica, as it boasts the second largest number of rivers and water bodies anywhere in the world. As you can imagine, a wide range of native fauna comes along with that, including over 300 species of a hummingbird!  Costa Rica is a wonderful place for retirees, offering a visa program that welcomes older folks with at least $1,000/month in income. For the working set, you will need a job to settle there. Luckily, Costa Rica has a lot of job opportunities, especially around tourism and teaching English.    Canada Like the hippy younger sibling to America’s hard-working grownup, Canada always takes a contrary liberal stance to the USA. That includes on immigration. Canada is casting its arms to open wide to the surrounding world. Luckily, that includes to you, provided you can prove you’re worth having. Canada’s immigration rules depends entirely on how skilled you are.  For those with the skills or education level that Canada needs, there’s an express entry program that’s so swift, it probably amounts to kidnapping. You fill in an online form, which assigns you points for stuff like education level, industries worked in, and whether you are able to speak French. If you hit a high score on these, plus other stuff like whether you studied in Canada or have Canadian relatives, you’re probably in. All you gotta do next is pony up about $500 CAD ($390 in real dollars).  Cambodia Though steeped in a bloody history, Cambodia is now one of the fastest-growing economies in Asia. It is a good choice for people who crave a change from their first-world ideals, as the customs will be very new to most.  For example, people in Cambodia don’t celebrate their birthdays, and lots of adults don’t even know how old they are. Fast food is not very popular, and the preferred method of travel is the moped.  To live in Cambodia, you can get a long-term business visa without needing to be sponsored by a local company. This visa can be renewed indefinitely but doesn’t grant the right to work for a Cambodian company. You will need to apply for a work permit in order to get a job there, but you may find that employers are lax about enforcing that requirement.    Belize An English-speaking nation in Central America, complete with ultra-low cost of living and the sort of beaches. Wedged awkwardly between Mexico and Guatemala, this paradise is barely larger than Wales and comes with a very small population.  You can apply for permanent residency in Belize after only a year there. To stay there for a year, all you have to do is arrive on a 30-day tourist visa, and keep renewing it every 30 days. When you hit the 50-week mark, pay $1,000 and, after jumping through some bureaucratic hoops, you should be in. Just be careful of the requirement some departments have that you leave the country for two weeks every 6 months. Doing so will reset your year-long countdown.    Nicaragua It might be a shock for those who remember 1980s Nicaragua as a place of leftist coups, civil wars, and rightwing Contras, but Nicaragua is gorgeous.  Provided you can ignore the politics, Nicaragua is the place you always wanted to go home to. Nicaragua runs a retirement program, just like Ecuador. And, just like Ecuador, they take their own entry requirements with a pinch of salt. Provided you can prove an income of $600 a month, you neither have to be old nor, technically, retired.   While most countries don’t let those on retirement visas to work, Nicaragua’s government defines work so loosely you kinda wonder why they bother at all. If you open a restaurant or a small hotel, they don’t define it as work. If you get an income working digitally for a non-Nicaraguan company, they don’t define it as work.    Panama Panama, is technically an independent part of Central America, but in reality looking and feeling like a part of Florida that broke off and floated south, Panama is moving abroad for those who don’t want the hassle and inconvenience that moving abroad usually entails. It’s safe, well developed, a lot of people speak English, and it uses the US dollar. Practically anyone can move there with effectively zero effort.  Most Americans that head to Panama do so on the retiree visa, which gives holders massive discounts on a ton of stuff, while only requiring a monthly income of $1,000. But the residency visa for younger workers is almost equally good. Basically, all you gotta do is deposit $5,000 in a Panamanian bank. Then, if you come from one of 47 ‘friendly countries’ (yeah, that includes USA, Canada, UK, New Zealand, Austria, and the EU), you can get the Friendly Nations Visa. All you need is to find a job or open a business in Panama and you’ve got long-term residency. Just beware that a load of people who get this visa is using it as a massive tax dodge.    Mexico Nothing could be easier than getting permanent leave to remain in Mexico. No, really. Just rock up to the airport/border, and ask to buy an FMM visa. Provided you don’t intend to do any work, the FMM visa allows you to remain in Mexico for 6 months. At that point, you can renew it for another 6 months. Then renew it again. And again. And again, and so on until you finally drop dead. How much does this marvelous, life-changing visa cost? The princely sum of $21.  That’s a layout of $42 a year to legally kick back in a country of pristine beaches, world-class cities, gorgeous colonial towns, and mountain scenery like something out of a dream. Sure, you’re probably gonna need an income to go along with that, but fear not! There are roughly a bazillion Mexican temporary residency visas you can cheaply upgrade to, including some designed for artists, sports players, scientists, and retirees.  All of which just leaves one thing to discuss: the drugs. Yeah, Mexico is in quite a grim place at the moment, with the Drug War having killed tens of thousands in the last decade. Whether you think the risk is worth it is up to you; not everywhere is affected, and some towns are essentially drug-violence free. Just maybe make sure not to do any drugs while you’re there, huh?   Seychelles  Seychelles is a group of 115 gorgeous islands in the western Indian Ocean. Almost half of the available landmass in the country is protected in the form of national parks and reserves, but that still leaves plenty of room for expats craving the beach life and lots of cultural diversity.  All you will need upon arrival in Seychelles is a passport. There are no visa requirements for moving there. If after five years of residence you want to make it official, you will be eligible to apply for citizenship – as long as you haven’t gotten into any legal trouble during that time. Cashed up expats can cut their wait time for citizenship to one year if they invest at least $1 million USD.    Sweden  If you are looking for a high quality of life and progressive political culture, Sweden is a great choice It has been called one of the best countries to be a woman and has the most progressive views regarding gender equality. It also offers generous immigration policies, with a refugee and immigrant population of about 15%.   Sweden is not the easiest country on our list to simply drop into for a long-term stay, because you will need a job offer in order to get a work visa.  However, the immigration process is well automated online, and most people can spend a few months in the country visa-free in order to network.          Svalbard (Norway) The archipelago of Svalbard (pop: 2,642) is indeed part of Norway, but in the same way that Puerto Rico is part of the US or Greenland is part of Denmark. A whole lot of important things have been devolved to the Svalbard administration in Longyearbyen, from gun control to environmental issues, to emergency services, and the issuing of marriage certificates. One of the things that have been devolved is immigration, and Svalbard works on a very different system to Norway. There is no visa regime on Svalbard at all. Literally, anyone can move there and settle down without the need for a permit.  The only thing you need to prove is that you have sufficient funds to support yourself after moving there. This is important because Svalbard is cold. Closer to the North Pole than it is to mainland Norway (itself a very cold country), Svalbard is both freezing and utterly remote. It’s over a thousand miles to the mainland, winters take place in permanent darkness, and hungry polar bears prowl the streets. To cut down on polar bear attacks, unemployment and homelessness are literally illegal, and retirees are deported if they’re considered a drain on society. But hey, at least it’s not your home country, right?   Filed under the category of Moving abroad, job abroad, Canada migration, migration, Filipinos,residency
Belgium
Germany’s go-to country to invade after Poland, tiny Belgium is one of northern Europe’s tiniest states. Slightly smaller than Maryland, it boasts a whole lotta flat and whole lotta roads. On the other hand, it also has some of the most attractive small towns on the continent. It’s also fairly easy to get a long-term residency. The one thing you have to do? Get a job.
 In Belgium, not only will they let you apply for work as an outsider, they’ll then offer you a residency permit after just two weeks of employment. This isn’t a permanent residency permit but it’s certainly a step in the right direction. All you gotta do next is hold onto your job for long enough (it varies by region), and you’ll be laughing all the way to the Belgian citizenship test. The only downside is you need to actually be employable for this plan to work.
Moving abroad permanently may not be the easiest thing in the world, it’s also not as hard as many people would think. In some countries, acquiring residency is so easy. Filipinos, in general, seems to have a strong inclination in finding the right country for migration, may it be for finding a better job abroad or to find a country where they would choose to spend the rest of their lives.  Do you know that there are countries where migration is extremely easy?        Ads     Sponsored Links    Ecuador A land of boiling volcanoes, soaring mountain peaks, and old pastel-colored colonial towns, Ecuador is exactly the sort of over-romanticized stereotype of Latin America you’ve always secretly held in your head. It’s got beaches. Islands. Mayan ruins. An adorably underperforming soccer team. It’s got a remarkably low cost of living, and the US dollar as a currency.  This little slice of the south of the border paradise could be your new home for as little as $800 per month. That’s not costs you gotta pay out. That’s all the income you have to prove you have in order to move to Ecuador.  This is, however, is a requirement for Ecuador’s pensioner visa, not for a general one. Ecuador has no minimum age requirements on pensioner visas, and those claiming they don’t need to even prove they have a pension. You’ve just gotta show that $800 will be landing in your bank account every single month for perpetuity and you’re in. This kinda begs the questions as to why they call it a ‘pensioner visa’, but who are we to argue? The low requirement means people with trust funds, compensation pay outs, and royalties are all able to net an easy visa (probably, don’t quote us on that last one).    Austria  Migrating in Austria is not recommended for those who like their homes nice and cheap. The former seat of Habsburg imperial power, Austria is a tiny country that operates a whole lot like a hipster crafts store: small, fascinating to look at, and so expensive.  Yet Austria does have one thing a hipster store doesn’t have. According to The Telegraph, Austria offers over 10 different types of residence permits. The best part? Absolutely none of them require any form of inward investment.  The bad news is that you need to apply for your residence card abroad (i.e. not in Austria). The good news is this doesn’t apply to EU citizens or Americans. If you’re an American, you can just get a D-Visa, giving you up to 6 months’ leave to stay in the country, then go to Austria, secure a job/wife, and then apply for a proper residence visa. Just remember to smile smugly at all those struggling Canadians and Australians as you waltz your way to the front of the immigration line.    Belgium Germany’s go-to country to invade after Poland, tiny Belgium is one of northern Europe’s tiniest states. Slightly smaller than Maryland, it boasts a whole lotta flat and whole lotta roads. On the other hand, it also has some of the most attractive small towns on the continent. It’s also fairly easy to get a long-term residency. The one thing you have to do? Get a job.  In Belgium, not only will they let you apply for work as an outsider, they’ll then offer you a residency permit after just two weeks of employment. This isn’t a permanent residency permit but it’s certainly a step in the right direction. All you gotta do next is hold onto your job for long enough (it varies by region), and you’ll be laughing all the way to the Belgian citizenship test. The only downside is you need to actually be employable for this plan to work.    Paraguay Nothing could be simpler than getting residency in Paraguay. Probably thanks to its terminal obscurity, the government seems desperate to get as many people into the landlocked South American nation as possible. As a result, there’s only one hard and fast requirement. You need to deposit money in a Paraguayan bank. A small amount won’t do, but you don’t have to go too big. Around 35 times the monthly minimum wage is the accepted sum (between $4,500-$5,500 USD). Of the 6 million or so people who live there, at least half of them probably pretend they’re from Argentina. It’s a poor, underdeveloped country surrounded by bigger, way more developed countries. Still, at least it’s cheap.  Costa Rica Costa Rica has been popular with expats for over 30 years due to its easy-going lifestyle and gorgeous ocean-side landscapes. Actually, water lovers of all kinds will thrive in Costa Rica, as it boasts the second largest number of rivers and water bodies anywhere in the world. As you can imagine, a wide range of native fauna comes along with that, including over 300 species of a hummingbird!  Costa Rica is a wonderful place for retirees, offering a visa program that welcomes older folks with at least $1,000/month in income. For the working set, you will need a job to settle there. Luckily, Costa Rica has a lot of job opportunities, especially around tourism and teaching English.    Canada Like the hippy younger sibling to America’s hard-working grownup, Canada always takes a contrary liberal stance to the USA. That includes on immigration. Canada is casting its arms to open wide to the surrounding world. Luckily, that includes to you, provided you can prove you’re worth having. Canada’s immigration rules depends entirely on how skilled you are.  For those with the skills or education level that Canada needs, there’s an express entry program that’s so swift, it probably amounts to kidnapping. You fill in an online form, which assigns you points for stuff like education level, industries worked in, and whether you are able to speak French. If you hit a high score on these, plus other stuff like whether you studied in Canada or have Canadian relatives, you’re probably in. All you gotta do next is pony up about $500 CAD ($390 in real dollars).  Cambodia Though steeped in a bloody history, Cambodia is now one of the fastest-growing economies in Asia. It is a good choice for people who crave a change from their first-world ideals, as the customs will be very new to most.  For example, people in Cambodia don’t celebrate their birthdays, and lots of adults don’t even know how old they are. Fast food is not very popular, and the preferred method of travel is the moped.  To live in Cambodia, you can get a long-term business visa without needing to be sponsored by a local company. This visa can be renewed indefinitely but doesn’t grant the right to work for a Cambodian company. You will need to apply for a work permit in order to get a job there, but you may find that employers are lax about enforcing that requirement.    Belize An English-speaking nation in Central America, complete with ultra-low cost of living and the sort of beaches. Wedged awkwardly between Mexico and Guatemala, this paradise is barely larger than Wales and comes with a very small population.  You can apply for permanent residency in Belize after only a year there. To stay there for a year, all you have to do is arrive on a 30-day tourist visa, and keep renewing it every 30 days. When you hit the 50-week mark, pay $1,000 and, after jumping through some bureaucratic hoops, you should be in. Just be careful of the requirement some departments have that you leave the country for two weeks every 6 months. Doing so will reset your year-long countdown.    Nicaragua It might be a shock for those who remember 1980s Nicaragua as a place of leftist coups, civil wars, and rightwing Contras, but Nicaragua is gorgeous.  Provided you can ignore the politics, Nicaragua is the place you always wanted to go home to. Nicaragua runs a retirement program, just like Ecuador. And, just like Ecuador, they take their own entry requirements with a pinch of salt. Provided you can prove an income of $600 a month, you neither have to be old nor, technically, retired.   While most countries don’t let those on retirement visas to work, Nicaragua’s government defines work so loosely you kinda wonder why they bother at all. If you open a restaurant or a small hotel, they don’t define it as work. If you get an income working digitally for a non-Nicaraguan company, they don’t define it as work.    Panama Panama, is technically an independent part of Central America, but in reality looking and feeling like a part of Florida that broke off and floated south, Panama is moving abroad for those who don’t want the hassle and inconvenience that moving abroad usually entails. It’s safe, well developed, a lot of people speak English, and it uses the US dollar. Practically anyone can move there with effectively zero effort.  Most Americans that head to Panama do so on the retiree visa, which gives holders massive discounts on a ton of stuff, while only requiring a monthly income of $1,000. But the residency visa for younger workers is almost equally good. Basically, all you gotta do is deposit $5,000 in a Panamanian bank. Then, if you come from one of 47 ‘friendly countries’ (yeah, that includes USA, Canada, UK, New Zealand, Austria, and the EU), you can get the Friendly Nations Visa. All you need is to find a job or open a business in Panama and you’ve got long-term residency. Just beware that a load of people who get this visa is using it as a massive tax dodge.    Mexico Nothing could be easier than getting permanent leave to remain in Mexico. No, really. Just rock up to the airport/border, and ask to buy an FMM visa. Provided you don’t intend to do any work, the FMM visa allows you to remain in Mexico for 6 months. At that point, you can renew it for another 6 months. Then renew it again. And again. And again, and so on until you finally drop dead. How much does this marvelous, life-changing visa cost? The princely sum of $21.  That’s a layout of $42 a year to legally kick back in a country of pristine beaches, world-class cities, gorgeous colonial towns, and mountain scenery like something out of a dream. Sure, you’re probably gonna need an income to go along with that, but fear not! There are roughly a bazillion Mexican temporary residency visas you can cheaply upgrade to, including some designed for artists, sports players, scientists, and retirees.  All of which just leaves one thing to discuss: the drugs. Yeah, Mexico is in quite a grim place at the moment, with the Drug War having killed tens of thousands in the last decade. Whether you think the risk is worth it is up to you; not everywhere is affected, and some towns are essentially drug-violence free. Just maybe make sure not to do any drugs while you’re there, huh?   Seychelles  Seychelles is a group of 115 gorgeous islands in the western Indian Ocean. Almost half of the available landmass in the country is protected in the form of national parks and reserves, but that still leaves plenty of room for expats craving the beach life and lots of cultural diversity.  All you will need upon arrival in Seychelles is a passport. There are no visa requirements for moving there. If after five years of residence you want to make it official, you will be eligible to apply for citizenship – as long as you haven’t gotten into any legal trouble during that time. Cashed up expats can cut their wait time for citizenship to one year if they invest at least $1 million USD.    Sweden  If you are looking for a high quality of life and progressive political culture, Sweden is a great choice It has been called one of the best countries to be a woman and has the most progressive views regarding gender equality. It also offers generous immigration policies, with a refugee and immigrant population of about 15%.   Sweden is not the easiest country on our list to simply drop into for a long-term stay, because you will need a job offer in order to get a work visa.  However, the immigration process is well automated online, and most people can spend a few months in the country visa-free in order to network.          Svalbard (Norway) The archipelago of Svalbard (pop: 2,642) is indeed part of Norway, but in the same way that Puerto Rico is part of the US or Greenland is part of Denmark. A whole lot of important things have been devolved to the Svalbard administration in Longyearbyen, from gun control to environmental issues, to emergency services, and the issuing of marriage certificates. One of the things that have been devolved is immigration, and Svalbard works on a very different system to Norway. There is no visa regime on Svalbard at all. Literally, anyone can move there and settle down without the need for a permit.  The only thing you need to prove is that you have sufficient funds to support yourself after moving there. This is important because Svalbard is cold. Closer to the North Pole than it is to mainland Norway (itself a very cold country), Svalbard is both freezing and utterly remote. It’s over a thousand miles to the mainland, winters take place in permanent darkness, and hungry polar bears prowl the streets. To cut down on polar bear attacks, unemployment and homelessness are literally illegal, and retirees are deported if they’re considered a drain on society. But hey, at least it’s not your home country, right?   Filed under the category of Moving abroad, job abroad, Canada migration, migration, Filipinos,residency
Paraguay
Nothing could be simpler than getting residency in Paraguay. Probably thanks to its terminal obscurity, the government seems desperate to get as many people into the landlocked South American nation as possible. As a result, there’s only one hard and fast requirement. You need to deposit money in a Paraguayan bank. A small amount won’t do, but you don’t have to go too big. Around 35 times the monthly minimum wage is the accepted sum (between $4,500-$5,500 USD).
Of the 6 million or so people who live there, at least half of them probably pretend they’re from Argentina. It’s a poor, underdeveloped country surrounded by bigger, way more developed countries. Still, at least it’s cheap.

