Send money to the Philippines Online!

Send money to the Philippines Online!
Remit.com.au makes sending funds to friends and family in the Philippines as easy

Carousel

Sponsored Links
SEARCH THIS SITE
JBSOLIS is a site for overseas Filipino workers, health and insurances, OWWA, PAG-IBIG, bank and cash loans, foreclosed properties, small house designs, local and overseas job listings.
Advertisement

Thursday, May 09, 2019

Red Ribbon No Longer Required To These Countries Starting May 14

The Department of Foreign Affairs said they will no longer issue Authentication Certificates for documents issued by the Philippine government that will be submitted to or have originated from 150 countries starting Tuesday, May 14

This is made possible because the Philippines signed the Hague Apostille Convention, an international law that entitles the Philippine to simplify procedures in the use of public documents abroad or from abroad here in the Philippines.

The Department of Foreign Affairs said they will no longer issue Authentication Certificates for documents issued by the Philippine government that will be submitted to or have originated from 150 countries starting Tuesday, May 14  This is made possible because the Philippines signed the Hague Apostille Convention, an international law that entitles the Philippine to simplify procedures in the use of public documents abroad or from abroad here in the Philippines.      Ads    The Department of Foreign Affairs said they will no longer issue Authentication Certificates for documents issued by the Philippine government that will be submitted to or have originated from 150 countries starting Tuesday, May 14  This is made possible because the Philippines signed the Hague Apostille Convention, an international law that entitles the Philippine to simplify procedures in the use of public documents abroad or from abroad here in the Philippines.  Filipinos used to undergo a lengthy process of authenticating public documents like birth certificates, marriage certificates, death certificates, university diplomas, and professional licensure certificates required for employment or immigration.    The DFA advisory reads: PUBLIC ADVISORY: APOSTILLE CONVENTION ON AUTHENTICATION OF DOCUMENTS TAKES EFFECT IN PH ON 14 MAY 2019 Public Advisory: Apostille Convention on Authentication of Documents Takes Effect in PH on 14 May 2019  07 May 2019 — The Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA)—Office of Consular Affairs wishes to inform the public that it will no longer issue Authentication Certificates from 14 May 2019. Instead, the DFA will affix an Apostille to documents for use abroad as proof of authentication for use in Apostille-contracting parties.  After authentication by the DFA, there is no more need for authentication (legalization) by the concerned Foreign Embassies or Consulates General if the country or territory of destination of the authenticated document is already a member of the Apostille Convention.  Public documents executed in Apostille-contracting countries and territories (except for Austria, Finland, Germany, and Greece) to be used in the Philippines no longer have to be authenticated by the Philippine Embassy or Consulate General once Apostillized.  However, in countries and territories which are not Apostille-contracting parties, the previous process of authentication applies.  