Send money to the Philippines Online!

Send money to the Philippines Online!
Remit.com.au makes sending funds to friends and family in the Philippines as easy

Carousel

Sponsored Links
SEARCH THIS SITE
JBSOLIS is a site for overseas Filipino workers, health and insurances, OWWA, PAG-IBIG, bank and cash loans, foreclosed properties, small house designs, local and overseas job listings.
Advertisement
Showing posts with label iraq. Show all posts
Showing posts with label iraq. Show all posts

Sunday, November 04, 2018

Saudi Arabia Canceling Sponsorship System For Certain Jobs?


The kafala or sponsorship system is a system used in monitoring migrant laborers who are working primarily in the construction and domestic sectors in  Middle Eastern countries such as Bahrain, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the UAE. Attributed to modern-day slavery that puts expatriate workers including overseas Filipino workers (OFW) deployed as household service workers (HSW) vulnerable to abuse and maltreatment.
The kafala or sponsorship system is a system used in monitoring migrant laborers who are working primarily in the construction and domestic sectors in  Middle Eastern countries such as Bahrain, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the UAE. Attributed to modern-day slavery that puts expatriate workers including overseas Filipino workers (OFW) deployed as household service workers (HSW) vulnerable to abuse and maltreatment.         Ads  Sponsored Links    An article that was written in Akhbrna claimed that a reliable source said that Saudi Arabia on its effort for the development of human resources will be giving a number of professionals mentioned under the certain sector permanent residence.  Saudi Arabia issued a resolution on the granting of permanent residence 5 years renewable for a number of Arab nationalities.  The source also confirmed that the sponsorship for more than 24 professions was already canceled. The Kingdom announced new decisive measures to replace the sponsorship system for certin professions, the article added.  Which had long awaited the establishment of an easier system for their lives instead of the system of injustice suffered by some residents due to the persecution of some of their sponsors, after the Kingdom confirmed the preservation of all the rights of residents inside?  Saudi sources said that Saudi Arabia is only a few steps away from putting an alternative to the guarantor system in the Kingdom, and not only that but will take decisive measures to cancel the sponsorship of a number of occupations occupied by some residents in the Kingdom including the following: Workshop workers. Supply workers. Craftsmen. Employees in the field of contracting.  The Kingdom gave all residents of the Kingdom and any expatriates the possibility of transferring bail alone in some cases to eliminate the persecution of the sponsor to some residents.  After giving the opportunity to a number of expatriates to work without the need for a sponsor in the Kingdom, especially the administrative professions, engineering professions, and doctor's profession, considering that this opportunity is a bold step from the Kingdom in order to develop an alternative to the sponsorship system.  Thank you for following up on our news and we promise you always and never to provide everything that is better and new. We also promise to transfer all news from all news sources and facilitate reading it with credibility and transparency.       Ads     Meanwhile, the contracts of more than 71% expats working in government jobs have been terminated based on the decision of the Council of Ministers,    The Ministry of Civil Service will find qualified Saudis to fill vacancies created by the termination of contracts of expat workers.  According to statistics of the Ministry of Civil Service, the education and health sectors are still attracting expat workers.  Some 91% of expat workers in government jobs are employed in the education and health sectors.  There were about 60,000 expatriates working in the public sector last year, according to a statistical report by the Saudi Arabian Monetary Authority (SAMA).  The report said the total number of government employees — Saudis and non-Saudis — was 1.23 million with a drop of about 0.8 percent over their number in the previous year.  It said the number of Saudi women holding government jobs increased by about 0.4 percent to reach 476,000 compared to 697,000 men whose number decreased by about 0.95 percent compared to 2016.  SAMA said Saudis constituted 95.1 percent of government employees while male expatriates were 4.9 percent reaching 29,600 with a decrease of about 12.7 percent over their number the previous year. The report said non-Saudi women workers were 30,800 with a decrease of about 7.3 percent over their number in 2016.  There were 474,153 Saudi women government employees in 2016 whose number went up slightly in 2017 to reach 476,347.  Filed under the  category of kafala , sponsorship system, Bahrain, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, UAE, modern-day slavery, expatriate workers , overseas Filipino workers, household service workers , abuse , maltreatment.


Ads

Sponsored Links


An article that was written in Akhbrna claimed that a reliable source said that Saudi Arabia on its effort for the development of human resources will be giving a number of professionals mentioned under the certain sector permanent residence.
 Saudi Arabia issued a resolution on the granting of permanent residence 5 years renewable for a number of Arab nationalities.

The source also confirmed that the sponsorship for more than 24 professions was already canceled. The Kingdom announced new decisive measures to replace the sponsorship system for certin professions, the article added.

Which had long awaited the establishment of an easier system for their lives instead of the system of injustice suffered by some residents due to the persecution of some of their sponsors, after the Kingdom confirmed the preservation of all the rights of residents inside?

Saudi sources said that Saudi Arabia is only a few steps away from putting an alternative to the guarantor system in the Kingdom, and not only that but will take decisive measures to cancel the sponsorship of a number of occupations occupied by some residents in the Kingdom including the following:
Workshop workers.
Supply workers.
Craftsmen.
Employees in the field of contracting.

The Kingdom gave all residents of the Kingdom and any expatriates the possibility of transferring bail alone in some cases to eliminate the persecution of the sponsor to some residents.

After giving the opportunity to a number of expatriates to work without the need for a sponsor in the Kingdom, especially the administrative professions, engineering professions, and doctor's profession, considering that this opportunity is a bold step from the Kingdom in order to develop an alternative to the sponsorship system.