Costa Rica
Costa Rica has been popular with expats for over 30 years due to its easy-going lifestyle and gorgeous ocean-side landscapes. Actually, water lovers of all kinds will thrive in Costa Rica, as it boasts the second largest number of rivers and water bodies anywhere in the world. As you can imagine, a wide range of native fauna comes along with that, including over 300 species of a hummingbird!

Costa Rica is a wonderful place for retirees, offering a visa program that welcomes older folks with at least $1,000/month in income. For the working set, you will need a job to settle there. Luckily, Costa Rica has a lot of job opportunities, especially around tourism and teaching English.
Moving abroad permanently may not be the easiest thing in the world, it’s also not as hard as many people would think. In some countries, acquiring residency is so easy. Filipinos, in general, seems to have a strong inclination in finding the right country for migration, may it be for finding a better job abroad or to find a country where they would choose to spend the rest of their lives.  Do you know that there are countries where migration is extremely easy?        Ads     Sponsored Links    Ecuador A land of boiling volcanoes, soaring mountain peaks, and old pastel-colored colonial towns, Ecuador is exactly the sort of over-romanticized stereotype of Latin America you’ve always secretly held in your head. It’s got beaches. Islands. Mayan ruins. An adorably underperforming soccer team. It’s got a remarkably low cost of living, and the US dollar as a currency.  This little slice of the south of the border paradise could be your new home for as little as $800 per month. That’s not costs you gotta pay out. That’s all the income you have to prove you have in order to move to Ecuador.  This is, however, is a requirement for Ecuador’s pensioner visa, not for a general one. Ecuador has no minimum age requirements on pensioner visas, and those claiming they don’t need to even prove they have a pension. You’ve just gotta show that $800 will be landing in your bank account every single month for perpetuity and you’re in. This kinda begs the questions as to why they call it a ‘pensioner visa’, but who are we to argue? The low requirement means people with trust funds, compensation pay outs, and royalties are all able to net an easy visa (probably, don’t quote us on that last one).    Austria  Migrating in Austria is not recommended for those who like their homes nice and cheap. The former seat of Habsburg imperial power, Austria is a tiny country that operates a whole lot like a hipster crafts store: small, fascinating to look at, and so expensive.  Yet Austria does have one thing a hipster store doesn’t have. According to The Telegraph, Austria offers over 10 different types of residence permits. The best part? Absolutely none of them require any form of inward investment.  The bad news is that you need to apply for your residence card abroad (i.e. not in Austria). The good news is this doesn’t apply to EU citizens or Americans. If you’re an American, you can just get a D-Visa, giving you up to 6 months’ leave to stay in the country, then go to Austria, secure a job/wife, and then apply for a proper residence visa. Just remember to smile smugly at all those struggling Canadians and Australians as you waltz your way to the front of the immigration line.    Belgium Germany’s go-to country to invade after Poland, tiny Belgium is one of northern Europe’s tiniest states. Slightly smaller than Maryland, it boasts a whole lotta flat and whole lotta roads. On the other hand, it also has some of the most attractive small towns on the continent. It’s also fairly easy to get a long-term residency. The one thing you have to do? Get a job.  In Belgium, not only will they let you apply for work as an outsider, they’ll then offer you a residency permit after just two weeks of employment. This isn’t a permanent residency permit but it’s certainly a step in the right direction. All you gotta do next is hold onto your job for long enough (it varies by region), and you’ll be laughing all the way to the Belgian citizenship test. The only downside is you need to actually be employable for this plan to work.    Paraguay Nothing could be simpler than getting residency in Paraguay. Probably thanks to its terminal obscurity, the government seems desperate to get as many people into the landlocked South American nation as possible. As a result, there’s only one hard and fast requirement. You need to deposit money in a Paraguayan bank. A small amount won’t do, but you don’t have to go too big. Around 35 times the monthly minimum wage is the accepted sum (between $4,500-$5,500 USD). Of the 6 million or so people who live there, at least half of them probably pretend they’re from Argentina. It’s a poor, underdeveloped country surrounded by bigger, way more developed countries. Still, at least it’s cheap.  Costa Rica Costa Rica has been popular with expats for over 30 years due to its easy-going lifestyle and gorgeous ocean-side landscapes. Actually, water lovers of all kinds will thrive in Costa Rica, as it boasts the second largest number of rivers and water bodies anywhere in the world. As you can imagine, a wide range of native fauna comes along with that, including over 300 species of a hummingbird!  Costa Rica is a wonderful place for retirees, offering a visa program that welcomes older folks with at least $1,000/month in income. For the working set, you will need a job to settle there. Luckily, Costa Rica has a lot of job opportunities, especially around tourism and teaching English.    Canada Like the hippy younger sibling to America’s hard-working grownup, Canada always takes a contrary liberal stance to the USA. That includes on immigration. Canada is casting its arms to open wide to the surrounding world. Luckily, that includes to you, provided you can prove you’re worth having. Canada’s immigration rules depends entirely on how skilled you are.  For those with the skills or education level that Canada needs, there’s an express entry program that’s so swift, it probably amounts to kidnapping. You fill in an online form, which assigns you points for stuff like education level, industries worked in, and whether you are able to speak French. If you hit a high score on these, plus other stuff like whether you studied in Canada or have Canadian relatives, you’re probably in. All you gotta do next is pony up about $500 CAD ($390 in real dollars).  Cambodia Though steeped in a bloody history, Cambodia is now one of the fastest-growing economies in Asia. It is a good choice for people who crave a change from their first-world ideals, as the customs will be very new to most.  For example, people in Cambodia don’t celebrate their birthdays, and lots of adults don’t even know how old they are. Fast food is not very popular, and the preferred method of travel is the moped.  To live in Cambodia, you can get a long-term business visa without needing to be sponsored by a local company. This visa can be renewed indefinitely but doesn’t grant the right to work for a Cambodian company. You will need to apply for a work permit in order to get a job there, but you may find that employers are lax about enforcing that requirement.    Belize An English-speaking nation in Central America, complete with ultra-low cost of living and the sort of beaches. Wedged awkwardly between Mexico and Guatemala, this paradise is barely larger than Wales and comes with a very small population.  You can apply for permanent residency in Belize after only a year there. To stay there for a year, all you have to do is arrive on a 30-day tourist visa, and keep renewing it every 30 days. When you hit the 50-week mark, pay $1,000 and, after jumping through some bureaucratic hoops, you should be in. Just be careful of the requirement some departments have that you leave the country for two weeks every 6 months. Doing so will reset your year-long countdown.    Nicaragua It might be a shock for those who remember 1980s Nicaragua as a place of leftist coups, civil wars, and rightwing Contras, but Nicaragua is gorgeous.  Provided you can ignore the politics, Nicaragua is the place you always wanted to go home to. Nicaragua runs a retirement program, just like Ecuador. And, just like Ecuador, they take their own entry requirements with a pinch of salt. Provided you can prove an income of $600 a month, you neither have to be old nor, technically, retired.   While most countries don’t let those on retirement visas to work, Nicaragua’s government defines work so loosely you kinda wonder why they bother at all. If you open a restaurant or a small hotel, they don’t define it as work. If you get an income working digitally for a non-Nicaraguan company, they don’t define it as work.    Panama Panama, is technically an independent part of Central America, but in reality looking and feeling like a part of Florida that broke off and floated south, Panama is moving abroad for those who don’t want the hassle and inconvenience that moving abroad usually entails. It’s safe, well developed, a lot of people speak English, and it uses the US dollar. Practically anyone can move there with effectively zero effort.  Most Americans that head to Panama do so on the retiree visa, which gives holders massive discounts on a ton of stuff, while only requiring a monthly income of $1,000. But the residency visa for younger workers is almost equally good. Basically, all you gotta do is deposit $5,000 in a Panamanian bank. Then, if you come from one of 47 ‘friendly countries’ (yeah, that includes USA, Canada, UK, New Zealand, Austria, and the EU), you can get the Friendly Nations Visa. All you need is to find a job or open a business in Panama and you’ve got long-term residency. Just beware that a load of people who get this visa is using it as a massive tax dodge.    Mexico Nothing could be easier than getting permanent leave to remain in Mexico. No, really. Just rock up to the airport/border, and ask to buy an FMM visa. Provided you don’t intend to do any work, the FMM visa allows you to remain in Mexico for 6 months. At that point, you can renew it for another 6 months. Then renew it again. And again. And again, and so on until you finally drop dead. How much does this marvelous, life-changing visa cost? The princely sum of $21.  That’s a layout of $42 a year to legally kick back in a country of pristine beaches, world-class cities, gorgeous colonial towns, and mountain scenery like something out of a dream. Sure, you’re probably gonna need an income to go along with that, but fear not! There are roughly a bazillion Mexican temporary residency visas you can cheaply upgrade to, including some designed for artists, sports players, scientists, and retirees.  All of which just leaves one thing to discuss: the drugs. Yeah, Mexico is in quite a grim place at the moment, with the Drug War having killed tens of thousands in the last decade. Whether you think the risk is worth it is up to you; not everywhere is affected, and some towns are essentially drug-violence free. Just maybe make sure not to do any drugs while you’re there, huh?   Seychelles  Seychelles is a group of 115 gorgeous islands in the western Indian Ocean. Almost half of the available landmass in the country is protected in the form of national parks and reserves, but that still leaves plenty of room for expats craving the beach life and lots of cultural diversity.  All you will need upon arrival in Seychelles is a passport. There are no visa requirements for moving there. If after five years of residence you want to make it official, you will be eligible to apply for citizenship – as long as you haven’t gotten into any legal trouble during that time. Cashed up expats can cut their wait time for citizenship to one year if they invest at least $1 million USD.    Sweden  If you are looking for a high quality of life and progressive political culture, Sweden is a great choice It has been called one of the best countries to be a woman and has the most progressive views regarding gender equality. It also offers generous immigration policies, with a refugee and immigrant population of about 15%.   Sweden is not the easiest country on our list to simply drop into for a long-term stay, because you will need a job offer in order to get a work visa.  However, the immigration process is well automated online, and most people can spend a few months in the country visa-free in order to network.          Svalbard (Norway) The archipelago of Svalbard (pop: 2,642) is indeed part of Norway, but in the same way that Puerto Rico is part of the US or Greenland is part of Denmark. A whole lot of important things have been devolved to the Svalbard administration in Longyearbyen, from gun control to environmental issues, to emergency services, and the issuing of marriage certificates. One of the things that have been devolved is immigration, and Svalbard works on a very different system to Norway. There is no visa regime on Svalbard at all. Literally, anyone can move there and settle down without the need for a permit.  The only thing you need to prove is that you have sufficient funds to support yourself after moving there. This is important because Svalbard is cold. Closer to the North Pole than it is to mainland Norway (itself a very cold country), Svalbard is both freezing and utterly remote. It’s over a thousand miles to the mainland, winters take place in permanent darkness, and hungry polar bears prowl the streets. To cut down on polar bear attacks, unemployment and homelessness are literally illegal, and retirees are deported if they’re considered a drain on society. But hey, at least it’s not your home country, right?   Filed under the category of Moving abroad, job abroad, Canada migration, migration, Filipinos,residency
Canada
Like the hippy younger sibling to America’s hard-working grownup, Canada always takes a contrary liberal stance to the USA. That includes on immigration. Canada is casting its arms to open wide to the surrounding world. Luckily, that includes to you, provided you can prove you’re worth having. Canada’s immigration rules depend entirely on how skilled you are.