Documents still have to be authenticated by the Philippine Embassy or Consulate General before they can be used in the Philippines.  Also, there is still a need for authentication (legalization) by the concerned Foreign Embassies or Consulates General if the country of destination of the authenticated document is not yet a member of the Apostille Convention.  Authentication fees will remain at PhP100 (regular processing) and PhP200 (expedited processing) per document.   For the updated list of Apostille-contracting parties, please visit this link.   Ads  The following countries no longer require authentication of documents.   Contracting Party S 1 R/A/S2 Type3 EIF4 EXT5 Auth6 Res/D/N/DC7 Albania  3-IX-2003 A 9-V-2004  1  Andorra  15-IV-1996 A 31-XII-1996  1  Antigua and Barbuda  1-V-1985 Su 1-XI-1981  1  Argentina  8-V-1987 A 18-II-1988  1 D Armenia  19-XI-1993 A 14-VIII-1994  1  Australia  11-VII-1994 A 16-III-1995  1 D Austria 5-X-1961 14-XI-1967 R 13-I-1968  1 D Azerbaijan  13-V-2004 A** 2-III-2005  1  Bahamas  30-IV-1976 Su 10-VII-1973  1  Bahrain  10-IV-2013 A 31-XII-2013  1 D Barbados  11-VIII-1995 Su 30-XI-1966  1  Belarus  16-VI-1992 Su 31-V-1992  1  Belgium 10-III-1970 11-XII-1975 R 9-II-1976  1  Belize  17-VII-1992 A 11-IV-1993  1  Bolivia  6-IX-2017 A 7-V-2018  1  Bosnia and Herzegovina  23-VIII-1993 Su 6-III-1992  1 D Botswana  16-IX-1968 Su 30-IX-1966  1  Brazil  2-XII-2015 A 14-VIII-2016  1 D Brunei Darussalam  23-II-1987 A 3-XII-1987  1  Bulgaria  1-VIII-2000 A 29-IV-2001  1  Burundi  10-VI-2014 A** 13-II-2015  1  Cabo Verde  7-V-2009 A 13-II-2010  1  Chile  16-XII-2015 A 30-VIII-2016  1  China, People's Republic of   C   2 D,N Colombia  27-IV-2000 A 30-I-2001  1 D Cook Islands  13-VII-2004 A 30-IV-2005  1  Costa Rica  6-IV-2011 A 14-XII-2011  1  Croatia  23-IV-1993 Su 8-X-1991  1  Cyprus  26-VII-1972 A 30-IV-1973  1  Czech Republic  23-VI-1998 A 16-III-1999  1  Denmark 20-X-2006 30-X-2006 R 29-XII-2006  1 D Dominica  22-X-2002 Su 3-XI-1978  1  Dominican Republic  12-XII-2008 A** 30-VIII-2009  1  Ecuador  2-VII-2004 A 2-IV-2005  1 D El Salvador  14-IX-1995 A 31-V-1996  1  Estonia  11-XII-2000 A 30-IX-2001  1 D Eswatini (formerly Swaziland)  3-VII-1978 Su 6-IX-1968  1  Fiji  29-III-1971 Su 10-X-1970  1  Finland 13-III-1962 27-VI-1985 R 26-VIII-1985  1 D France 9-X-1961 25-XI-1964 R 24-I-1965  1 D Georgia  21-VIII-2006 A 14-V-2007  1 D Germany 5-X-1961 15-XII-1965 R 13-II-1966  1 D,N Greece 5-X-1961 19-III-1985 R 18-V-1985  1  Grenada  17-VII-2001 A 7-IV-2002  1  Guatemala  19-I-2017 A 18-IX-2017  1 D Guyana  30-VII-2018 A 18-IV-2019  1  Honduras  20-I-2004 A 30-IX-2004  1  Hungary  18-IV-1972 A 18-I-1973  1 D Iceland 7-IX-2004 28-IX-2004 R 27-XI-2004  1  India  26-X-2004 A** 14-VII-2005  1  Ireland 29-X-1996 8-I-1999 R 9-III-1999  1  Israel  11-XI-1977 A 14-VIII-1978  1  Italy 15-XII-1961 13-XII-1977 R 11-II-1978  1  Japan 12-III-1970 28-V-1970 R 27-VII-1970  1  Kazakhstan  5-IV-2000 A 30-I-2001  1 D Korea, Republic of  25-X-2006 A 14-VII-2007  1  Kosovo  6-XI-2015 A** 14-VII-2016  1 D,DC Kyrgyzstan  15-XI-2010 A** 31-VII-2011  1  Latvia  11-V-1995 A 30-I-1996  1 D Lesotho  24-IV-1972 Su 4-X-1966  1  Liberia  24-V-1995 A** 8-II-1996  1  Liechtenstein 18-IV-1962 19-VII-1972 R 17-IX-1972  1  Lithuania  5-XI-1996 A 19-VII-1997  1  Luxembourg 5-X-1961 4-IV-1979 R 3-VI-1979  1  Malawi  24-II-1967 