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Tuesday, February 19, 2019

Philippine Economy Continues To Rise

The Philippines is gaining its high economic status being included in the ASEAN 5. 
“The Global Competitiveness Report (GCR) is a yearly report published by the World Economic Forum. Since 2004, the Global Competitiveness Report ranks countries based on the Global Competitiveness Index, developed by Xavier Sala-i-Martin and Elsa V. Artadi. Before that, the macroeconomic ranks were based on Jeffrey Sachs‘s Growth Development Index and the microeconomic ranks were based on Michael Porter‘s Business Competitiveness Index. The Global Competitiveness Index integrates the macroeconomic and the micro/business aspects of competitiveness into a single index.

The Philippines is gaining its high economic status being included in the ASEAN 5.   “The Global Competitiveness Report (GCR) is a yearly report published by the World Economic Forum. Since 2004, the Global Competitiveness Report ranks countries based on the Global Competitiveness Index, developed by Xavier Sala-i-Martin and Elsa V. Artadi.[1] Before that, the macroeconomic ranks were based on Jeffrey Sachs‘s Growth Development Index and the microeconomic ranks were based on Michael Porter‘s Business Competitiveness Index. The Global Competitiveness Index integrates the macroeconomic and the micro/business aspects of competitiveness into a single index.       Ads    A news article published recently headlined Philippines as the fastest-growing among the five largest economies in Southeast Asia also known as the “ASEAN 5.” Based on a report by the Country’s National Statistical Coordination Board (NSCB), the Philippines beat Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, and Thailand in terms of economic growth in recent quarters. The country’s gross domestic product (GDP), the main benchmark of economic growth, rose by 6.8 percent in 2012 and by 7.6 percent which started in the first six months of 2013.   This is very positive news about the Philippines. The country is truly booming and is now attracting investors around the world. If you are an OFW or a Filipino migrant, it’s high time that you will do your share and invest in our country and together, we can help the Philippines soar to the next level.      "The Philippines 5: Writing The Next Chapter" is a very inspiring documentary about the Philippines’ rising economy by the Asia Business Channel aired in 2013. Today, economic growth is even rising to make the Philippines ideal for foreign investment.    The Philippines’ GDP is Rising! The Philippines as the fastest growing economy in Asia  In a supplement to its Asian Development Outlook 2018 Update report released on Wednesday, the ADB maintained its economic growth outlook for the Philippines at 6.4 percent this year and 6.7 percent for 2019.  The Philippine gross domestic product (GDP) remained strong at 6.3 percent in the first three quarters of 2018, though moderating from 6.8 percent last year.  The investment was the biggest contributor to growth, followed by household consumption.  The ADB also retained its growth forecast for Southeast Asia at 5.1 percent for 2018, assuming robust consumption and infrastructure investment.   The report “assesses the ability of countries to provide high levels of prosperity to their citizens. This, in turn, depends on how productively a country uses available resources. Therefore, the Global Competitiveness Index measures the set of institutions, policies, and factors that set the sustainable current and medium-term levels of economic prosperity.”    While posting the highest growth rate, the Philippines, however, has the lowest GDP per capita at only $4,339 in 2012 versus the ASEAN 5 average of $7,010.  GDP per capita is the country’s total economic output divided among its population. This means that Pinoys’ income measured per person is the lowest in ASEAN 5.  Singapore posted the highest per capita GDP in the group at $61,461, followed by Malaysia ($16,976), Thailand ($9,609) and Indonesia ($4,971).  The Philippines’ economic expansion is good news, Albert said. But he added that “much remains to be done to sustain such high growth trajectory and to make it inclusive.”  The statistics chief added that ensuring that growth is sustained and shared by everyone is “not solely the government’s responsibility but is equally shared by the private sector.”

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A news article published recently headlined Philippines as the fastest-growing among the five largest economies in Southeast Asia also known as the “ASEAN 5.” Based on a report by the Country’s National Statistical Coordination Board (NSCB), the Philippines beat Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, and Thailand in terms of economic growth in recent quarters. The country’s gross domestic product (GDP), the main benchmark of economic growth, rose by 6.8 percent in 2012 and by 7.6 percent which started in the first six months of 2013.


This is very positive news about the Philippines. The country is truly booming and is now attracting investors around the world. If you are an OFW or a Filipino migrant, it’s high time that you will do your share and invest in our country and together, we can help the Philippines soar to the next level.