For those with the skills or education level that Canada needs, there’s an express entry program that’s so swift, it probably amounts to kidnapping. You fill in an online form, which assigns you points for stuff like education level, industries worked in, and whether you are able to speak French. If you hit a high score on these, plus other stuff like whether you studied in Canada or have Canadian relatives, you’re probably in. All you gotta do next is pony up about $500 CAD ($390 in real dollars).
Moving abroad permanently may not be the easiest thing in the world, it’s also not as hard as many people would think. In some countries, acquiring residency is so easy. Filipinos, in general, seems to have a strong inclination in finding the right country for migration, may it be for finding a better job abroad or to find a country where they would choose to spend the rest of their lives.  Do you know that there are countries where migration is extremely easy?        Ads     Sponsored Links    Ecuador A land of boiling volcanoes, soaring mountain peaks, and old pastel-colored colonial towns, Ecuador is exactly the sort of over-romanticized stereotype of Latin America you’ve always secretly held in your head. It’s got beaches. Islands. Mayan ruins. An adorably underperforming soccer team. It’s got a remarkably low cost of living, and the US dollar as a currency.  This little slice of the south of the border paradise could be your new home for as little as $800 per month. That’s not costs you gotta pay out. That’s all the income you have to prove you have in order to move to Ecuador.  This is, however, is a requirement for Ecuador’s pensioner visa, not for a general one. Ecuador has no minimum age requirements on pensioner visas, and those claiming they don’t need to even prove they have a pension. You’ve just gotta show that $800 will be landing in your bank account every single month for perpetuity and you’re in. This kinda begs the questions as to why they call it a ‘pensioner visa’, but who are we to argue? The low requirement means people with trust funds, compensation pay outs, and royalties are all able to net an easy visa (probably, don’t quote us on that last one).    Austria  Migrating in Austria is not recommended for those who like their homes nice and cheap. The former seat of Habsburg imperial power, Austria is a tiny country that operates a whole lot like a hipster crafts store: small, fascinating to look at, and so expensive.  Yet Austria does have one thing a hipster store doesn’t have. According to The Telegraph, Austria offers over 10 different types of residence permits. The best part? Absolutely none of them require any form of inward investment.  The bad news is that you need to apply for your residence card abroad (i.e. not in Austria). The good news is this doesn’t apply to EU citizens or Americans. If you’re an American, you can just get a D-Visa, giving you up to 6 months’ leave to stay in the country, then go to Austria, secure a job/wife, and then apply for a proper residence visa. Just remember to smile smugly at all those struggling Canadians and Australians as you waltz your way to the front of the immigration line.    Belgium Germany’s go-to country to invade after Poland, tiny Belgium is one of northern Europe’s tiniest states. Slightly smaller than Maryland, it boasts a whole lotta flat and whole lotta roads. On the other hand, it also has some of the most attractive small towns on the continent. It’s also fairly easy to get a long-term residency. The one thing you have to do? Get a job.  In Belgium, not only will they let you apply for work as an outsider, they’ll then offer you a residency permit after just two weeks of employment. This isn’t a permanent residency permit but it’s certainly a step in the right direction. All you gotta do next is hold onto your job for long enough (it varies by region), and you’ll be laughing all the way to the Belgian citizenship test. The only downside is you need to actually be employable for this plan to work.    Paraguay Nothing could be simpler than getting residency in Paraguay. Probably thanks to its terminal obscurity, the government seems desperate to get as many people into the landlocked South American nation as possible. As a result, there’s only one hard and fast requirement. You need to deposit money in a Paraguayan bank. A small amount won’t do, but you don’t have to go too big. Around 35 times the monthly minimum wage is the accepted sum (between $4,500-$5,500 USD). Of the 6 million or so people who live there, at least half of them probably pretend they’re from Argentina. It’s a poor, underdeveloped country surrounded by bigger, way more developed countries. Still, at least it’s cheap.  Costa Rica Costa Rica has been popular with expats for over 30 years due to its easy-going lifestyle and gorgeous ocean-side landscapes. Actually, water lovers of all kinds will thrive in Costa Rica, as it boasts the second largest number of rivers and water bodies anywhere in the world. As you can imagine, a wide range of native fauna comes along with that, including over 300 species of a hummingbird!  Costa Rica is a wonderful place for retirees, offering a visa program that welcomes older folks with at least $1,000/month in income. For the working set, you will need a job to settle there. Luckily, Costa Rica has a lot of job opportunities, especially around tourism and teaching English.    Canada Like the hippy younger sibling to America’s hard-working grownup, Canada always takes a contrary liberal stance to the USA. That includes on immigration. Canada is casting its arms to open wide to the surrounding world. Luckily, that includes to you, provided you can prove you’re worth having. Canada’s immigration rules depends entirely on how skilled you are.  For those with the skills or education level that Canada needs, there’s an express entry program that’s so swift, it probably amounts to kidnapping. You fill in an online form, which assigns you points for stuff like education level, industries worked in, and whether you are able to speak French. If you hit a high score on these, plus other stuff like whether you studied in Canada or have Canadian relatives, you’re probably in. All you gotta do next is pony up about $500 CAD ($390 in real dollars).  Cambodia Though steeped in a bloody history, Cambodia is now one of the fastest-growing economies in Asia. It is a good choice for people who crave a change from their first-world ideals, as the customs will be very new to most.  For example, people in Cambodia don’t celebrate their birthdays, and lots of adults don’t even know how old they are. Fast food is not very popular, and the preferred method of travel is the moped.  To live in Cambodia, you can get a long-term business visa without needing to be sponsored by a local company. This visa can be renewed indefinitely but doesn’t grant the right to work for a Cambodian company. You will need to apply for a work permit in order to get a job there, but you may find that employers are lax about enforcing that requirement.    Belize An English-speaking nation in Central America, complete with ultra-low cost of living and the sort of beaches. Wedged awkwardly between Mexico and Guatemala, this paradise is barely larger than Wales and comes with a very small population.  You can apply for permanent residency in Belize after only a year there. To stay there for a year, all you have to do is arrive on a 30-day tourist visa, and keep renewing it every 30 days. When you hit the 50-week mark, pay $1,000 and, after jumping through some bureaucratic hoops, you should be in. Just be careful of the requirement some departments have that you leave the country for two weeks every 6 months. Doing so will reset your year-long countdown.    Nicaragua It might be a shock for those who remember 1980s Nicaragua as a place of leftist coups, civil wars, and rightwing Contras, but Nicaragua is gorgeous.  Provided you can ignore the politics, Nicaragua is the place you always wanted to go home to. Nicaragua runs a retirement program, just like Ecuador. And, just like Ecuador, they take their own entry requirements with a pinch of salt. Provided you can prove an income of $600 a month, you neither have to be old nor, technically, retired.   While most countries don’t let those on retirement visas to work, Nicaragua’s government defines work so loosely you kinda wonder why they bother at all. If you open a restaurant or a small hotel, they don’t define it as work. If you get an income working digitally for a non-Nicaraguan company, they don’t define it as work.    Panama Panama, is technically an independent part of Central America, but in reality looking and feeling like a part of Florida that broke off and floated south, Panama is moving abroad for those who don’t want the hassle and inconvenience that moving abroad usually entails. It’s safe, well developed, a lot of people speak English, and it uses the US dollar. Practically anyone can move there with effectively zero effort.  Most Americans that head to Panama do so on the retiree visa, which gives holders massive discounts on a ton of stuff, while only requiring a monthly income of $1,000. But the residency visa for younger workers is almost equally good. Basically, all you gotta do is deposit $5,000 in a Panamanian bank. Then, if you come from one of 47 ‘friendly countries’ (yeah, that includes USA, Canada, UK, New Zealand, Austria, and the EU), you can get the Friendly Nations Visa. All you need is to find a job or open a business in Panama and you’ve got long-term residency. Just beware that a load of people who get this visa is using it as a massive tax dodge.    Mexico Nothing could be easier than getting permanent leave to remain in Mexico. No, really. Just rock up to the airport/border, and ask to buy an FMM visa. Provided you don’t intend to do any work, the FMM visa allows you to remain in Mexico for 6 months. At that point, you can renew it for another 6 months. Then renew it again. And again. And again, and so on until you finally drop dead. How much does this marvelous, life-changing visa cost? The princely sum of $21.  That’s a layout of $42 a year to legally kick back in a country of pristine beaches, world-class cities, gorgeous colonial towns, and mountain scenery like something out of a dream. Sure, you’re probably gonna need an income to go along with that, but fear not! There are roughly a bazillion Mexican temporary residency visas you can cheaply upgrade to, including some designed for artists, sports players, scientists, and retirees.  All of which just leaves one thing to discuss: the drugs. Yeah, Mexico is in quite a grim place at the moment, with the Drug War having killed tens of thousands in the last decade. Whether you think the risk is worth it is up to you; not everywhere is affected, and some towns are essentially drug-violence free. Just maybe make sure not to do any drugs while you’re there, huh?   Seychelles  Seychelles is a group of 115 gorgeous islands in the western Indian Ocean. Almost half of the available landmass in the country is protected in the form of national parks and reserves, but that still leaves plenty of room for expats craving the beach life and lots of cultural diversity.  All you will need upon arrival in Seychelles is a passport. There are no visa requirements for moving there. If after five years of residence you want to make it official, you will be eligible to apply for citizenship – as long as you haven’t gotten into any legal trouble during that time. Cashed up expats can cut their wait time for citizenship to one year if they invest at least $1 million USD.    Sweden  If you are looking for a high quality of life and progressive political culture, Sweden is a great choice It has been called one of the best countries to be a woman and has the most progressive views regarding gender equality. It also offers generous immigration policies, with a refugee and immigrant population of about 15%.   Sweden is not the easiest country on our list to simply drop into for a long-term stay, because you will need a job offer in order to get a work visa.  However, the immigration process is well automated online, and most people can spend a few months in the country visa-free in order to network.          Svalbard (Norway) The archipelago of Svalbard (pop: 2,642) is indeed part of Norway, but in the same way that Puerto Rico is part of the US or Greenland is part of Denmark. A whole lot of important things have been devolved to the Svalbard administration in Longyearbyen, from gun control to environmental issues, to emergency services, and the issuing of marriage certificates. One of the things that have been devolved is immigration, and Svalbard works on a very different system to Norway. There is no visa regime on Svalbard at all. Literally, anyone can move there and settle down without the need for a permit.  The only thing you need to prove is that you have sufficient funds to support yourself after moving there. This is important because Svalbard is cold. Closer to the North Pole than it is to mainland Norway (itself a very cold country), Svalbard is both freezing and utterly remote. It’s over a thousand miles to the mainland, winters take place in permanent darkness, and hungry polar bears prowl the streets. To cut down on polar bear attacks, unemployment and homelessness are literally illegal, and retirees are deported if they’re considered a drain on society. But hey, at least it’s not your home country, right?   Filed under the category of Moving abroad, job abroad, Canada migration, migration, Filipinos,residency
Cambodia
Though steeped in a bloody history, Cambodia is now one of the fastest-growing economies in Asia. It is a good choice for people who crave a change from their first-world ideals, as the customs will be very new to most.

For example, people in Cambodia don’t celebrate their birthdays, and lots of adults don’t even know how old they are. Fast food is not very popular, and the preferred method of travel is the moped.

To live in Cambodia, you can get a long-term business visa without needing to be sponsored by a local company. This visa can be renewed indefinitely but doesn’t grant the right to work for a Cambodian company. You will need to apply for a work permit in order to get a job there, but you may find that employers are lax about enforcing that requirement.
Moving abroad permanently may not be the easiest thing in the world, it’s also not as hard as many people would think. In some countries, acquiring residency is so easy. Filipinos, in general, seems to have a strong inclination in finding the right country for migration, may it be for finding a better job abroad or to find a country where they would choose to spend the rest of their lives.  Do you know that there are countries where migration is extremely easy?        Ads     Sponsored Links    Ecuador A land of boiling volcanoes, soaring mountain peaks, and old pastel-colored colonial towns, Ecuador is exactly the sort of over-romanticized stereotype of Latin America you’ve always secretly held in your head. It’s got beaches. Islands. Mayan ruins. An adorably underperforming soccer team. It’s got a remarkably low cost of living, and the US dollar as a currency.  This little slice of the south of the border paradise could be your new home for as little as $800 per month. That’s not costs you gotta pay out. That’s all the income you have to prove you have in order to move to Ecuador.  This is, however, is a requirement for Ecuador’s pensioner visa, not for a general one. Ecuador has no minimum age requirements on pensioner visas, and those claiming they don’t need to even prove they have a pension. You’ve just gotta show that $800 will be landing in your bank account every single month for perpetuity and you’re in. This kinda begs the questions as to why they call it a ‘pensioner visa’, but who are we to argue? The low requirement means people with trust funds, compensation pay outs, and royalties are all able to net an easy visa (probably, don’t quote us on that last one).    Austria  Migrating in Austria is not recommended for those who like their homes nice and cheap. The former seat of Habsburg imperial power, Austria is a tiny country that operates a whole lot like a hipster crafts store: small, fascinating to look at, and so expensive.  Yet Austria does have one thing a hipster store doesn’t have. According to The Telegraph, Austria offers over 10 different types of residence permits. The best part? Absolutely none of them require any form of inward investment.  The bad news is that you need to apply for your residence card abroad (i.e. not in Austria). The good news is this doesn’t apply to EU citizens or Americans. If you’re an American, you can just get a D-Visa, giving you up to 6 months’ leave to stay in the country, then go to Austria, secure a job/wife, and then apply for a proper residence visa. Just remember to smile smugly at all those struggling Canadians and Australians as you waltz your way to the front of the immigration line.    Belgium Germany’s go-to country to invade after Poland, tiny Belgium is one of northern Europe’s tiniest states. Slightly smaller than Maryland, it boasts a whole lotta flat and whole lotta roads. On the other hand, it also has some of the most attractive small towns on the continent. It’s also fairly easy to get a long-term residency. The one thing you have to do? Get a job.  In Belgium, not only will they let you apply for work as an outsider, they’ll then offer you a residency permit after just two weeks of employment. This isn’t a permanent residency permit but it’s certainly a step in the right direction. All you gotta do next is hold onto your job for long enough (it varies by region), and you’ll be laughing all the way to the Belgian citizenship test. The only downside is you need to actually be employable for this plan to work.    Paraguay Nothing could be simpler than getting residency in Paraguay. Probably thanks to its terminal obscurity, the government seems desperate to get as many people into the landlocked South American nation as possible. As a result, there’s only one hard and fast requirement. You need to deposit money in a Paraguayan bank. A small amount won’t do, but you don’t have to go too big. Around 35 times the monthly minimum wage is the accepted sum (between $4,500-$5,500 USD). Of the 6 million or so people who live there, at least half of them probably pretend they’re from Argentina. It’s a poor, underdeveloped country surrounded by bigger, way more developed countries. Still, at least it’s cheap.  Costa Rica Costa Rica has been popular with expats for over 30 years due to its easy-going lifestyle and gorgeous ocean-side landscapes. Actually, water lovers of all kinds will thrive in Costa Rica, as it boasts the second largest number of rivers and water bodies anywhere in the world. As you can imagine, a wide range of native fauna comes along with that, including over 300 species of a hummingbird!  Costa Rica is a wonderful place for retirees, offering a visa program that welcomes older folks with at least $1,000/month in income. For the working set, you will need a job to settle there. Luckily, Costa Rica has a lot of job opportunities, especially around tourism and teaching English.    Canada Like the hippy younger sibling to America’s hard-working grownup, Canada always takes a contrary liberal stance to the USA. That includes on immigration. Canada is casting its arms to open wide to the surrounding world. Luckily, that includes to you, provided you can prove you’re worth having. Canada’s immigration rules depends entirely on how skilled you are.  For those with the skills or education level that Canada needs, there’s an express entry program that’s so swift, it probably amounts to kidnapping. You fill in an online form, which assigns you points for stuff like education level, industries worked in, and whether you are able to speak French. If you hit a high score on these, plus other stuff like whether you studied in Canada or have Canadian relatives, you’re probably in. All you gotta do next is pony up about $500 CAD ($390 in real dollars).  Cambodia Though steeped in a bloody history, Cambodia is now one of the fastest-growing economies in Asia. It is a good choice for people who crave a change from their first-world ideals, as the customs will be very new to most.  For example, people in Cambodia don’t celebrate their birthdays, and lots of adults don’t even know how old they are. Fast food is not very popular, and the preferred method of travel is the moped.  To live in Cambodia, you can get a long-term business visa without needing to be sponsored by a local company. This visa can be renewed indefinitely but doesn’t grant the right to work for a Cambodian company. You will need to apply for a work permit in order to get a job there, but you may find that employers are lax about enforcing that requirement.    Belize An English-speaking nation in Central America, complete with ultra-low cost of living and the sort of beaches. Wedged awkwardly between Mexico and Guatemala, this paradise is barely larger than Wales and comes with a very small population.  You can apply for permanent residency in Belize after only a year there. To stay there for a year, all you have to do is arrive on a 30-day tourist visa, and keep renewing it every 30 days. When you hit the 50-week mark, pay $1,000 and, after jumping through some bureaucratic hoops, you should be in. Just be careful of the requirement some departments have that you leave the country for two weeks every 6 months. Doing so will reset your year-long countdown.    Nicaragua It might be a shock for those who remember 1980s Nicaragua as a place of leftist coups, civil wars, and rightwing Contras, but Nicaragua is gorgeous.  Provided you can ignore the politics, Nicaragua is the place you always wanted to go home to. Nicaragua runs a retirement program, just like Ecuador. And, just like Ecuador, they take their own entry requirements with a pinch of salt. Provided you can prove an income of $600 a month, you neither have to be old nor, technically, retired.   While most countries don’t let those on retirement visas to work, Nicaragua’s government defines work so loosely you kinda wonder why they bother at all. If you open a restaurant or a small hotel, they don’t define it as work. If you get an income working digitally for a non-Nicaraguan company, they don’t define it as work.    Panama Panama, is technically an independent part of Central America, but in reality looking and feeling like a part of Florida that broke off and floated south, Panama is moving abroad for those who don’t want the hassle and inconvenience that moving abroad usually entails. It’s safe, well developed, a lot of people speak English, and it uses the US dollar. Practically anyone can move there with effectively zero effort.  Most Americans that head to Panama do so on the retiree visa, which gives holders massive discounts on a ton of stuff, while only requiring a monthly income of $1,000. But the residency visa for younger workers is almost equally good. Basically, all you gotta do is deposit $5,000 in a Panamanian bank. Then, if you come from one of 47 ‘friendly countries’ (yeah, that includes USA, Canada, UK, New Zealand, Austria, and the EU), you can get the Friendly Nations Visa. All you need is to find a job or open a business in Panama and you’ve got long-term residency. Just beware that a load of people who get this visa is using it as a massive tax dodge.    Mexico Nothing could be easier than getting permanent leave to remain in Mexico. No, really. Just rock up to the airport/border, and ask to buy an FMM visa. Provided you don’t intend to do any work, the FMM visa allows you to remain in Mexico for 6 months. At that point, you can renew it for another 6 months. Then renew it again. And again. And again, and so on until you finally drop dead. How much does this marvelous, life-changing visa cost? The princely sum of $21.  That’s a layout of $42 a year to legally kick back in a country of pristine beaches, world-class cities, gorgeous colonial towns, and mountain scenery like something out of a dream. Sure, you’re probably gonna need an income to go along with that, but fear not! There are roughly a bazillion Mexican temporary residency visas you can cheaply upgrade to, including some designed for artists, sports players, scientists, and retirees.  All of which just leaves one thing to discuss: the drugs. Yeah, Mexico is in quite a grim place at the moment, with the Drug War having killed tens of thousands in the last decade. Whether you think the risk is worth it is up to you; not everywhere is affected, and some towns are essentially drug-violence free. Just maybe make sure not to do any drugs while you’re there, huh?   Seychelles  Seychelles is a group of 115 gorgeous islands in the western Indian Ocean. Almost half of the available landmass in the country is protected in the form of national parks and reserves, but that still leaves plenty of room for expats craving the beach life and lots of cultural diversity.  All you will need upon arrival in Seychelles is a passport. There are no visa requirements for moving there. If after five years of residence you want to make it official, you will be eligible to apply for citizenship – as long as you haven’t gotten into any legal trouble during that time. Cashed up expats can cut their wait time for citizenship to one year if they invest at least $1 million USD.    Sweden  If you are looking for a high quality of life and progressive political culture, Sweden is a great choice It has been called one of the best countries to be a woman and has the most progressive views regarding gender equality. It also offers generous immigration policies, with a refugee and immigrant population of about 15%.   Sweden is not the easiest country on our list to simply drop into for a long-term stay, because you will need a job offer in order to get a work visa.  However, the immigration process is well automated online, and most people can spend a few months in the country visa-free in order to network.          Svalbard (Norway) The archipelago of Svalbard (pop: 2,642) is indeed part of Norway, but in the same way that Puerto Rico is part of the US or Greenland is part of Denmark. A whole lot of important things have been devolved to the Svalbard administration in Longyearbyen, from gun control to environmental issues, to emergency services, and the issuing of marriage certificates. One of the things that have been devolved is immigration, and Svalbard works on a very different system to Norway. There is no visa regime on Svalbard at all. Literally, anyone can move there and settle down without the need for a permit.  The only thing you need to prove is that you have sufficient funds to support yourself after moving there. This is important because Svalbard is cold. Closer to the North Pole than it is to mainland Norway (itself a very cold country), Svalbard is both freezing and utterly remote. It’s over a thousand miles to the mainland, winters take place in permanent darkness, and hungry polar bears prowl the streets. To cut down on polar bear attacks, unemployment and homelessness are literally illegal, and retirees are deported if they’re considered a drain on society. But hey, at least it’s not your home country, right?   Filed under the category of Moving abroad, job abroad, Canada migration, migration, Filipinos,residency
Belize
An English-speaking nation in Central America, complete with ultra-low cost of living and the sort of beaches. Wedged awkwardly between Mexico and Guatemala, this paradise is barely larger than Wales and comes with a very small population.