A 2-XII-1967  1  Malta  12-VI-1967 A 3-III-1968  1  Marshall Islands  18-XI-1991 A 14-VIII-1992  1  Mauritius  20-XII-1968 Su 12-III-1968  1  Mexico  1-XII-1994 A 14-VIII-1995  1  Monaco  24-IV-2002 A 31-XII-2002  1  Mongolia  2-IV-2009 A** 31-XII-2009  1  Montenegro  30-I-2007 Su 3-VI-2006  1  Morocco  27-XI-2015 A** 14-VIII-2016  1  Namibia  25-IV-2000 A 30-I-2001  1  Netherlands 30-XI-1962 9-VIII-1965 R 8-X-1965 4 1 D New Zealand  7-II-2001 A 22-XI-2001  1 D Nicaragua  7-IX-2012 A 14-V-2013  1  Niue  10-VI-1998 A 2-III-1999  1  Norway 30-V-1983 30-V-1983 R 29-VII-1983  1  Oman  12-V-2011 A 30-I-2012  1  Panama  30-X-1990 A 4-VIII-1991  1  Paraguay  10-XII-2013 A** 30-VIII-2014  1  Peru  13-I-2010 A** 30-IX-2010  1  Philippines  12-IX-2018 A** 14-V-2019  1 D Poland  19-XI-2004 A 14-VIII-2005  1  Portugal 20-VIII-1965 6-XII-1968 R 4-II-1969  1 D Republic of Moldova  19-VI-2006 A** 16-III-2007  1  Republic of North Macedonia  20-IX-1993 Su 17-XI-1991  1  Romania  7-VI-2000 A 16-III-2001  1 D Russian Federation  4-IX-1991 Su 31-V-1992  1 D,N Saint Kitts and Nevis  26-II-1994 A 14-XII-1994  1  Saint Lucia  5-XII-2001 A 31-VII-2002  1  Saint Vincent and the Grenadines  2-V-2002 Su 27-X-1979  1  Samoa  18-I-1999 A 13-IX-1999  1  San Marino  26-V-1994 A 13-II-1995  1  Sao Tome and Principe  19-XII-2007 A 13-IX-2008  1  Serbia  26-IV-2001 Su 27-IV-1992  1 D Seychelles  9-VI-1978 A 31-III-1979  1  Slovakia  6-VI-2001 A 18-II-2002  1  Slovenia  8-VI-1992 Su 25-VI-1991  1  South Africa  3-VIII-1994 A 30-IV-1995  1  Spain 21-X-1976 27-VII-1978 R 25-IX-1978  1 D Suriname  29-X-1976 Su 25-XI-1975  1  Sweden 2-III-1999 2-III-1999 R 1-V-1999  1  Switzerland 5-X-1961 10-I-1973 R 11-III-1973  1 D Tajikistan  20-II-2015 A** 31-X-2015  1  Tonga  28-X-1971 Su 4-VI-1970  1 D Trinidad and Tobago  28-X-1999 A 14-VII-2000  1  Tunisia  10-VII-2017 A** 30-III-2018  1  Turkey 8-V-1962 31-VII-1985 R 29-IX-1985  1  Ukraine  2-IV-2003 A 22-XII-2003  1 D United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland 19-X-1961 21-VIII-1964 R 24-I-1965 13 1 D United States of America  24-XII-1980 A 15-X-1981  1 D Uruguay  9-II-2012 A 14-X-2012  1  Uzbekistan  25-VII-2011 A** 15-IV-2012  1  Vanuatu  1-VIII-2008 Su 30-VII-1980  1  Venezuela  Sponsored Links    For those in the Philippines, the usual process is that after getting an original or certified true copy, they need to apply the document for authentication or popularly known as the “red ribbon” at the DFA, and then submit it to the concerned foreign embassy or consulate where they are going to. For Filipinos outside the country, a public document issued by the foreign government needs authentication by the foreign ministry and then by the Philippine embassy or nearest consulate.  Starting May 14, this two-step authentication process is now cut to one step only — with the DFA only affix an Apostille to document being submitted. It also applies to Filipinos in countries which signed the Apostille Convention  Top destination countries for OFWs which are also members of the Apostille Convention include the United States,  However, for Filipinos in countries which are not members of the Apostille Convention like the UAE, red ribbons and foreign embassy authentication are still required.  Authentication fees will remain at P100 for regular processing and P200 for expedited processing per document.