The Philippines is gaining its high economic status being included in the ASEAN 5.   “The Global Competitiveness Report (GCR) is a yearly report published by the World Economic Forum. Since 2004, the Global Competitiveness Report ranks countries based on the Global Competitiveness Index, developed by Xavier Sala-i-Martin and Elsa V. Artadi.[1] Before that, the macroeconomic ranks were based on Jeffrey Sachs‘s Growth Development Index and the microeconomic ranks were based on Michael Porter‘s Business Competitiveness Index. The Global Competitiveness Index integrates the macroeconomic and the micro/business aspects of competitiveness into a single index.       Ads    A news article published recently headlined Philippines as the fastest-growing among the five largest economies in Southeast Asia also known as the “ASEAN 5.” Based on a report by the Country’s National Statistical Coordination Board (NSCB), the Philippines beat Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, and Thailand in terms of economic growth in recent quarters. The country’s gross domestic product (GDP), the main benchmark of economic growth, rose by 6.8 percent in 2012 and by 7.6 percent which started in the first six months of 2013.   This is very positive news about the Philippines. The country is truly booming and is now attracting investors around the world. If you are an OFW or a Filipino migrant, it’s high time that you will do your share and invest in our country and together, we can help the Philippines soar to the next level.      "The Philippines 5: Writing The Next Chapter" is a very inspiring documentary about the Philippines’ rising economy by the Asia Business Channel aired in 2013. Today, economic growth is even rising to make the Philippines ideal for foreign investment.    The Philippines’ GDP is Rising! The Philippines as the fastest growing economy in Asia  In a supplement to its Asian Development Outlook 2018 Update report released on Wednesday, the ADB maintained its economic growth outlook for the Philippines at 6.4 percent this year and 6.7 percent for 2019.  The Philippine gross domestic product (GDP) remained strong at 6.3 percent in the first three quarters of 2018, though moderating from 6.8 percent last year.  The investment was the biggest contributor to growth, followed by household consumption.  The ADB also retained its growth forecast for Southeast Asia at 5.1 percent for 2018, assuming robust consumption and infrastructure investment.   The report “assesses the ability of countries to provide high levels of prosperity to their citizens. This, in turn, depends on how productively a country uses available resources. Therefore, the Global Competitiveness Index measures the set of institutions, policies, and factors that set the sustainable current and medium-term levels of economic prosperity.”    While posting the highest growth rate, the Philippines, however, has the lowest GDP per capita at only $4,339 in 2012 versus the ASEAN 5 average of $7,010.  GDP per capita is the country’s total economic output divided among its population. This means that Pinoys’ income measured per person is the lowest in ASEAN 5.  Singapore posted the highest per capita GDP in the group at $61,461, followed by Malaysia ($16,976), Thailand ($9,609) and Indonesia ($4,971).  The Philippines’ economic expansion is good news, Albert said. But he added that “much remains to be done to sustain such high growth trajectory and to make it inclusive.”  The statistics chief added that ensuring that growth is sustained and shared by everyone is “not solely the government’s responsibility but is equally shared by the private sector.”
"The Philippines 5: Writing The Next Chapter" is a very inspiring documentary about the Philippines’ rising economy by the Asia Business Channel aired in 2013. Today, economic growth is even rising to make the Philippines ideal for foreign investment. 


The Philippines’ GDP is Rising!
The Philippines as the fastest growing economy in Asia
In a supplement to its Asian Development Outlook 2018 Update report released on Wednesday, the ADB maintained its economic growth outlook for the Philippines at 6.4 percent this year and 6.7 percent for 2019.

The Philippine gross domestic product (GDP) remained strong at 6.3 percent in the first three quarters of 2018, though moderating from 6.8 percent last year.

The investment was the biggest contributor to growth, followed by household consumption.

The ADB also retained its growth forecast for Southeast Asia at 5.1 percent for 2018, assuming robust consumption and infrastructure investment.


The report “assesses the ability of countries to provide high levels of prosperity to their citizens. This, in turn, depends on how productively a country uses available resources. Therefore, the Global Competitiveness Index measures the set of institutions, policies, and factors that set the sustainable current and medium-term levels of economic prosperity.”

While posting the highest growth rate, the Philippines, however, has the lowest GDP per capita at only $4,339 in 2012 versus the ASEAN 5 average of $7,010.

GDP per capita is the country’s total economic output divided among its population. This means that Pinoys’ income measured per person is the lowest in ASEAN 5.

Singapore posted the highest per capita GDP in the group at $61,461, followed by Malaysia ($16,976), Thailand ($9,609) and Indonesia ($4,971).

The Philippines’ economic expansion is good news, Albert said. But he added that “much remains to be done to sustain such high growth trajectory and to make it inclusive.”

The statistics chief added that ensuring that growth is sustained and shared by everyone is “not solely the government’s responsibility but is equally shared by the private sector.”

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In the real world, availing loans is sometimes inevitable. Financial problems often come unannounced and if you do not have enough savings, you most probably end up getting a loan from a friend, a loan company or a bank. Many overseas Filipino workers (OFW), for example, avail loans specifically designed for people working abroad and seafarers.   https://www.jbsolis.com/2019/02/move-to-these-places-and-get-paid-if.html    Ads    In the society we live in, applying for a loan correlates to debt. In reality, loans actually help people build and establish a credit history to which banking and finance companies refer.   In applying for a loan, whether from a loan company or from a bank, having a good credit history helps you to be approved quickly.    However, there are many types of loans designed for specific needs. Terms and conditions in each type are also different.  In this article, we will break down for you the types of loans and help you decide which ones do you need.   OFW loan – OFW loans work similarly as personal loans but are specifically offered to overseas Filipino workers with valid contracts. A co-borrower or immediate relative based in the Philippines is required. It usually has flexible payment terms to accommodate the specific needs of OFWs and their families.   Personal loan – Personal loans are usually unsecured loans, which means it’s based purely on an individual’s credit score and does not require any collateral, unlike secured loans. The interest rates may range from 1.2 percent to 8 percent, depending on the financial institution. Payment terms are typically shorter, from six to 60 months.  Car loan – Car loans are for people who don’t have enough cash to shoulder the full purchase of a vehicle. It has flexible payment terms of three to five years. To apply for a car loan, simply submit valid IDs and proof of income to get pre-approved. It may be required to have the down payment for the car to get approved.  Business loan – Business loans can be used for a new business or the expansion of an existing one. Examples are line credit, equipment loan, and conventional business loan. Terms depend on the nature of the business and the agreement between the borrower and the lender.  Home loan – Housing loan interest rates are decided between the borrower and the financial institution, with payment terms ranging from five to 30 years. The lender maintains property rights as collateral, and an appraisal fee typically applies.  Credit cards or cash advances – Cash advances are short-term loans with higher interest rates and are typically paid for the following month. Some credit card companies offer longer terms, from three to 12 months. The amount a person can borrow depends on their credit limit.

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