You can apply for permanent residency in Belize after only a year there. To stay there for a year, all you have to do is arrive on a 30-day tourist visa, and keep renewing it every 30 days. When you hit the 50-week mark, pay $1,000 and, after jumping through some bureaucratic hoops, you should be in. Just be careful of the requirement some departments have that you leave the country for two weeks every 6 months. Doing so will reset your year-long countdown.
Moving abroad permanently may not be the easiest thing in the world, it’s also not as hard as many people would think. In some countries, acquiring residency is so easy. Filipinos, in general, seems to have a strong inclination in finding the right country for migration, may it be for finding a better job abroad or to find a country where they would choose to spend the rest of their lives.  Do you know that there are countries where migration is extremely easy?        Ads     Sponsored Links    Ecuador A land of boiling volcanoes, soaring mountain peaks, and old pastel-colored colonial towns, Ecuador is exactly the sort of over-romanticized stereotype of Latin America you’ve always secretly held in your head. It’s got beaches. Islands. Mayan ruins. An adorably underperforming soccer team. It’s got a remarkably low cost of living, and the US dollar as a currency.  This little slice of the south of the border paradise could be your new home for as little as $800 per month. That’s not costs you gotta pay out. That’s all the income you have to prove you have in order to move to Ecuador.  This is, however, is a requirement for Ecuador’s pensioner visa, not for a general one. Ecuador has no minimum age requirements on pensioner visas, and those claiming they don’t need to even prove they have a pension. You’ve just gotta show that $800 will be landing in your bank account every single month for perpetuity and you’re in. This kinda begs the questions as to why they call it a ‘pensioner visa’, but who are we to argue? The low requirement means people with trust funds, compensation pay outs, and royalties are all able to net an easy visa (probably, don’t quote us on that last one).    Austria  Migrating in Austria is not recommended for those who like their homes nice and cheap. The former seat of Habsburg imperial power, Austria is a tiny country that operates a whole lot like a hipster crafts store: small, fascinating to look at, and so expensive.  Yet Austria does have one thing a hipster store doesn’t have. According to The Telegraph, Austria offers over 10 different types of residence permits. The best part? Absolutely none of them require any form of inward investment.  The bad news is that you need to apply for your residence card abroad (i.e. not in Austria). The good news is this doesn’t apply to EU citizens or Americans. If you’re an American, you can just get a D-Visa, giving you up to 6 months’ leave to stay in the country, then go to Austria, secure a job/wife, and then apply for a proper residence visa. Just remember to smile smugly at all those struggling Canadians and Australians as you waltz your way to the front of the immigration line.    Belgium Germany’s go-to country to invade after Poland, tiny Belgium is one of northern Europe’s tiniest states. Slightly smaller than Maryland, it boasts a whole lotta flat and whole lotta roads. On the other hand, it also has some of the most attractive small towns on the continent. It’s also fairly easy to get a long-term residency. The one thing you have to do? Get a job.  In Belgium, not only will they let you apply for work as an outsider, they’ll then offer you a residency permit after just two weeks of employment. This isn’t a permanent residency permit but it’s certainly a step in the right direction. All you gotta do next is hold onto your job for long enough (it varies by region), and you’ll be laughing all the way to the Belgian citizenship test. The only downside is you need to actually be employable for this plan to work.    Paraguay Nothing could be simpler than getting residency in Paraguay. Probably thanks to its terminal obscurity, the government seems desperate to get as many people into the landlocked South American nation as possible. As a result, there’s only one hard and fast requirement. You need to deposit money in a Paraguayan bank. A small amount won’t do, but you don’t have to go too big. Around 35 times the monthly minimum wage is the accepted sum (between $4,500-$5,500 USD). Of the 6 million or so people who live there, at least half of them probably pretend they’re from Argentina. It’s a poor, underdeveloped country surrounded by bigger, way more developed countries. Still, at least it’s cheap.  Costa Rica Costa Rica has been popular with expats for over 30 years due to its easy-going lifestyle and gorgeous ocean-side landscapes. Actually, water lovers of all kinds will thrive in Costa Rica, as it boasts the second largest number of rivers and water bodies anywhere in the world. As you can imagine, a wide range of native fauna comes along with that, including over 300 species of a hummingbird!  Costa Rica is a wonderful place for retirees, offering a visa program that welcomes older folks with at least $1,000/month in income. For the working set, you will need a job to settle there. Luckily, Costa Rica has a lot of job opportunities, especially around tourism and teaching English.    Canada Like the hippy younger sibling to America’s hard-working grownup, Canada always takes a contrary liberal stance to the USA. That includes on immigration. Canada is casting its arms to open wide to the surrounding world. Luckily, that includes to you, provided you can prove you’re worth having. Canada’s immigration rules depends entirely on how skilled you are.  For those with the skills or education level that Canada needs, there’s an express entry program that’s so swift, it probably amounts to kidnapping. You fill in an online form, which assigns you points for stuff like education level, industries worked in, and whether you are able to speak French. If you hit a high score on these, plus other stuff like whether you studied in Canada or have Canadian relatives, you’re probably in. All you gotta do next is pony up about $500 CAD ($390 in real dollars).  Cambodia Though steeped in a bloody history, Cambodia is now one of the fastest-growing economies in Asia. It is a good choice for people who crave a change from their first-world ideals, as the customs will be very new to most.  For example, people in Cambodia don’t celebrate their birthdays, and lots of adults don’t even know how old they are. Fast food is not very popular, and the preferred method of travel is the moped.  To live in Cambodia, you can get a long-term business visa without needing to be sponsored by a local company. This visa can be renewed indefinitely but doesn’t grant the right to work for a Cambodian company. You will need to apply for a work permit in order to get a job there, but you may find that employers are lax about enforcing that requirement.    Belize An English-speaking nation in Central America, complete with ultra-low cost of living and the sort of beaches. Wedged awkwardly between Mexico and Guatemala, this paradise is barely larger than Wales and comes with a very small population.  You can apply for permanent residency in Belize after only a year there. To stay there for a year, all you have to do is arrive on a 30-day tourist visa, and keep renewing it every 30 days. When you hit the 50-week mark, pay $1,000 and, after jumping through some bureaucratic hoops, you should be in. Just be careful of the requirement some departments have that you leave the country for two weeks every 6 months. Doing so will reset your year-long countdown.    Nicaragua It might be a shock for those who remember 1980s Nicaragua as a place of leftist coups, civil wars, and rightwing Contras, but Nicaragua is gorgeous.  Provided you can ignore the politics, Nicaragua is the place you always wanted to go home to. Nicaragua runs a retirement program, just like Ecuador. And, just like Ecuador, they take their own entry requirements with a pinch of salt. Provided you can prove an income of $600 a month, you neither have to be old nor, technically, retired.   While most countries don’t let those on retirement visas to work, Nicaragua’s government defines work so loosely you kinda wonder why they bother at all. If you open a restaurant or a small hotel, they don’t define it as work. If you get an income working digitally for a non-Nicaraguan company, they don’t define it as work.    Panama Panama, is technically an independent part of Central America, but in reality looking and feeling like a part of Florida that broke off and floated south, Panama is moving abroad for those who don’t want the hassle and inconvenience that moving abroad usually entails. It’s safe, well developed, a lot of people speak English, and it uses the US dollar. Practically anyone can move there with effectively zero effort.  Most Americans that head to Panama do so on the retiree visa, which gives holders massive discounts on a ton of stuff, while only requiring a monthly income of $1,000. But the residency visa for younger workers is almost equally good. Basically, all you gotta do is deposit $5,000 in a Panamanian bank. Then, if you come from one of 47 ‘friendly countries’ (yeah, that includes USA, Canada, UK, New Zealand, Austria, and the EU), you can get the Friendly Nations Visa. All you need is to find a job or open a business in Panama and you’ve got long-term residency. Just beware that a load of people who get this visa is using it as a massive tax dodge.    Mexico Nothing could be easier than getting permanent leave to remain in Mexico. No, really. Just rock up to the airport/border, and ask to buy an FMM visa. Provided you don’t intend to do any work, the FMM visa allows you to remain in Mexico for 6 months. At that point, you can renew it for another 6 months. Then renew it again. And again. And again, and so on until you finally drop dead. How much does this marvelous, life-changing visa cost? The princely sum of $21.  That’s a layout of $42 a year to legally kick back in a country of pristine beaches, world-class cities, gorgeous colonial towns, and mountain scenery like something out of a dream. Sure, you’re probably gonna need an income to go along with that, but fear not! There are roughly a bazillion Mexican temporary residency visas you can cheaply upgrade to, including some designed for artists, sports players, scientists, and retirees.  All of which just leaves one thing to discuss: the drugs. Yeah, Mexico is in quite a grim place at the moment, with the Drug War having killed tens of thousands in the last decade. Whether you think the risk is worth it is up to you; not everywhere is affected, and some towns are essentially drug-violence free. Just maybe make sure not to do any drugs while you’re there, huh?   Seychelles  Seychelles is a group of 115 gorgeous islands in the western Indian Ocean. Almost half of the available landmass in the country is protected in the form of national parks and reserves, but that still leaves plenty of room for expats craving the beach life and lots of cultural diversity.  All you will need upon arrival in Seychelles is a passport. There are no visa requirements for moving there. If after five years of residence you want to make it official, you will be eligible to apply for citizenship – as long as you haven’t gotten into any legal trouble during that time. Cashed up expats can cut their wait time for citizenship to one year if they invest at least $1 million USD.    Sweden  If you are looking for a high quality of life and progressive political culture, Sweden is a great choice It has been called one of the best countries to be a woman and has the most progressive views regarding gender equality. It also offers generous immigration policies, with a refugee and immigrant population of about 15%.   Sweden is not the easiest country on our list to simply drop into for a long-term stay, because you will need a job offer in order to get a work visa.  However, the immigration process is well automated online, and most people can spend a few months in the country visa-free in order to network.          Svalbard (Norway) The archipelago of Svalbard (pop: 2,642) is indeed part of Norway, but in the same way that Puerto Rico is part of the US or Greenland is part of Denmark. A whole lot of important things have been devolved to the Svalbard administration in Longyearbyen, from gun control to environmental issues, to emergency services, and the issuing of marriage certificates. One of the things that have been devolved is immigration, and Svalbard works on a very different system to Norway. There is no visa regime on Svalbard at all. Literally, anyone can move there and settle down without the need for a permit.  The only thing you need to prove is that you have sufficient funds to support yourself after moving there. This is important because Svalbard is cold. Closer to the North Pole than it is to mainland Norway (itself a very cold country), Svalbard is both freezing and utterly remote. It’s over a thousand miles to the mainland, winters take place in permanent darkness, and hungry polar bears prowl the streets. To cut down on polar bear attacks, unemployment and homelessness are literally illegal, and retirees are deported if they’re considered a drain on society. But hey, at least it’s not your home country, right?   Filed under the category of Moving abroad, job abroad, Canada migration, migration, Filipinos,residency
Nicaragua
It might be a shock for those who remember 1980s Nicaragua as a place of leftist coups, civil wars, and rightwing Contras, but Nicaragua is gorgeous.  Provided you can ignore the politics, Nicaragua is the place you always wanted to go home to.
Nicaragua runs a retirement program, just like Ecuador. And, just like Ecuador, they take their own entry requirements with a pinch of salt. Provided you can prove an income of $600 a month, you neither have to be old nor, technically, retired.