Ads


The Department of Foreign Affairs said they will no longer issue Authentication Certificates for documents issued by the Philippine government that will be submitted to or have originated from 150 countries starting Tuesday, May 14

This is made possible because the Philippines signed the Hague Apostille Convention, an international law that entitles the Philippine to simplify procedures in the use of public documents abroad or from abroad here in the Philippines.

Filipinos used to undergo a lengthy process of authenticating public documents like birth certificates, marriage certificates, death certificates, university diplomas, and professional licensure certificates required for employment or immigration.
The Department of Foreign Affairs said they will no longer issue Authentication Certificates for documents issued by the Philippine government that will be submitted to or have originated from 150 countries starting Tuesday, May 14  This is made possible because the Philippines signed the Hague Apostille Convention, an international law that entitles the Philippine to simplify procedures in the use of public documents abroad or from abroad here in the Philippines.      Ads    The Department of Foreign Affairs said they will no longer issue Authentication Certificates for documents issued by the Philippine government that will be submitted to or have originated from 150 countries starting Tuesday, May 14  This is made possible because the Philippines signed the Hague Apostille Convention, an international law that entitles the Philippine to simplify procedures in the use of public documents abroad or from abroad here in the Philippines.  Filipinos used to undergo a lengthy process of authenticating public documents like birth certificates, marriage certificates, death certificates, university diplomas, and professional licensure certificates required for employment or immigration.    The DFA advisory reads: PUBLIC ADVISORY: APOSTILLE CONVENTION ON AUTHENTICATION OF DOCUMENTS TAKES EFFECT IN PH ON 14 MAY 2019 Public Advisory: Apostille Convention on Authentication of Documents Takes Effect in PH on 14 May 2019  07 May 2019 — The Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA)—Office of Consular Affairs wishes to inform the public that it will no longer issue Authentication Certificates from 14 May 2019. Instead, the DFA will affix an Apostille to documents for use abroad as proof of authentication for use in Apostille-contracting parties.  After authentication by the DFA, there is no more need for authentication (legalization) by the concerned Foreign Embassies or Consulates General if the country or territory of destination of the authenticated document is already a member of the Apostille Convention.  Public documents executed in Apostille-contracting countries and territories (except for Austria, Finland, Germany, and Greece) to be used in the Philippines no longer have to be authenticated by the Philippine Embassy or Consulate General once Apostillized.  However, in countries and territories which are not Apostille-contracting parties, the previous process of authentication applies.  Documents still have to be authenticated by the Philippine Embassy or Consulate General before they can be used in the Philippines.  Also, there is still a need for authentication (legalization) by the concerned Foreign Embassies or Consulates General if the country of destination of the authenticated document is not yet a member of the Apostille Convention.  Authentication fees will remain at PhP100 (regular processing) and PhP200 (expedited processing) per document.   For the updated list of Apostille-contracting parties, please visit this link.   Ads  The following countries no longer require authentication of documents.   Contracting Party S 1 R/A/S2 Type3 EIF4 EXT5 Auth6 Res/D/N/DC7 Albania  3-IX-2003 A 9-V-2004  1  Andorra  15-IV-1996 A 31-XII-1996  1  Antigua and Barbuda  1-V-1985 Su 1-XI-1981  1  Argentina  8-V-1987 A 18-II-1988  1 D Armenia  19-XI-1993 A 14-VIII-1994  1  Australia  11-VII-1994 A 16-III-1995  1 D Austria 5-X-1961 14-XI-1967 R 13-I-1968  1 D Azerbaijan  13-V-2004 A** 2-III-2005  1  Bahamas  30-IV-1976 Su 10-VII-1973  1  Bahrain  10-IV-2013 A 31-XII-2013  1 D Barbados  11-VIII-1995 Su 30-XI-1966  1  Belarus  16-VI-1992 Su 31-V-1992  1  Belgium 10-III-1970 11-XII-1975 R 9-II-1976  1  Belize  17-VII-1992 A 11-IV-1993  1  Bolivia  6-IX-2017 A 7-V-2018  1  Bosnia and Herzegovina  23-VIII-1993 Su 6-III-1992  1 D Botswana  16-IX-1968 Su 30-IX-1966  1  Brazil  2-XII-2015 A 14-VIII-2016  1 D Brunei Darussalam  23-II-1987 A 3-XII-1987  1  Bulgaria  1-VIII-2000 A 29-IV-2001  1  Burundi  10-VI-2014 A** 13-II-2015  1  Cabo Verde  7-V-2009 A 13-II-2010  1  Chile  16-XII-2015 A 30-VIII-2016  1  China, People's Republic of   C   2 D,N Colombia  27-IV-2000 A 30-I-2001  1 D Cook Islands  13-VII-2004 A 30-IV-2005  1  Costa Rica  6-IV-2011 A 14-XII-2011  1  Croatia  23-IV-1993 Su 8-X-1991  1  Cyprus  26-VII-1972 A 30-IV-1973  1  Czech Republic  23-VI-1998 A 16-III-1999  1  Denmark 20-X-2006 30-X-2006 R 29-XII-2006  1 D Dominica  22-X-2002 Su 3-XI-1978  1  Dominican Republic  12-XII-2008 A** 30-VIII-2009  1  Ecuador  2-VII-2004 A 2-IV-2005  1 D El Salvador  14-IX-1995 A 31-V-1996  1  Estonia  11-XII-2000 A 30-IX-2001  1 D Eswatini (formerly Swaziland)  3-VII-1978 Su 6-IX-1968  1  Fiji  29-III-1971 Su 10-X-1970  1  Finland 13-III-1962 27-VI-1985 R 26-VIII-1985  1 D France 9-X-1961 25-XI-1964 R 24-I-1965  1 D Georgia  21-VIII-2006 A 14-V-2007  1 D Germany 5-X-1961 15-XII-1965 R 13-II-1966  1 D,N Greece 5-X-1961 19-III-1985 R 18-V-1985  1  Grenada  17-VII-2001 A 7-IV-2002  1  Guatemala  19-I-2017 A 18-IX-2017  1 D Guyana  30-VII-2018 A 18-IV-2019  1  Honduras  20-I-2004 A 30-IX-2004  1  Hungary  18-IV-1972 A 18-I-1973  1 D Iceland 7-IX-2004 28-IX-2004 R 27-XI-2004  1  India  26-X-2004 A** 14-VII-2005  1  Ireland 29-X-1996 8-I-1999 R 9-III-1999  1  Israel  11-XI-1977 A 14-VIII-1978  1  Italy 15-XII-1961 13-XII-1977 R 11-II-1978  1  Japan 12-III-1970 28-V-1970 R 27-VII-1970  1  Kazakhstan  5-IV-2000 A 30-I-2001  1 D Korea, Republic of  25-X-2006 A 14-VII-2007  1  Kosovo  6-XI-2015 A** 14-VII-2016  1 D,DC Kyrgyzstan  15-XI-2010 A** 31-VII-2011  1  Latvia  11-V-1995 A 30-I-1996  1 D Lesotho  24-IV-1972 Su 4-X-1966  1  Liberia  24-V-1995 A** 8-II-1996  1  Liechtenstein 18-IV-1962 19-VII-1972 R 17-IX-1972  1  Lithuania  5-XI-1996 A 19-VII-1997  1  Luxembourg 5-X-1961 4-IV-1979 R 3-VI-1979  1  Malawi  24-II-1967 A 2-XII-1967  1  Malta  12-VI-1967 A 3-III-1968  1  Marshall Islands  18-XI-1991 A 14-VIII-1992  