While most countries don’t let those on retirement visas to work, Nicaragua’s government defines work so loosely you kinda wonder why they bother at all. If you open a restaurant or a small hotel, they don’t define it as work. If you get an income working digitally for a non-Nicaraguan company, they don’t define it as work.
Moving abroad permanently may not be the easiest thing in the world, it’s also not as hard as many people would think. In some countries, acquiring residency is so easy. Filipinos, in general, seems to have a strong inclination in finding the right country for migration, may it be for finding a better job abroad or to find a country where they would choose to spend the rest of their lives.  Do you know that there are countries where migration is extremely easy?        Ads     Sponsored Links    Ecuador A land of boiling volcanoes, soaring mountain peaks, and old pastel-colored colonial towns, Ecuador is exactly the sort of over-romanticized stereotype of Latin America you’ve always secretly held in your head. It’s got beaches. Islands. Mayan ruins. An adorably underperforming soccer team. It’s got a remarkably low cost of living, and the US dollar as a currency.  This little slice of the south of the border paradise could be your new home for as little as $800 per month. That’s not costs you gotta pay out. That’s all the income you have to prove you have in order to move to Ecuador.  This is, however, is a requirement for Ecuador’s pensioner visa, not for a general one. Ecuador has no minimum age requirements on pensioner visas, and those claiming they don’t need to even prove they have a pension. You’ve just gotta show that $800 will be landing in your bank account every single month for perpetuity and you’re in. This kinda begs the questions as to why they call it a ‘pensioner visa’, but who are we to argue? The low requirement means people with trust funds, compensation pay outs, and royalties are all able to net an easy visa (probably, don’t quote us on that last one).    Austria  Migrating in Austria is not recommended for those who like their homes nice and cheap. The former seat of Habsburg imperial power, Austria is a tiny country that operates a whole lot like a hipster crafts store: small, fascinating to look at, and so expensive.  Yet Austria does have one thing a hipster store doesn’t have. According to The Telegraph, Austria offers over 10 different types of residence permits. The best part? Absolutely none of them require any form of inward investment.  The bad news is that you need to apply for your residence card abroad (i.e. not in Austria). The good news is this doesn’t apply to EU citizens or Americans. If you’re an American, you can just get a D-Visa, giving you up to 6 months’ leave to stay in the country, then go to Austria, secure a job/wife, and then apply for a proper residence visa. Just remember to smile smugly at all those struggling Canadians and Australians as you waltz your way to the front of the immigration line.    Belgium Germany’s go-to country to invade after Poland, tiny Belgium is one of northern Europe’s tiniest states. Slightly smaller than Maryland, it boasts a whole lotta flat and whole lotta roads. On the other hand, it also has some of the most attractive small towns on the continent. It’s also fairly easy to get a long-term residency. The one thing you have to do? Get a job.  In Belgium, not only will they let you apply for work as an outsider, they’ll then offer you a residency permit after just two weeks of employment. This isn’t a permanent residency permit but it’s certainly a step in the right direction. All you gotta do next is hold onto your job for long enough (it varies by region), and you’ll be laughing all the way to the Belgian citizenship test. The only downside is you need to actually be employable for this plan to work.    Paraguay Nothing could be simpler than getting residency in Paraguay. Probably thanks to its terminal obscurity, the government seems desperate to get as many people into the landlocked South American nation as possible. As a result, there’s only one hard and fast requirement. You need to deposit money in a Paraguayan bank. A small amount won’t do, but you don’t have to go too big. Around 35 times the monthly minimum wage is the accepted sum (between $4,500-$5,500 USD). Of the 6 million or so people who live there, at least half of them probably pretend they’re from Argentina. It’s a poor, underdeveloped country surrounded by bigger, way more developed countries. Still, at least it’s cheap.  Costa Rica Costa Rica has been popular with expats for over 30 years due to its easy-going lifestyle and gorgeous ocean-side landscapes. Actually, water lovers of all kinds will thrive in Costa Rica, as it boasts the second largest number of rivers and water bodies anywhere in the world. As you can imagine, a wide range of native fauna comes along with that, including over 300 species of a hummingbird!  Costa Rica is a wonderful place for retirees, offering a visa program that welcomes older folks with at least $1,000/month in income. For the working set, you will need a job to settle there. Luckily, Costa Rica has a lot of job opportunities, especially around tourism and teaching English.    Canada Like the hippy younger sibling to America’s hard-working grownup, Canada always takes a contrary liberal stance to the USA. That includes on immigration. Canada is casting its arms to open wide to the surrounding world. Luckily, that includes to you, provided you can prove you’re worth having. Canada’s immigration rules depends entirely on how skilled you are.  For those with the skills or education level that Canada needs, there’s an express entry program that’s so swift, it probably amounts to kidnapping. You fill in an online form, which assigns you points for stuff like education level, industries worked in, and whether you are able to speak French. If you hit a high score on these, plus other stuff like whether you studied in Canada or have Canadian relatives, you’re probably in. All you gotta do next is pony up about $500 CAD ($390 in real dollars).  Cambodia Though steeped in a bloody history, Cambodia is now one of the fastest-growing economies in Asia. It is a good choice for people who crave a change from their first-world ideals, as the customs will be very new to most.  For example, people in Cambodia don’t celebrate their birthdays, and lots of adults don’t even know how old they are. Fast food is not very popular, and the preferred method of travel is the moped.  To live in Cambodia, you can get a long-term business visa without needing to be sponsored by a local company. This visa can be renewed indefinitely but doesn’t grant the right to work for a Cambodian company. You will need to apply for a work permit in order to get a job there, but you may find that employers are lax about enforcing that requirement.    Belize An English-speaking nation in Central America, complete with ultra-low cost of living and the sort of beaches. Wedged awkwardly between Mexico and Guatemala, this paradise is barely larger than Wales and comes with a very small population.  You can apply for permanent residency in Belize after only a year there. To stay there for a year, all you have to do is arrive on a 30-day tourist visa, and keep renewing it every 30 days. When you hit the 50-week mark, pay $1,000 and, after jumping through some bureaucratic hoops, you should be in. Just be careful of the requirement some departments have that you leave the country for two weeks every 6 months. Doing so will reset your year-long countdown.    Nicaragua It might be a shock for those who remember 1980s Nicaragua as a place of leftist coups, civil wars, and rightwing Contras, but Nicaragua is gorgeous.  Provided you can ignore the politics, Nicaragua is the place you always wanted to go home to. Nicaragua runs a retirement program, just like Ecuador. And, just like Ecuador, they take their own entry requirements with a pinch of salt. Provided you can prove an income of $600 a month, you neither have to be old nor, technically, retired.   While most countries don’t let those on retirement visas to work, Nicaragua’s government defines work so loosely you kinda wonder why they bother at all. If you open a restaurant or a small hotel, they don’t define it as work. If you get an income working digitally for a non-Nicaraguan company, they don’t define it as work.    Panama Panama, is technically an independent part of Central America, but in reality looking and feeling like a part of Florida that broke off and floated south, Panama is moving abroad for those who don’t want the hassle and inconvenience that moving abroad usually entails. It’s safe, well developed, a lot of people speak English, and it uses the US dollar. Practically anyone can move there with effectively zero effort.  Most Americans that head to Panama do so on the retiree visa, which gives holders massive discounts on a ton of stuff, while only requiring a monthly income of $1,000. But the residency visa for younger workers is almost equally good. Basically, all you gotta do is deposit $5,000 in a Panamanian bank. Then, if you come from one of 47 ‘friendly countries’ (yeah, that includes USA, Canada, UK, New Zealand, Austria, and the EU), you can get the Friendly Nations Visa. All you need is to find a job or open a business in Panama and you’ve got long-term residency. Just beware that a load of people who get this visa is using it as a massive tax dodge.    Mexico Nothing could be easier than getting permanent leave to remain in Mexico. No, really. Just rock up to the airport/border, and ask to buy an FMM visa. Provided you don’t intend to do any work, the FMM visa allows you to remain in Mexico for 6 months. At that point, you can renew it for another 6 months. Then renew it again. And again. And again, and so on until you finally drop dead. How much does this marvelous, life-changing visa cost? The princely sum of $21.  That’s a layout of $42 a year to legally kick back in a country of pristine beaches, world-class cities, gorgeous colonial towns, and mountain scenery like something out of a dream. Sure, you’re probably gonna need an income to go along with that, but fear not! There are roughly a bazillion Mexican temporary residency visas you can cheaply upgrade to, including some designed for artists, sports players, scientists, and retirees.  All of which just leaves one thing to discuss: the drugs. Yeah, Mexico is in quite a grim place at the moment, with the Drug War having killed tens of thousands in the last decade. Whether you think the risk is worth it is up to you; not everywhere is affected, and some towns are essentially drug-violence free. Just maybe make sure not to do any drugs while you’re there, huh?   Seychelles  Seychelles is a group of 115 gorgeous islands in the western Indian Ocean. Almost half of the available landmass in the country is protected in the form of national parks and reserves, but that still leaves plenty of room for expats craving the beach life and lots of cultural diversity.  All you will need upon arrival in Seychelles is a passport. There are no visa requirements for moving there. If after five years of residence you want to make it official, you will be eligible to apply for citizenship – as long as you haven’t gotten into any legal trouble during that time. Cashed up expats can cut their wait time for citizenship to one year if they invest at least $1 million USD.    Sweden  If you are looking for a high quality of life and progressive political culture, Sweden is a great choice It has been called one of the best countries to be a woman and has the most progressive views regarding gender equality. It also offers generous immigration policies, with a refugee and immigrant population of about 15%.   Sweden is not the easiest country on our list to simply drop into for a long-term stay, because you will need a job offer in order to get a work visa.  However, the immigration process is well automated online, and most people can spend a few months in the country visa-free in order to network.          Svalbard (Norway) The archipelago of Svalbard (pop: 2,642) is indeed part of Norway, but in the same way that Puerto Rico is part of the US or Greenland is part of Denmark. A whole lot of important things have been devolved to the Svalbard administration in Longyearbyen, from gun control to environmental issues, to emergency services, and the issuing of marriage certificates. One of the things that have been devolved is immigration, and Svalbard works on a very different system to Norway. There is no visa regime on Svalbard at all. Literally, anyone can move there and settle down without the need for a permit.  The only thing you need to prove is that you have sufficient funds to support yourself after moving there. This is important because Svalbard is cold. Closer to the North Pole than it is to mainland Norway (itself a very cold country), Svalbard is both freezing and utterly remote. It’s over a thousand miles to the mainland, winters take place in permanent darkness, and hungry polar bears prowl the streets. To cut down on polar bear attacks, unemployment and homelessness are literally illegal, and retirees are deported if they’re considered a drain on society. But hey, at least it’s not your home country, right?   Filed under the category of Moving abroad, job abroad, Canada migration, migration, Filipinos,residency
Panama
Panama, is technically an independent part of Central America, but in reality looking and feeling like a part of Florida that broke off and floated south, Panama is moving abroad for those who don’t want the hassle and inconvenience that moving abroad usually entails. It’s safe, well developed, a lot of people speak English, and it uses the US dollar. Practically anyone can move there with effectively zero effort.

Most Americans that head to Panama do so on the retiree visa, which gives holders massive discounts on a ton of stuff, while only requiring a monthly income of $1,000. But the residency visa for younger workers is almost equally good. Basically, all you gotta do is deposit $5,000 in a Panamanian bank. Then, if you come from one of 47 ‘friendly countries’ (yeah, that includes USA, Canada, UK, New Zealand, Austria, and the EU), you can get the Friendly Nations Visa. All you need is to find a job or open a business in Panama and you’ve got long-term residency. Just beware that a load of people who get this visa is using it as a massive tax dodge.
Moving abroad permanently may not be the easiest thing in the world, it’s also not as hard as many people would think. In some countries, acquiring residency is so easy. Filipinos, in general, seems to have a strong inclination in finding the right country for migration, may it be for finding a better job abroad or to find a country where they would choose to spend the rest of their lives.  Do you know that there are countries where migration is extremely easy?        Ads     Sponsored Links    Ecuador A land of boiling volcanoes, soaring mountain peaks, and old pastel-colored colonial towns, Ecuador is exactly the sort of over-romanticized stereotype of Latin America you’ve always secretly held in your head. It’s got beaches. Islands. Mayan ruins. An adorably underperforming soccer team. It’s got a remarkably low cost of living, and the US dollar as a currency.  This little slice of the south of the border paradise could be your new home for as little as $800 per month. That’s not costs you gotta pay out. That’s all the income you have to prove you have in order to move to Ecuador.  This is, however, is a requirement for Ecuador’s pensioner visa, not for a general one. Ecuador has no minimum age requirements on pensioner visas, and those claiming they don’t need to even prove they have a pension. You’ve just gotta show that $800 will be landing in your bank account every single month for perpetuity and you’re in. This kinda begs the questions as to why they call it a ‘pensioner visa’, but who are we to argue? The low requirement means people with trust funds, compensation pay outs, and royalties are all able to net an easy visa (probably, don’t quote us on that last one).    Austria  Migrating in Austria is not recommended for those who like their homes nice and cheap. The former seat of Habsburg imperial power, Austria is a tiny country that operates a whole lot like a hipster crafts store: small, fascinating to look at, and so expensive.  Yet Austria does have one thing a hipster store doesn’t have. According to The Telegraph, Austria offers over 10 different types of residence permits. The best part? Absolutely none of them require any form of inward investment.  The bad news is that you need to apply for your residence card abroad (i.e. not in Austria). The good news is this doesn’t apply to EU citizens or Americans. If you’re an American, you can just get a D-Visa, giving you up to 6 months’ leave to stay in the country, then go to Austria, secure a job/wife, and then apply for a proper residence visa. Just remember to smile smugly at all those struggling Canadians and Australians as you waltz your way to the front of the immigration line.    Belgium Germany’s go-to country to invade after Poland, tiny Belgium is one of northern Europe’s tiniest states. Slightly smaller than Maryland, it boasts a whole lotta flat and whole lotta roads. On the other hand, it also has some of the most attractive small towns on the continent. It’s also fairly easy to get a long-term residency. The one thing you have to do? Get a job.  In Belgium, not only will they let you apply for work as an outsider, they’ll then offer you a residency permit after just two weeks of employment. This isn’t a permanent residency permit but it’s certainly a step in the right direction. All you gotta do next is hold onto your job for long enough (it varies by region), and you’ll be laughing all the way to the Belgian citizenship test. The only downside is you need to actually be employable for this plan to work.    Paraguay Nothing could be simpler than getting residency in Paraguay. Probably thanks to its terminal obscurity, the government seems desperate to get as many people into the landlocked South American nation as possible. As a result, there’s only one hard and fast requirement. You need to deposit money in a Paraguayan bank. A small amount won’t do, but you don’t have to go too big. Around 35 times the monthly minimum wage is the accepted sum (between $4,500-$5,500 USD). Of the 6 million or so people who live there, at least half of them probably pretend they’re from Argentina. It’s a poor, underdeveloped country surrounded by bigger, way more developed countries. Still, at least it’s cheap.  Costa Rica Costa Rica has been popular with expats for over 30 years due to its easy-going lifestyle and gorgeous ocean-side landscapes. Actually, water lovers of all kinds will thrive in Costa Rica, as it boasts the second largest number of rivers and water bodies anywhere in the world. As you can imagine, a wide range of native fauna comes along with that, including over 300 species of a hummingbird!  Costa Rica is a wonderful place for retirees, offering a visa program that welcomes older folks with at least $1,000/month in income. For the working set, you will need a job to settle there. Luckily, Costa Rica has a lot of job opportunities, especially around tourism and teaching English.    Canada Like the hippy younger sibling to America’s hard-working grownup, Canada always takes a contrary liberal stance to the USA. That includes on immigration. Canada is casting its arms to open wide to the surrounding world. Luckily, that includes to you, provided you can prove you’re worth having. Canada’s immigration rules depends entirely on how skilled you are.  For those with the skills or education level that Canada needs, there’s an express entry program that’s so swift, it probably amounts to kidnapping. You fill in an online form, which assigns you points for stuff like education level, industries worked in, and whether you are able to speak French. If you hit a high score on these, plus other stuff like whether you studied in Canada or have Canadian relatives, you’re probably in. All you gotta do next is pony up about $500 CAD ($390 in real dollars).  Cambodia Though steeped in a bloody history, Cambodia is now one of the fastest-growing economies in Asia. It is a good choice for people who crave a change from their first-world ideals, as the customs will be very new to most.  For example, people in Cambodia don’t celebrate their birthdays, and lots of adults don’t even know how old they are. Fast food is not very popular, and the preferred method of travel is the moped.  To live in Cambodia, you can get a long-term business visa without needing to be sponsored by a local company. This visa can be renewed indefinitely but doesn’t grant the right to work for a Cambodian company. You will need to apply for a work permit in order to get a job there, but you may find that employers are lax about enforcing that requirement.    Belize An English-speaking nation in Central America, complete with ultra-low cost of living and the sort of beaches. Wedged awkwardly between Mexico and Guatemala, this paradise is barely larger than Wales and comes with a very small population.  You can apply for permanent residency in Belize after only a year there. To stay there for a year, all you have to do is arrive on a 30-day tourist visa, and keep renewing it every 30 days. When you hit the 50-week mark, pay $1,000 and, after jumping through some bureaucratic hoops, you should be in. Just be careful of the requirement some departments have that you leave the country for two weeks every 6 months. Doing so will reset your year-long countdown.    Nicaragua It might be a shock for those who remember 1980s Nicaragua as a place of leftist coups, civil wars, and rightwing Contras, but Nicaragua is gorgeous.  Provided you can ignore the politics, Nicaragua is the place you always wanted to go home to. Nicaragua runs a retirement program, just like Ecuador. And, just like Ecuador, they take their own entry requirements with a pinch of salt. Provided you can prove an income of $600 a month, you neither have to be old nor, technically, retired.   While most countries don’t let those on retirement visas to work, Nicaragua’s government defines work so loosely you kinda wonder why they bother at all. If you open a restaurant or a small hotel, they don’t define it as work. If you get an income working digitally for a non-Nicaraguan company, they don’t define it as work.    Panama Panama, is technically an independent part of Central America, but in reality looking and feeling like a part of Florida that broke off and floated south, Panama is moving abroad for those who don’t want the hassle and inconvenience that moving abroad usually entails. It’s safe, well developed, a lot of people speak English, and it uses the US dollar. Practically anyone can move there with effectively zero effort.  Most Americans that head to Panama do so on the retiree visa, which gives holders massive discounts on a ton of stuff, while only requiring a monthly income of $1,000. But the residency visa for younger workers is almost equally good. Basically, all you gotta do is deposit $5,000 in a Panamanian bank. Then, if you come from one of 47 ‘friendly countries’ (yeah, that includes USA, Canada, UK, New Zealand, Austria, and the EU), you can get the Friendly Nations Visa. All you need is to find a job or open a business in Panama and you’ve got long-term residency. Just beware that a load of people who get this visa is using it as a massive tax dodge.    Mexico Nothing could be easier than getting permanent leave to remain in Mexico. No, really. Just rock up to the airport/border, and ask to buy an FMM visa. Provided you don’t intend to do any work, the FMM visa allows you to remain in Mexico for 6 months. At that point, you can renew it for another 6 months. Then renew it again. And again. And again, and so on until you finally drop dead. How much does this marvelous, life-changing visa cost? The princely sum of $21.  That’s a layout of $42 a year to legally kick back in a country of pristine beaches, world-class cities, gorgeous colonial towns, and mountain scenery like something out of a dream. Sure, you’re probably gonna need an income to go along with that, but fear not! There are roughly a bazillion Mexican temporary residency visas you can cheaply upgrade to, including some designed for artists, sports players, scientists, and retirees.  All of which just leaves one thing to discuss: the drugs. Yeah, Mexico is in quite a grim place at the moment, with the Drug War having killed tens of thousands in the last decade. Whether you think the risk is worth it is up to you; not everywhere is affected, and some towns are essentially drug-violence free. Just maybe make sure not to do any drugs while you’re there, huh?   Seychelles  Seychelles is a group of 115 gorgeous islands in the western Indian Ocean. Almost half of the available landmass in the country is protected in the form of national parks and reserves, but that still leaves plenty of room for expats craving the beach life and lots of cultural diversity.  All you will need upon arrival in Seychelles is a passport. There are no visa requirements for moving there. If after five years of residence you want to make it official, you will be eligible to apply for citizenship – as long as you haven’t gotten into any legal trouble during that time. Cashed up expats can cut their wait time for citizenship to one year if they invest at least $1 million USD.    Sweden  If you are looking for a high quality of life and progressive political culture, Sweden is a great choice It has been called one of the best countries to be a woman and has the most progressive views regarding gender equality. It also offers generous immigration policies, with a refugee and immigrant population of about 15%.   Sweden is not the easiest country on our list to simply drop into for a long-term stay, because you will need a job offer in order to get a work visa.  However, the immigration process is well automated online, and most people can spend a few months in the country visa-free in order to network.          Svalbard (Norway) The archipelago of Svalbard (pop: 2,642) is indeed part of Norway, but in the same way that Puerto Rico is part of the US or Greenland is part of Denmark. A whole lot of important things have been devolved to the Svalbard administration in Longyearbyen, from gun control to environmental issues, to emergency services, and the issuing of marriage certificates. One of the things that have been devolved is immigration, and Svalbard works on a very different system to Norway. There is no visa regime on Svalbard at all. Literally, anyone can move there and settle down without the need for a permit.  The only thing you need to prove is that you have sufficient funds to support yourself after moving there. This is important because Svalbard is cold. Closer to the North Pole than it is to mainland Norway (itself a very cold country), Svalbard is both freezing and utterly remote. It’s over a thousand miles to the mainland, winters take place in permanent darkness, and hungry polar bears prowl the streets. To cut down on polar bear attacks, unemployment and homelessness are literally illegal, and retirees are deported if they’re considered a drain on society. But hey, at least it’s not your home country, right?   Filed under the category of Moving abroad, job abroad, Canada migration, migration, Filipinos,residency
Mexico
Nothing could be easier than getting permanent leave to remain in Mexico. No, really. Just rock up to the airport/border, and ask to buy an FMM visa. Provided you don’t intend to do any work, the FMM visa allows you to remain in Mexico for 6 months. At that point, you can renew it for another 6 months. Then renew it again. And again. And again, and so on until you finally drop dead. How much does this marvelous, life-changing visa cost? The princely sum of $21.

That’s a layout of $42 a year to legally kick back in a country of pristine beaches, world-class cities, gorgeous colonial towns, and mountain scenery like something out of a dream. Sure, you’re probably gonna need an income to go along with that, but fear not! There are roughly a bazillion Mexican temporary residency visas you can cheaply upgrade to, including some designed for artists, sports players, scientists, and retirees.

All of which just leaves one thing to discuss: the drugs. Yeah, Mexico is in quite a grim place at the moment, with the Drug War having killed tens of thousands in the last decade. Whether you think the risk is worth it is up to you; not everywhere is affected, and some towns are essentially drug-violence free. Just maybe make sure not to do any drugs while you’re there, huh?
Moving abroad permanently may not be the easiest thing in the world, it’s also not as hard as many people would think. In some countries, acquiring residency is so easy. Filipinos, in general, seems to have a strong inclination in finding the right country for migration, may it be for finding a better job abroad or to find a country where they would choose to spend the rest of their lives.  Do you know that there are countries where migration is extremely easy?        Ads     Sponsored Links    Ecuador A land of boiling volcanoes, soaring mountain peaks, and old pastel-colored colonial towns, Ecuador is exactly the sort of over-romanticized stereotype of Latin America you’ve always secretly held in your head. It’s got beaches. Islands. Mayan ruins. An adorably underperforming soccer team. It’s got a remarkably low cost of living, and the US dollar as a currency.  This little slice of the south of the border paradise could be your new home for as little as $800 per month. That’s not costs you gotta pay out. That’s all the income you have to prove you have in order to move to Ecuador.  This is, however, is a requirement for Ecuador’s pensioner visa, not for a general one. Ecuador has no minimum age requirements on pensioner visas, and those claiming they don’t need to even prove they have a pension. You’ve just gotta show that $800 will be landing in your bank account every single month for perpetuity and you’re in. This kinda begs the questions as to why they call it a ‘pensioner visa’, but who are we to argue? The low requirement means people with trust funds, compensation pay outs, and royalties are all able to net an easy visa (probably, don’t quote us on that last one).    Austria  Migrating in Austria is not recommended for those who like their homes nice and cheap. The former seat of Habsburg imperial power, Austria is a tiny country that operates a whole lot like a hipster crafts store: small, fascinating to look at, and so expensive.  Yet Austria does have one thing a hipster store doesn’t have. According to The Telegraph, Austria offers over 10 different types of residence permits. The best part? Absolutely none of them require any form of inward investment.  The bad news is that you need to apply for your residence card abroad (i.e. not in Austria). The good news is this doesn’t apply to EU citizens or Americans. If you’re an American, you can just get a D-Visa, giving you up to 6 months’ leave to stay in the country, then go to Austria, secure a job/wife, and then apply for a proper residence visa. Just remember to smile smugly at all those struggling Canadians and Australians as you waltz your way to the front of the immigration line.    Belgium Germany’s go-to country to invade after Poland, tiny Belgium is one of northern Europe’s tiniest states. Slightly smaller than Maryland, it boasts a whole lotta flat and whole lotta roads. On the other hand, it also has some of the most attractive small towns on the continent. It’s also fairly easy to get a long-term residency. The one thing you have to do? Get a job.  In Belgium, not only will they let you apply for work as an outsider, they’ll then offer you a residency permit after just two weeks of employment. This isn’t a permanent residency permit but it’s certainly a step in the right direction. All you gotta do next is hold onto your job for long enough (it varies by region), and you’ll be laughing all the way to the Belgian citizenship test. The only downside is you need to actually be employable for this plan to work.    Paraguay Nothing could be simpler than getting residency in Paraguay. Probably thanks to its terminal obscurity, the government seems desperate to get as many people into the landlocked South American nation as possible. As a result, there’s only one hard and fast requirement. You need to deposit money in a Paraguayan bank. A small amount won’t do, but you don’t have to go too big. Around 35 times the monthly minimum wage is the accepted sum (between $4,500-$5,500 USD). Of the 6 million or so people who live there, at least half of them probably pretend they’re from Argentina. It’s a poor, underdeveloped country surrounded by bigger, way more developed countries. Still, at least it’s cheap.  Costa Rica Costa Rica has been popular with expats for over 30 years due to its easy-going lifestyle and gorgeous ocean-side landscapes. Actually, water lovers of all kinds will thrive in Costa Rica, as it boasts the second largest number of rivers and water bodies anywhere in the world. As you can imagine, a wide range of native fauna comes along with that, including over 300 species of a hummingbird!  Costa Rica is a wonderful place for retirees, offering a visa program that welcomes older folks with at least $1,000/month in income. For the working set, you will need a job to settle there. Luckily, Costa Rica has a lot of job opportunities, especially around tourism and teaching English.    Canada Like the hippy younger sibling to America’s hard-working grownup, Canada always takes a contrary liberal stance to the USA. That includes on immigration. Canada is casting its arms to open wide to the surrounding world. Luckily, that includes to you, provided you can prove you’re worth having. Canada’s immigration rules depends entirely on how skilled you are.  For those with the skills or education level that Canada needs, there’s an express entry program that’s so swift, it probably amounts to kidnapping. You fill in an online form, which assigns you points for stuff like education level, industries worked in, and whether you are able to speak French. If you hit a high score on these, plus other stuff like whether you studied in Canada or have Canadian relatives, you’re probably in. All you gotta do next is pony up about $500 CAD ($390 in real dollars).  Cambodia Though steeped in a bloody history, Cambodia is now one of the fastest-growing economies in Asia. It is a good choice for people who crave a change from their first-world ideals, as the customs will be very new to most.  For example, people in Cambodia don’t celebrate their birthdays, and lots of adults don’t even know how old they are. Fast food is not very popular, and the preferred method of travel is the moped.  To live in Cambodia, you can get a long-term business visa without needing to be sponsored by a local company. This visa can be renewed indefinitely but doesn’t grant the right to work for a Cambodian company. You will need to apply for a work permit in order to get a job there, but you may find that employers are lax about enforcing that requirement.    Belize An English-speaking nation in Central America, complete with ultra-low cost of living and the sort of beaches. Wedged awkwardly between Mexico and Guatemala, this paradise is barely larger than Wales and comes with a very small population.  You can apply for permanent residency in Belize after only a year there. To stay there for a year, all you have to do is arrive on a 30-day tourist visa, and keep renewing it every 30 days. When you hit the 50-week mark, pay $1,000 and, after jumping through some bureaucratic hoops, you should be in. Just be careful of the requirement some departments have that you leave the country for two weeks every 6 months. Doing so will reset your year-long countdown.    Nicaragua It might be a shock for those who remember 1980s Nicaragua as a place of leftist coups, civil wars, and rightwing Contras, but Nicaragua is gorgeous.  Provided you can ignore the politics, Nicaragua is the place you always wanted to go home to. Nicaragua runs a retirement program, just like Ecuador. And, just like Ecuador, they take their own entry requirements with a pinch of salt. Provided you can prove an income of $600 a month, you neither have to be old nor, technically, retired.   While most countries don’t let those on retirement visas to work, Nicaragua’s government defines work so loosely you kinda wonder why they bother at all. If you open a restaurant or a small hotel, they don’t define it as work. If you get an income working digitally for a non-Nicaraguan company, they don’t define it as work.    Panama Panama, is technically an independent part of Central America, but in reality looking and feeling like a part of Florida that broke off and floated south, Panama is moving abroad for those who don’t want the hassle and inconvenience that moving abroad usually entails. It’s safe, well developed, a lot of people speak English, and it uses the US dollar. Practically anyone can move there with effectively zero effort.  Most Americans that head to Panama do so on the retiree visa, which gives holders massive discounts on a ton of stuff, while only requiring a monthly income of $1,000. But the residency visa for younger workers is almost equally good. Basically, all you gotta do is deposit $5,000 in a Panamanian bank. Then, if you come from one of 47 ‘friendly countries’ (yeah, that includes USA, Canada, UK, New Zealand, Austria, and the EU), you can get the Friendly Nations Visa. All you need is to find a job or open a business in Panama and you’ve got long-term residency. Just beware that a load of people who get this visa is using it as a massive tax dodge.    Mexico Nothing could be easier than getting permanent leave to remain in Mexico. No, really. Just rock up to the airport/border, and ask to buy an FMM visa. Provided you don’t intend to do any work, the FMM visa allows you to remain in Mexico for 6 months. At that point, you can renew it for another 6 months. Then renew it again. And again. And again, and so on until you finally drop dead. How much does this marvelous, life-changing visa cost? The princely sum of $21.  That’s a layout of $42 a year to legally kick back in a country of pristine beaches, world-class cities, gorgeous colonial towns, and mountain scenery like something out of a dream. Sure, you’re probably gonna need an income to go along with that, but fear not! There are roughly a bazillion Mexican temporary residency visas you can cheaply upgrade to, including some designed for artists, sports players, scientists, and retirees.  All of which just leaves one thing to discuss: the drugs. Yeah, Mexico is in quite a grim place at the moment, with the Drug War having killed tens of thousands in the last decade. Whether you think the risk is worth it is up to you; not everywhere is affected, and some towns are essentially drug-violence free. Just maybe make sure not to do any drugs while you’re there, huh?   Seychelles  Seychelles is a group of 115 gorgeous islands in the western Indian Ocean. Almost half of the available landmass in the country is protected in the form of national parks and reserves, but that still leaves plenty of room for expats craving the beach life and lots of cultural diversity.  All you will need upon arrival in Seychelles is a passport. There are no visa requirements for moving there. If after five years of residence you want to make it official, you will be eligible to apply for citizenship – as long as you haven’t gotten into any legal trouble during that time. Cashed up expats can cut their wait time for citizenship to one year if they invest at least $1 million USD.    Sweden  If you are looking for a high quality of life and progressive political culture, Sweden is a great choice It has been called one of the best countries to be a woman and has the most progressive views regarding gender equality. It also offers generous immigration policies, with a refugee and immigrant population of about 15%.   Sweden is not the easiest country on our list to simply drop into for a long-term stay, because you will need a job offer in order to get a work visa.  However, the immigration process is well automated online, and most people can spend a few months in the country visa-free in order to network.          Svalbard (Norway) The archipelago of Svalbard (pop: 2,642) is indeed part of Norway, but in the same way that Puerto Rico is part of the US or Greenland is part of Denmark. A whole lot of important things have been devolved to the Svalbard administration in Longyearbyen, from gun control to environmental issues, to emergency services, and the issuing of marriage certificates. One of the things that have been devolved is immigration, and Svalbard works on a very different system to Norway. There is no visa regime on Svalbard at all. Literally, anyone can move there and settle down without the need for a permit.  The only thing you need to prove is that you have sufficient funds to support yourself after moving there. This is important because Svalbard is cold. Closer to the North Pole than it is to mainland Norway (itself a very cold country), Svalbard is both freezing and utterly remote. It’s over a thousand miles to the mainland, winters take place in permanent darkness, and hungry polar bears prowl the streets. To cut down on polar bear attacks, unemployment and homelessness are literally illegal, and retirees are deported if they’re considered a drain on society. But hey, at least it’s not your home country, right?   Filed under the category of Moving abroad, job abroad, Canada migration, migration, Filipinos,residency
Seychelles
 Seychelles is a group of 115 gorgeous islands in the western Indian Ocean. Almost half of the available landmass in the country is protected in the form of national parks and reserves, but that still leaves plenty of room for expats craving the beach life and lots of cultural diversity.