1  Mauritius  20-XII-1968 Su 12-III-1968  1  Mexico  1-XII-1994 A 14-VIII-1995  1  Monaco  24-IV-2002 A 31-XII-2002  1  Mongolia  2-IV-2009 A** 31-XII-2009  1  Montenegro  30-I-2007 Su 3-VI-2006  1  Morocco  27-XI-2015 A** 14-VIII-2016  1  Namibia  25-IV-2000 A 30-I-2001  1  Netherlands 30-XI-1962 9-VIII-1965 R 8-X-1965 4 1 D New Zealand  7-II-2001 A 22-XI-2001  1 D Nicaragua  7-IX-2012 A 14-V-2013  1  Niue  10-VI-1998 A 2-III-1999  1  Norway 30-V-1983 30-V-1983 R 29-VII-1983  1  Oman  12-V-2011 A 30-I-2012  1  Panama  30-X-1990 A 4-VIII-1991  1  Paraguay  10-XII-2013 A** 30-VIII-2014  1  Peru  13-I-2010 A** 30-IX-2010  1  Philippines  12-IX-2018 A** 14-V-2019  1 D Poland  19-XI-2004 A 14-VIII-2005  1  Portugal 20-VIII-1965 6-XII-1968 R 4-II-1969  1 D Republic of Moldova  19-VI-2006 A** 16-III-2007  1  Republic of North Macedonia  20-IX-1993 Su 17-XI-1991  1  Romania  7-VI-2000 A 16-III-2001  1 D Russian Federation  4-IX-1991 Su 31-V-1992  1 D,N Saint Kitts and Nevis  26-II-1994 A 14-XII-1994  1  Saint Lucia  5-XII-2001 A 31-VII-2002  1  Saint Vincent and the Grenadines  2-V-2002 Su 27-X-1979  1  Samoa  18-I-1999 A 13-IX-1999  1  San Marino  26-V-1994 A 13-II-1995  1  Sao Tome and Principe  19-XII-2007 A 13-IX-2008  1  Serbia  26-IV-2001 Su 27-IV-1992  1 D Seychelles  9-VI-1978 A 31-III-1979  1  Slovakia  6-VI-2001 A 18-II-2002  1  Slovenia  8-VI-1992 Su 25-VI-1991  1  South Africa  3-VIII-1994 A 30-IV-1995  1  Spain 21-X-1976 27-VII-1978 R 25-IX-1978  1 D Suriname  29-X-1976 Su 25-XI-1975  1  Sweden 2-III-1999 2-III-1999 R 1-V-1999  1  Switzerland 5-X-1961 10-I-1973 R 11-III-1973  1 D Tajikistan  20-II-2015 A** 31-X-2015  1  Tonga  28-X-1971 Su 4-VI-1970  1 D Trinidad and Tobago  28-X-1999 A 14-VII-2000  1  Tunisia  10-VII-2017 A** 30-III-2018  1  Turkey 8-V-1962 31-VII-1985 R 29-IX-1985  1  Ukraine  2-IV-2003 A 22-XII-2003  1 D United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland 19-X-1961 21-VIII-1964 R 24-I-1965 13 1 D United States of America  24-XII-1980 A 15-X-1981  1 D Uruguay  9-II-2012 A 14-X-2012  1  Uzbekistan  25-VII-2011 A** 15-IV-2012  1  Vanuatu  1-VIII-2008 Su 30-VII-1980  1  Venezuela  Sponsored Links    For those in the Philippines, the usual process is that after getting an original or certified true copy, they need to apply the document for authentication or popularly known as the “red ribbon” at the DFA, and then submit it to the concerned foreign embassy or consulate where they are going to. For Filipinos outside the country, a public document issued by the foreign government needs authentication by the foreign ministry and then by the Philippine embassy or nearest consulate.  Starting May 14, this two-step authentication process is now cut to one step only — with the DFA only affix an Apostille to document being submitted. It also applies to Filipinos in countries which signed the Apostille Convention  Top destination countries for OFWs which are also members of the Apostille Convention include the United States,  However, for Filipinos in countries which are not members of the Apostille Convention like the UAE, red ribbons and foreign embassy authentication are still required.  Authentication fees will remain at P100 for regular processing and P200 for expedited processing per document.
 The DFA advisory reads:

PUBLIC ADVISORY: APOSTILLE CONVENTION ON AUTHENTICATION OF DOCUMENTS TAKES EFFECT IN PH ON 14 MAY 2019

Public Advisory: Apostille Convention on Authentication of Documents Takes Effect in PH on 14 May 2019
07 May 2019 — The Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA)—Office of Consular Affairs wishes to inform the public that it will no longer issue Authentication Certificates from 14 May 2019. Instead, the DFA will affix an Apostille to documents for use abroad as proof of authentication for use in Apostille-contracting parties.
After authentication by the DFA, there is no more need for authentication (legalization) by the concerned Foreign Embassies or Consulates General if the country or territory of destination of the authenticated document is already a member of the Apostille Convention.
Public documents executed in Apostille-contracting countries and territories (except for Austria, Finland, Germany, and Greece) to be used in the Philippines no longer have to be authenticated by the Philippine Embassy or Consulate General once Apostillized.
However, in countries and territories which are not Apostille-contracting parties, the previous process of authentication applies.  Documents still have to be authenticated by the Philippine Embassy or Consulate General before they can be used in the Philippines.  Also, there is still a need for authentication (legalization) by the concerned Foreign Embassies or Consulates General if the country of destination of the authenticated document is not yet a member of the Apostille Convention.
Authentication fees will remain at PhP100 (regular processing) and PhP200 (expedited processing) per document. 
For the updated list of Apostille-contracting parties, please visit this link.

Ads

The following countries which are members of the convention no longer require authentication of documents.


Albania
Andorra
Antigua and Barbuda
Argentina
Armenia
Australia
Austria
Azerbaijan
Bahamas
Bahrain
Barbados
Belarus
Belgium
Belize
Bolivia
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Botswana
Brazil
Brunei Darussalam
Bulgaria1
Burundi
Cabo Verde
Chile
China, People's Republic of
Colombia
Cook Islands
Costa Rica
Croatia
Cyprus
Czech Republic
Denmark
Dominica
Dominican Republic
Ecuador
El Salvador
Estonia
Eswatini (formerly Swaziland)
Fiji
Finland
France
Georgia
Germany
Greece
Grenada
Guatemala
Guyana
Honduras
Hungary
Iceland
India
Ireland

Israel
Italy1
Japan
Kazakhstan
Korea, Republic of
Kosovo
Kyrgyzstan1
Latvia
Lesotho
Liberia
Liechtenstein
Lithuania
Luxembourg
Malawi
Malta
Marshall Islands
Mauritius
Mexico1
Monaco
Mongolia
Montenegro3
Morocco
Namibia
Netherlands
New Zealand
Nicaragua
Niue
Norway
Oman
Panama
Paraguay
Peru
Philippines
Poland
Portuga
Republic of Moldova
Republic of North Macedonia
Romania
Russian Federation
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines
Samoa
San Marino
Sao Tome and Principe
Serbia
Seychelles
Slovakia
Slovenia
South Africa
Spain
Suriname
Sweden
Switzerland
Tajikistan
Tonga
Trinidad and Tobago
Tunisia
Turkey
Ukraine
United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
United States of America
Uruguay
Uzbekistan
Vanuatu1
Venezuela

Sponsored Links


For those in the Philippines, the usual process is that after getting an original or certified true copy, they need to apply the document for authentication or popularly known as the “red ribbon” at the DFA, and then submit it to the concerned foreign embassy or consulate where they are going to. For Filipinos outside the country, a public document issued by the foreign government needs authentication by the foreign ministry and then by the Philippine embassy or nearest consulate.

Starting May 14, this two-step authentication process is now cut to one step only — with the DFA only affix an Apostille to document being submitted. It also applies to Filipinos in countries which signed the Apostille Convention

However, for Filipinos in countries which are not members of the Apostille Convention like the UAE, red ribbons and foreign embassy authentication are still required.

Authentication fees will remain at P100 for regular processing and P200 for expedited processing per document.
©2019 THOUGHTSKOTO