All you will need upon arrival in Seychelles is a passport. There are no visa requirements for moving there. If after five years of residence you want to make it official, you will be eligible to apply for citizenship – as long as you haven’t gotten into any legal trouble during that time. Cashed up expats can cut their wait time for citizenship to one year if they invest at least $1 million USD.
Moving abroad permanently may not be the easiest thing in the world, it’s also not as hard as many people would think. In some countries, acquiring residency is so easy. Filipinos, in general, seems to have a strong inclination in finding the right country for migration, may it be for finding a better job abroad or to find a country where they would choose to spend the rest of their lives.  Do you know that there are countries where migration is extremely easy?        Ads     Sponsored Links    Ecuador A land of boiling volcanoes, soaring mountain peaks, and old pastel-colored colonial towns, Ecuador is exactly the sort of over-romanticized stereotype of Latin America you’ve always secretly held in your head. It’s got beaches. Islands. Mayan ruins. An adorably underperforming soccer team. It’s got a remarkably low cost of living, and the US dollar as a currency.  This little slice of the south of the border paradise could be your new home for as little as $800 per month. That’s not costs you gotta pay out. That’s all the income you have to prove you have in order to move to Ecuador.  This is, however, is a requirement for Ecuador’s pensioner visa, not for a general one. Ecuador has no minimum age requirements on pensioner visas, and those claiming they don’t need to even prove they have a pension. You’ve just gotta show that $800 will be landing in your bank account every single month for perpetuity and you’re in. This kinda begs the questions as to why they call it a ‘pensioner visa’, but who are we to argue? The low requirement means people with trust funds, compensation pay outs, and royalties are all able to net an easy visa (probably, don’t quote us on that last one).    Austria  Migrating in Austria is not recommended for those who like their homes nice and cheap. The former seat of Habsburg imperial power, Austria is a tiny country that operates a whole lot like a hipster crafts store: small, fascinating to look at, and so expensive.  Yet Austria does have one thing a hipster store doesn’t have. According to The Telegraph, Austria offers over 10 different types of residence permits. The best part? Absolutely none of them require any form of inward investment.  The bad news is that you need to apply for your residence card abroad (i.e. not in Austria). The good news is this doesn’t apply to EU citizens or Americans. If you’re an American, you can just get a D-Visa, giving you up to 6 months’ leave to stay in the country, then go to Austria, secure a job/wife, and then apply for a proper residence visa. Just remember to smile smugly at all those struggling Canadians and Australians as you waltz your way to the front of the immigration line.    Belgium Germany’s go-to country to invade after Poland, tiny Belgium is one of northern Europe’s tiniest states. Slightly smaller than Maryland, it boasts a whole lotta flat and whole lotta roads. On the other hand, it also has some of the most attractive small towns on the continent. It’s also fairly easy to get a long-term residency. The one thing you have to do? Get a job.  In Belgium, not only will they let you apply for work as an outsider, they’ll then offer you a residency permit after just two weeks of employment. This isn’t a permanent residency permit but it’s certainly a step in the right direction. All you gotta do next is hold onto your job for long enough (it varies by region), and you’ll be laughing all the way to the Belgian citizenship test. The only downside is you need to actually be employable for this plan to work.    Paraguay Nothing could be simpler than getting residency in Paraguay. Probably thanks to its terminal obscurity, the government seems desperate to get as many people into the landlocked South American nation as possible. As a result, there’s only one hard and fast requirement. You need to deposit money in a Paraguayan bank. A small amount won’t do, but you don’t have to go too big. Around 35 times the monthly minimum wage is the accepted sum (between $4,500-$5,500 USD). Of the 6 million or so people who live there, at least half of them probably pretend they’re from Argentina. It’s a poor, underdeveloped country surrounded by bigger, way more developed countries. Still, at least it’s cheap.  Costa Rica Costa Rica has been popular with expats for over 30 years due to its easy-going lifestyle and gorgeous ocean-side landscapes. Actually, water lovers of all kinds will thrive in Costa Rica, as it boasts the second largest number of rivers and water bodies anywhere in the world. As you can imagine, a wide range of native fauna comes along with that, including over 300 species of a hummingbird!  Costa Rica is a wonderful place for retirees, offering a visa program that welcomes older folks with at least $1,000/month in income. For the working set, you will need a job to settle there. Luckily, Costa Rica has a lot of job opportunities, especially around tourism and teaching English.    Canada Like the hippy younger sibling to America’s hard-working grownup, Canada always takes a contrary liberal stance to the USA. That includes on immigration. Canada is casting its arms to open wide to the surrounding world. Luckily, that includes to you, provided you can prove you’re worth having. Canada’s immigration rules depends entirely on how skilled you are.  For those with the skills or education level that Canada needs, there’s an express entry program that’s so swift, it probably amounts to kidnapping. You fill in an online form, which assigns you points for stuff like education level, industries worked in, and whether you are able to speak French. If you hit a high score on these, plus other stuff like whether you studied in Canada or have Canadian relatives, you’re probably in. All you gotta do next is pony up about $500 CAD ($390 in real dollars).  Cambodia Though steeped in a bloody history, Cambodia is now one of the fastest-growing economies in Asia. It is a good choice for people who crave a change from their first-world ideals, as the customs will be very new to most.  For example, people in Cambodia don’t celebrate their birthdays, and lots of adults don’t even know how old they are. Fast food is not very popular, and the preferred method of travel is the moped.  To live in Cambodia, you can get a long-term business visa without needing to be sponsored by a local company. This visa can be renewed indefinitely but doesn’t grant the right to work for a Cambodian company. You will need to apply for a work permit in order to get a job there, but you may find that employers are lax about enforcing that requirement.    Belize An English-speaking nation in Central America, complete with ultra-low cost of living and the sort of beaches. Wedged awkwardly between Mexico and Guatemala, this paradise is barely larger than Wales and comes with a very small population.  You can apply for permanent residency in Belize after only a year there. To stay there for a year, all you have to do is arrive on a 30-day tourist visa, and keep renewing it every 30 days. When you hit the 50-week mark, pay $1,000 and, after jumping through some bureaucratic hoops, you should be in. Just be careful of the requirement some departments have that you leave the country for two weeks every 6 months. Doing so will reset your year-long countdown.    Nicaragua It might be a shock for those who remember 1980s Nicaragua as a place of leftist coups, civil wars, and rightwing Contras, but Nicaragua is gorgeous.  Provided you can ignore the politics, Nicaragua is the place you always wanted to go home to. Nicaragua runs a retirement program, just like Ecuador. And, just like Ecuador, they take their own entry requirements with a pinch of salt. Provided you can prove an income of $600 a month, you neither have to be old nor, technically, retired.   While most countries don’t let those on retirement visas to work, Nicaragua’s government defines work so loosely you kinda wonder why they bother at all. If you open a restaurant or a small hotel, they don’t define it as work. If you get an income working digitally for a non-Nicaraguan company, they don’t define it as work.    Panama Panama, is technically an independent part of Central America, but in reality looking and feeling like a part of Florida that broke off and floated south, Panama is moving abroad for those who don’t want the hassle and inconvenience that moving abroad usually entails. It’s safe, well developed, a lot of people speak English, and it uses the US dollar. Practically anyone can move there with effectively zero effort.  Most Americans that head to Panama do so on the retiree visa, which gives holders massive discounts on a ton of stuff, while only requiring a monthly income of $1,000. But the residency visa for younger workers is almost equally good. Basically, all you gotta do is deposit $5,000 in a Panamanian bank. Then, if you come from one of 47 ‘friendly countries’ (yeah, that includes USA, Canada, UK, New Zealand, Austria, and the EU), you can get the Friendly Nations Visa. All you need is to find a job or open a business in Panama and you’ve got long-term residency. Just beware that a load of people who get this visa is using it as a massive tax dodge.    Mexico Nothing could be easier than getting permanent leave to remain in Mexico. No, really. Just rock up to the airport/border, and ask to buy an FMM visa. Provided you don’t intend to do any work, the FMM visa allows you to remain in Mexico for 6 months. At that point, you can renew it for another 6 months. Then renew it again. And again. And again, and so on until you finally drop dead. How much does this marvelous, life-changing visa cost? The princely sum of $21.  That’s a layout of $42 a year to legally kick back in a country of pristine beaches, world-class cities, gorgeous colonial towns, and mountain scenery like something out of a dream. Sure, you’re probably gonna need an income to go along with that, but fear not! There are roughly a bazillion Mexican temporary residency visas you can cheaply upgrade to, including some designed for artists, sports players, scientists, and retirees.  All of which just leaves one thing to discuss: the drugs. Yeah, Mexico is in quite a grim place at the moment, with the Drug War having killed tens of thousands in the last decade. Whether you think the risk is worth it is up to you; not everywhere is affected, and some towns are essentially drug-violence free. Just maybe make sure not to do any drugs while you’re there, huh?   Seychelles  Seychelles is a group of 115 gorgeous islands in the western Indian Ocean. Almost half of the available landmass in the country is protected in the form of national parks and reserves, but that still leaves plenty of room for expats craving the beach life and lots of cultural diversity.  All you will need upon arrival in Seychelles is a passport. There are no visa requirements for moving there. If after five years of residence you want to make it official, you will be eligible to apply for citizenship – as long as you haven’t gotten into any legal trouble during that time. Cashed up expats can cut their wait time for citizenship to one year if they invest at least $1 million USD.    Sweden  If you are looking for a high quality of life and progressive political culture, Sweden is a great choice It has been called one of the best countries to be a woman and has the most progressive views regarding gender equality. It also offers generous immigration policies, with a refugee and immigrant population of about 15%.   Sweden is not the easiest country on our list to simply drop into for a long-term stay, because you will need a job offer in order to get a work visa.  However, the immigration process is well automated online, and most people can spend a few months in the country visa-free in order to network.          Svalbard (Norway) The archipelago of Svalbard (pop: 2,642) is indeed part of Norway, but in the same way that Puerto Rico is part of the US or Greenland is part of Denmark. A whole lot of important things have been devolved to the Svalbard administration in Longyearbyen, from gun control to environmental issues, to emergency services, and the issuing of marriage certificates. One of the things that have been devolved is immigration, and Svalbard works on a very different system to Norway. There is no visa regime on Svalbard at all. Literally, anyone can move there and settle down without the need for a permit.  The only thing you need to prove is that you have sufficient funds to support yourself after moving there. This is important because Svalbard is cold. Closer to the North Pole than it is to mainland Norway (itself a very cold country), Svalbard is both freezing and utterly remote. It’s over a thousand miles to the mainland, winters take place in permanent darkness, and hungry polar bears prowl the streets. To cut down on polar bear attacks, unemployment and homelessness are literally illegal, and retirees are deported if they’re considered a drain on society. But hey, at least it’s not your home country, right?   Filed under the category of Moving abroad, job abroad, Canada migration, migration, Filipinos,residency
Sweden
 If you are looking for a high quality of life and progressive political culture, 
Sweden is a great choice It has been called one of the best countries to be a woman and has the most progressive views regarding gender equality. It also offers generous immigration policies, with a refugee and immigrant population of about 15%.

Sweden is not the easiest country on our list to simply drop into for a long-term stay, because you will need a job offer in order to get a work visa.

However, the immigration process is well automated online, and most people can spend a few months in the country visa-free in order to network.


Moving abroad permanently may not be the easiest thing in the world, it’s also not as hard as many people would think. In some countries, acquiring residency is so easy. Filipinos, in general, seems to have a strong inclination in finding the right country for migration, may it be for finding a better job abroad or to find a country where they would choose to spend the rest of their lives.  Do you know that there are countries where migration is extremely easy?        Ads     Sponsored Links    Ecuador A land of boiling volcanoes, soaring mountain peaks, and old pastel-colored colonial towns, Ecuador is exactly the sort of over-romanticized stereotype of Latin America you’ve always secretly held in your head. It’s got beaches. Islands. Mayan ruins. An adorably underperforming soccer team. It’s got a remarkably low cost of living, and the US dollar as a currency.  This little slice of the south of the border paradise could be your new home for as little as $800 per month. That’s not costs you gotta pay out. That’s all the income you have to prove you have in order to move to Ecuador.  This is, however, is a requirement for Ecuador’s pensioner visa, not for a general one. Ecuador has no minimum age requirements on pensioner visas, and those claiming they don’t need to even prove they have a pension. You’ve just gotta show that $800 will be landing in your bank account every single month for perpetuity and you’re in. This kinda begs the questions as to why they call it a ‘pensioner visa’, but who are we to argue? The low requirement means people with trust funds, compensation pay outs, and royalties are all able to net an easy visa (probably, don’t quote us on that last one).    Austria  Migrating in Austria is not recommended for those who like their homes nice and cheap. The former seat of Habsburg imperial power, Austria is a tiny country that operates a whole lot like a hipster crafts store: small, fascinating to look at, and so expensive.  Yet Austria does have one thing a hipster store doesn’t have. According to The Telegraph, Austria offers over 10 different types of residence permits. The best part? Absolutely none of them require any form of inward investment.  The bad news is that you need to apply for your residence card abroad (i.e. not in Austria). The good news is this doesn’t apply to EU citizens or Americans. If you’re an American, you can just get a D-Visa, giving you up to 6 months’ leave to stay in the country, then go to Austria, secure a job/wife, and then apply for a proper residence visa. Just remember to smile smugly at all those struggling Canadians and Australians as you waltz your way to the front of the immigration line.    Belgium Germany’s go-to country to invade after Poland, tiny Belgium is one of northern Europe’s tiniest states. Slightly smaller than Maryland, it boasts a whole lotta flat and whole lotta roads. On the other hand, it also has some of the most attractive small towns on the continent. It’s also fairly easy to get a long-term residency. The one thing you have to do? Get a job.  In Belgium, not only will they let you apply for work as an outsider, they’ll then offer you a residency permit after just two weeks of employment. This isn’t a permanent residency permit but it’s certainly a step in the right direction. All you gotta do next is hold onto your job for long enough (it varies by region), and you’ll be laughing all the way to the Belgian citizenship test. The only downside is you need to actually be employable for this plan to work.    Paraguay Nothing could be simpler than getting residency in Paraguay. Probably thanks to its terminal obscurity, the government seems desperate to get as many people into the landlocked South American nation as possible. As a result, there’s only one hard and fast requirement. You need to deposit money in a Paraguayan bank. A small amount won’t do, but you don’t have to go too big. Around 35 times the monthly minimum wage is the accepted sum (between $4,500-$5,500 USD). Of the 6 million or so people who live there, at least half of them probably pretend they’re from Argentina. It’s a poor, underdeveloped country surrounded by bigger, way more developed countries. Still, at least it’s cheap.  Costa Rica Costa Rica has been popular with expats for over 30 years due to its easy-going lifestyle and gorgeous ocean-side landscapes. Actually, water lovers of all kinds will thrive in Costa Rica, as it boasts the second largest number of rivers and water bodies anywhere in the world. As you can imagine, a wide range of native fauna comes along with that, including over 300 species of a hummingbird!  Costa Rica is a wonderful place for retirees, offering a visa program that welcomes older folks with at least $1,000/month in income. For the working set, you will need a job to settle there. Luckily, Costa Rica has a lot of job opportunities, especially around tourism and teaching English.    Canada Like the hippy younger sibling to America’s hard-working grownup, Canada always takes a contrary liberal stance to the USA. That includes on immigration. Canada is casting its arms to open wide to the surrounding world. Luckily, that includes to you, provided you can prove you’re worth having. Canada’s immigration rules depends entirely on how skilled you are.  For those with the skills or education level that Canada needs, there’s an express entry program that’s so swift, it probably amounts to kidnapping. You fill in an online form, which assigns you points for stuff like education level, industries worked in, and whether you are able to speak French. If you hit a high score on these, plus other stuff like whether you studied in Canada or have Canadian relatives, you’re probably in. All you gotta do next is pony up about $500 CAD ($390 in real dollars).  Cambodia Though steeped in a bloody history, Cambodia is now one of the fastest-growing economies in Asia. It is a good choice for people who crave a change from their first-world ideals, as the customs will be very new to most.  For example, people in Cambodia don’t celebrate their birthdays, and lots of adults don’t even know how old they are. Fast food is not very popular, and the preferred method of travel is the moped.  To live in Cambodia, you can get a long-term business visa without needing to be sponsored by a local company. This visa can be renewed indefinitely but doesn’t grant the right to work for a Cambodian company. You will need to apply for a work permit in order to get a job there, but you may find that employers are lax about enforcing that requirement.    Belize An English-speaking nation in Central America, complete with ultra-low cost of living and the sort of beaches. Wedged awkwardly between Mexico and Guatemala, this paradise is barely larger than Wales and comes with a very small population.  You can apply for permanent residency in Belize after only a year there. To stay there for a year, all you have to do is arrive on a 30-day tourist visa, and keep renewing it every 30 days. When you hit the 50-week mark, pay $1,000 and, after jumping through some bureaucratic hoops, you should be in. Just be careful of the requirement some departments have that you leave the country for two weeks every 6 months. Doing so will reset your year-long countdown.    Nicaragua It might be a shock for those who remember 1980s Nicaragua as a place of leftist coups, civil wars, and rightwing Contras, but Nicaragua is gorgeous.  Provided you can ignore the politics, Nicaragua is the place you always wanted to go home to. Nicaragua runs a retirement program, just like Ecuador. And, just like Ecuador, they take their own entry requirements with a pinch of salt. Provided you can prove an income of $600 a month, you neither have to be old nor, technically, retired.   While most countries don’t let those on retirement visas to work, Nicaragua’s government defines work so loosely you kinda wonder why they bother at all. If you open a restaurant or a small hotel, they don’t define it as work. If you get an income working digitally for a non-Nicaraguan company, they don’t define it as work.    Panama Panama, is technically an independent part of Central America, but in reality looking and feeling like a part of Florida that broke off and floated south, Panama is moving abroad for those who don’t want the hassle and inconvenience that moving abroad usually entails. It’s safe, well developed, a lot of people speak English, and it uses the US dollar. Practically anyone can move there with effectively zero effort.  Most Americans that head to Panama do so on the retiree visa, which gives holders massive discounts on a ton of stuff, while only requiring a monthly income of $1,000. But the residency visa for younger workers is almost equally good. Basically, all you gotta do is deposit $5,000 in a Panamanian bank. Then, if you come from one of 47 ‘friendly countries’ (yeah, that includes USA, Canada, UK, New Zealand, Austria, and the EU), you can get the Friendly Nations Visa. All you need is to find a job or open a business in Panama and you’ve got long-term residency. Just beware that a load of people who get this visa is using it as a massive tax dodge.    Mexico Nothing could be easier than getting permanent leave to remain in Mexico. No, really. Just rock up to the airport/border, and ask to buy an FMM visa. Provided you don’t intend to do any work, the FMM visa allows you to remain in Mexico for 6 months. At that point, you can renew it for another 6 months. Then renew it again. And again. And again, and so on until you finally drop dead. How much does this marvelous, life-changing visa cost? The princely sum of $21.  That’s a layout of $42 a year to legally kick back in a country of pristine beaches, world-class cities, gorgeous colonial towns, and mountain scenery like something out of a dream. Sure, you’re probably gonna need an income to go along with that, but fear not! There are roughly a bazillion Mexican temporary residency visas you can cheaply upgrade to, including some designed for artists, sports players, scientists, and retirees.  All of which just leaves one thing to discuss: the drugs. Yeah, Mexico is in quite a grim place at the moment, with the Drug War having killed tens of thousands in the last decade. Whether you think the risk is worth it is up to you; not everywhere is affected, and some towns are essentially drug-violence free. Just maybe make sure not to do any drugs while you’re there, huh?   Seychelles  Seychelles is a group of 115 gorgeous islands in the western Indian Ocean. Almost half of the available landmass in the country is protected in the form of national parks and reserves, but that still leaves plenty of room for expats craving the beach life and lots of cultural diversity.  All you will need upon arrival in Seychelles is a passport. There are no visa requirements for moving there. If after five years of residence you want to make it official, you will be eligible to apply for citizenship – as long as you haven’t gotten into any legal trouble during that time. Cashed up expats can cut their wait time for citizenship to one year if they invest at least $1 million USD.    Sweden  If you are looking for a high quality of life and progressive political culture, Sweden is a great choice It has been called one of the best countries to be a woman and has the most progressive views regarding gender equality. It also offers generous immigration policies, with a refugee and immigrant population of about 15%.   Sweden is not the easiest country on our list to simply drop into for a long-term stay, because you will need a job offer in order to get a work visa.  However, the immigration process is well automated online, and most people can spend a few months in the country visa-free in order to network.          Svalbard (Norway) The archipelago of Svalbard (pop: 2,642) is indeed part of Norway, but in the same way that Puerto Rico is part of the US or Greenland is part of Denmark. A whole lot of important things have been devolved to the Svalbard administration in Longyearbyen, from gun control to environmental issues, to emergency services, and the issuing of marriage certificates. One of the things that have been devolved is immigration, and Svalbard works on a very different system to Norway. There is no visa regime on Svalbard at all. Literally, anyone can move there and settle down without the need for a permit.  The only thing you need to prove is that you have sufficient funds to support yourself after moving there. This is important because Svalbard is cold. Closer to the North Pole than it is to mainland Norway (itself a very cold country), Svalbard is both freezing and utterly remote. It’s over a thousand miles to the mainland, winters take place in permanent darkness, and hungry polar bears prowl the streets. To cut down on polar bear attacks, unemployment and homelessness are literally illegal, and retirees are deported if they’re considered a drain on society. But hey, at least it’s not your home country, right?   Filed under the category of Moving abroad, job abroad, Canada migration, migration, Filipinos,residency

Svalbard (Norway)
The archipelago of Svalbard (pop: 2,642) is indeed part of Norway, but in the same way that Puerto Rico is part of the US or Greenland is part of Denmark. A whole lot of important things have been devolved to the Svalbard administration in Longyearbyen, from gun control to environmental issues, to emergency services, and the issuing of marriage certificates. One of the things that have been devolved is immigration, and Svalbard works on a very different system to Norway. There is no visa regime on Svalbard at all. Literally, anyone can move there and settle down without the need for a permit.

The only thing you need to prove is that you have sufficient funds to support yourself after moving there. This is important because Svalbard is cold. Closer to the North Pole than it is to mainland Norway (itself a very cold country), Svalbard is both freezing and utterly remote. It’s over a thousand miles to the mainland, winters take place in permanent darkness, and hungry polar bears prowl the streets. To cut down on polar bear attacks, unemployment and homelessness are literally illegal, and retirees are deported if they’re considered a drain on society. But hey, at least it’s not your home country, righ
t?
Filed under the category of Moving abroad, job abroad, Canada migration, migration, Filipinos,residency
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The overseas Filipino workers (OFW) helps the economy by the remittances they send to their family which is spent on their daily needs making local commerce move. In spite of the help they give to the economy, OFWs are often vulnerable to abuse and maltreatment abroad especially those who are deployed as household service workers (HSW). Due to lack or very little knowledge about their rights, many OFWs needs equipping and protection.  Recently, two pro-OFW bills were already approved in the House Of Representatives: HB 8110 and HB 1700 which aims to empower and protect the OFWs.     Ads      Sponsored Links      The House of Representatives has approved on second reading two measures aimed at empowering and protecting overseas Filipino workers (OFWs).  In a statement by Bagong Henerasyon Party-list Rep. Bernadette Herrera-Dy, she said that the Congress approved House Bill (HB) No. 8110, which proposes a standard handbook on the rights and responsibilities of OFWs, and House Bill 1700, granting OFWs the right to equal protection on money claims.  Under HB 8110, the Philippine Overseas Employment Administration (POEA) is mandated to develop, publish, disseminate, and update a handbook on the rights and responsibilities of migrant workers.  They shall also be the lead agency in implementing an intensified program against illegal recruitment activities.  The bill also provides that the handbook shall be written in words that can be easily understood, with translation in the local language as may be necessary.  On the other hand, HB 1700 is seeking to amend Republic Act No. 8042, or the “Migrant Workers and Filipino Migrants Act of 1995”, by removing the clause "or for three months for every year of the unexpired term whichever is less" found on the fifth paragraph of Section 10 of the law which refers to money claims for the unexpired portion of a migrant worker's contract.  Under the measure, a worker shall be entitled to the full reimbursement of his placement fee and deduction made with interest at 12% per annum in case of termination of overseas employment without just, valid or authorized cause as defined by law or contract, or any unauthorized deduction from the migrant worker’s salary.  Filed under the category of overseas Filipino workers, remittances, economy, abuse, maltreatment, household service workers, HB 8110, HB 1700, House Of Representatives, OFW, HSW

Natural remedies have long been used in the Arab world to treat a range of health issues, including these seeds and herbs that are thought to have various benefits. Unlike synthetic drugs that could damage your liver in the long run, herbal medicines can cure illnesses without damaging your internal organs.        Ads    </  Sponsored Links      Black cumin seed According to Islamic tradition, the black cumin seed is a powerhouse of health benefits. It is thought to help with immune-related, digestive and respiratory issues and has antihistamine, anti-inflammatory, and anti-oxidant properties.  Cloves Cloves and clove oil have been used in dentistry since as early as the 19th century. It is known to contain antiseptic and anti-inflammatory chemical eugenol.  Turmeric Turmeric contains the chemical curcumin that is thought to decrease inflammation in the body.  Thyme Thyme has been used for centuries to treat such medical conditions as diarrhea, stomach ache, arthritis and sore throats due to the presence of thymol, an antiseptic agent.  Fennel seeds A concentrated source of minerals like copper, potassium, calcium, zinc, manganese, vitamin c, iron, selenium and magnesium, fennel is thought to do everything like regulating blood pressure and easing water retention as it’s a known diuretic.  Anise Anise oil contains thymol, terpineol, and anethole, which are known remedies for a cough and flu cases. Anise is also known to help improve digestion, alleviate cramps and reduce nausea.   Filed under the category of Natural remedies, Arab, health issues, seeds and herbs, synthetic drugs, herbal medicines, a cure.
Many Filipinos especially those in the remote areas of the country.   They can only avail of medical attention once in a blue moon through medical missions coming from non-government organizations (NGO's) and other health advocacy groups. Instances also happen where citizens, even at the heart of the city suffer illnesses and just succumb to their deaths without having treated due to expensive medications and hospitalization. Soon, all Filipinos will have access to free health services including the families of the overseas Filipino workers (OFW).   This situation is about to change as the new universal health bill was already approved and soon to be enacted as a law. The Senate passed on third and final reading a bill that seeks to provide adequate health care services to Filipinos. The senators unanimously voted for the approval of Senate Bill #1986 also known as the "Universal Health Care Bill."   President Rodrigo Duterte wanted it to be certified urgent and called for the proposed measure's passage at the Senate.       Ads     Sponsored Links     With this law being enacted, Filipinos will be given health care coverage and benefits under the National Health Security Program, which replaces the National Health Insurance Program or Philhealth.  Under the universal health care law, "contributors" or those who have the capacity to pay will have to pay for their premiums while the government will shoulder the contributions of non-contributors. Funds for the subsidy will be included in the annual General Appropriations Act as well as sin taxes from cigarettes will also be a major source of funding for the policy.  Presidential Spokesperson Harry Roque, who authored the bill when he was still a party-list representative, thanked the Senate for passing what he considers to be a "groundbreaking" law.  The House of Representative had previously passed a version of the bill (House Bill No 5784) in September 2017.     The President's move in certifying the bill as urgent shows the administration's "unrelenting commitment to provide the marginalized and disadvantaged with sufficient and better health care services," Roque said.  Filed under the category of Filipinos, non-government organizations (NGO's), health advocacy groups,  free health services,  universal health bill, Senate, Universal Health Care Bill,  President Rodrigo Duterte

As overseas Filipino workers (OFW) working in an unfamiliar territory, we feel comfortable whenever we see a compatriot or a fellow Filipino abroad. In some instances, very unfortunate things happen like getting into a trouble because of a fellow Filipino. The Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA) and the Consulate General in Saudi Arabia confirmed that an OFW was stabbed and killed by a fellow OFW in Jeddah, KSA.      Ads     Sponsored Links    A Filipino was stabbed and killed by a fellow Filipino in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, according to the confirmation of the Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA).  The victim (name withheld) was a 29-year-old from Datu Odin Sinsuat, Maguindanao, who worked as a family driver in Jeddah.   The suspect (name withheld), a 34-year-old from Capiz, also a driver for the same family  The suspect remains under police custody after he was arrested immediately after the incident. The two "allegedly engaged in a fistfight in front of the house of their employer that ended in the victim getting fatally stabbed by his fellow driver." The motive of the stabbing is still unknown.  The Consulate General and the Philippine Overseas Labor Office in Jeddah will extend full assistance to both Filipinos as well as their families.    The victim is set for a vacation to the Philippines soon but the incident turned out to be unfortunate that he will come home inside a box.  Consul General Edgar Badajos said that the suspect is facing a death sentence as per Saudi Sharia law. However, since they are both Filipinos, it is possible that the victim's family could instead  He assured that they will render assistance to help both OFWs.    Filed under the category of overseas Filipino workers, Filipino abroad, Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA), Saudi Arabia,   stabbed, Jeddah, KSA
Two Bills For OFWS: HB 8110 And HB 1700 Now Approved In Congress
More often, families with overseas Filipino workers (OFW) rely on their OFW breadwinner in providing their needs and without doing any efforts to have extra income. They use the money they receive to pay their bills, rents, mortgages, etc. They tend to spend the remittances they receive and wait for the next remittance when the money is over without any savings. This is the reason why no matter how long the OFWs exhaust themselves working overseas, they are still coming home broke and without any savings.  Encouraging our spouse or anyone who is responsible for the remittances you send to save could be a great help and could guarantee a hassle-free retirement, much more if they placed this savings to a profitable investment.      Ads     Sponsored Links    Stick to a budget schedule  Convince your spouse to make a monthly budget and commit to saving a portion of the monthly remittance. They could also spend the remaining part of the budget after setting aside the savings.  No matter how small the savings, it could mean a lot after a period of time you regularly do it.    Use the credit card wisely or do not use it at all  Credit cards could be an advantage when purchasing but it can also lure the holder to spend more. Whenever possible, avoid using credit cards and use cash instead. It would save you from paying extra charges and interests which can really raise your spending.    The best rule should be, do not spend the money you do not have.     Always make a list of important things to buy  Many OFW spouses tend to go on a shopping spree just after receiving the remittance and let their impulses lead in which items they like to buy at the very moment without putting their priorities on the things they really needed.  Encourage them to develop a habit and discipline of making a list of the things they need to prioritize during shopping and strictly follow what is on the list to avoid spending too much on the things that are not really important.    Live a lifestyle that suits your income  Many OFW spouses live like one day millionaire. after claiming the remittances you sent, they will go straight to the mall, eat at the fast-food chain of their choice, go on a shopping spree buying what they want without even thinking if they still have the money to go through the month until the next remittance. If their budget got short, they would borrow money from someone which would cause the next budget to bear the shortage and the cycle goes on.    There's nothing wrong with being generous but not too much  Advise your spouse to exercise caution when giving help to extended families, relatives or friends. There is nothing wrong with extending help but there has to be a limitation. This would avoid them to become dependent on your assistance that they would knock your everytime they need financial help.    Working overseas is not forever and you will eventually come home for good. It is you and your spouse who need to work hand-in-hand to succeed. Together you must find ways to take care of your finances and save for the future of your family.  Filed under the category of overseas Filipino workers, extra income,  bills, rents, mortgages, remittances, working overseas, retirement, investment, savings
More often, families with overseas Filipino workers (OFW) rely on their OFW breadwinner in providing their needs and without doing any efforts to have extra income. They use the money they receive to pay their bills, rents, mortgages, etc. They tend to spend the remittances they receive and wait for the next remittance when the money is over without any savings. This is the reason why no matter how long the OFWs exhaust themselves working overseas, they are still coming home broke and without any savings.  Encouraging our spouse or anyone who is responsible for the remittances you send to save could be a great help and could guarantee a hassle-free retirement, much more if they placed this savings to a profitable investment.      Ads     Sponsored Links    Stick to a budget schedule  Convince your spouse to make a monthly budget and commit to saving a portion of the monthly remittance. They could also spend the remaining part of the budget after setting aside the savings.  No matter how small the savings, it could mean a lot after a period of time you regularly do it.    Use the credit card wisely or do not use it at all  Credit cards could be an advantage when purchasing but it can also lure the holder to spend more. Whenever possible, avoid using credit cards and use cash instead. It would save you from paying extra charges and interests which can really raise your spending.    The best rule should be, do not spend the money you do not have.     Always make a list of important things to buy  Many OFW spouses tend to go on a shopping spree just after receiving the remittance and let their impulses lead in which items they like to buy at the very moment without putting their priorities on the things they really needed.  Encourage them to develop a habit and discipline of making a list of the things they need to prioritize during shopping and strictly follow what is on the list to avoid spending too much on the things that are not really important.    Live a lifestyle that suits your income  Many OFW spouses live like one day millionaire. after claiming the remittances you sent, they will go straight to the mall, eat at the fast-food chain of their choice, go on a shopping spree buying what they want without even thinking if they still have the money to go through the month until the next remittance. If their budget got short, they would borrow money from someone which would cause the next budget to bear the shortage and the cycle goes on.    There's nothing wrong with being generous but not too much  Advise your spouse to exercise caution when giving help to extended families, relatives or friends. There is nothing wrong with extending help but there has to be a limitation. This would avoid them to become dependent on your assistance that they would knock your everytime they need financial help.    Working overseas is not forever and you will eventually come home for good. It is you and your spouse who need to work hand-in-hand to succeed. Together you must find ways to take care of your finances and save for the future of your family.  Filed under the category of overseas Filipino workers, extra income,  bills, rents, mortgages, remittances, working overseas, retirement, investment, savings