Thank you for following up on our news and we promise you always and never to provide everything that is better and new. We also promise to transfer all news from all news sources and facilitate reading it with credibility and transparency.
The kafala or sponsorship system is a system used in monitoring migrant laborers who are working primarily in the construction and domestic sectors in  Middle Eastern countries such as Bahrain, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the UAE. Attributed to modern-day slavery that puts expatriate workers including overseas Filipino workers (OFW) deployed as household service workers (HSW) vulnerable to abuse and maltreatment.         Ads  Sponsored Links    An article that was written in Akhbrna claimed that a reliable source said that Saudi Arabia on its effort for the development of human resources will be giving a number of professionals mentioned under the certain sector permanent residence.  Saudi Arabia issued a resolution on the granting of permanent residence 5 years renewable for a number of Arab nationalities.  The source also confirmed that the sponsorship for more than 24 professions was already canceled. The Kingdom announced new decisive measures to replace the sponsorship system for certin professions, the article added.  Which had long awaited the establishment of an easier system for their lives instead of the system of injustice suffered by some residents due to the persecution of some of their sponsors, after the Kingdom confirmed the preservation of all the rights of residents inside?  Saudi sources said that Saudi Arabia is only a few steps away from putting an alternative to the guarantor system in the Kingdom, and not only that but will take decisive measures to cancel the sponsorship of a number of occupations occupied by some residents in the Kingdom including the following: Workshop workers. Supply workers. Craftsmen. Employees in the field of contracting.  The Kingdom gave all residents of the Kingdom and any expatriates the possibility of transferring bail alone in some cases to eliminate the persecution of the sponsor to some residents.  After giving the opportunity to a number of expatriates to work without the need for a sponsor in the Kingdom, especially the administrative professions, engineering professions, and doctor's profession, considering that this opportunity is a bold step from the Kingdom in order to develop an alternative to the sponsorship system.  Thank you for following up on our news and we promise you always and never to provide everything that is better and new. We also promise to transfer all news from all news sources and facilitate reading it with credibility and transparency.       Ads     Meanwhile, the contracts of more than 71% expats working in government jobs have been terminated based on the decision of the Council of Ministers,    The Ministry of Civil Service will find qualified Saudis to fill vacancies created by the termination of contracts of expat workers.  According to statistics of the Ministry of Civil Service, the education and health sectors are still attracting expat workers.  Some 91% of expat workers in government jobs are employed in the education and health sectors.  There were about 60,000 expatriates working in the public sector last year, according to a statistical report by the Saudi Arabian Monetary Authority (SAMA).  The report said the total number of government employees — Saudis and non-Saudis — was 1.23 million with a drop of about 0.8 percent over their number in the previous year.  It said the number of Saudi women holding government jobs increased by about 0.4 percent to reach 476,000 compared to 697,000 men whose number decreased by about 0.95 percent compared to 2016.  SAMA said Saudis constituted 95.1 percent of government employees while male expatriates were 4.9 percent reaching 29,600 with a decrease of about 12.7 percent over their number the previous year. The report said non-Saudi women workers were 30,800 with a decrease of about 7.3 percent over their number in 2016.  There were 474,153 Saudi women government employees in 2016 whose number went up slightly in 2017 to reach 476,347.  Filed under the  category of kafala , sponsorship system, Bahrain, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, UAE, modern-day slavery, expatriate workers , overseas Filipino workers, household service workers , abuse , maltreatment.

Ads

 
Meanwhile, the contracts of more than 71% expats working in government jobs have been terminated based on the decision of the Council of Ministers,

The Ministry of Civil Service will find qualified Saudis to fill vacancies created by the termination of contracts of expat workers.

According to statistics of the Ministry of Civil Service, the education and health sectors are still attracting expat workers.

Some 91% of expat workers in government jobs are employed in the education and health sectors.

There were about 60,000 expatriates working in the public sector last year, according to a statistical report by the Saudi Arabian Monetary Authority (SAMA).

The report said the total number of government employees — Saudis and non-Saudis — was 1.23 million with a drop of about 0.8 percent over their number in the previous year.

It said the number of Saudi women holding government jobs increased by about 0.4 percent to reach 476,000 compared to 697,000 men whose number decreased by about 0.95 percent compared to 2016.

SAMA said Saudis constituted 95.1 percent of government employees while male expatriates were 4.9 percent reaching 29,600 with a decrease of about 12.7 percent over their number the previous year. The report said non-Saudi women workers were 30,800 with a decrease of about 7.3 percent over their number in 2016.

There were 474,153 Saudi women government employees in 2016 whose number went up slightly in 2017 to reach 476,347.

Filed under the  category of kafala , sponsorship system, Bahrain, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, UAE, modern-day slavery, expatriate workers , overseas Filipino workers, household service workers , abuse , maltreatment.
The kafala or sponsorship system is a system used in monitoring migrant laborers who are working primarily in the construction and domestic sectors in  Middle Eastern countries such as Bahrain, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the UAE. Attributed to modern-day slavery that puts expatriate workers including overseas Filipino workers (OFW) deployed as household service workers (HSW) vulnerable to abuse and maltreatment.         Ads  Sponsored Links    An article that was written in Akhbrna claimed that a reliable source said that Saudi Arabia on its effort for the development of human resources will be giving a number of professionals mentioned under the certain sector permanent residence.  Saudi Arabia issued a resolution on the granting of permanent residence 5 years renewable for a number of Arab nationalities.  The source also confirmed that the sponsorship for more than 24 professions was already canceled. The Kingdom announced new decisive measures to replace the sponsorship system for certin professions, the article added.  Which had long awaited the establishment of an easier system for their lives instead of the system of injustice suffered by some residents due to the persecution of some of their sponsors, after the Kingdom confirmed the preservation of all the rights of residents inside?  Saudi sources said that Saudi Arabia is only a few steps away from putting an alternative to the guarantor system in the Kingdom, and not only that but will take decisive measures to cancel the sponsorship of a number of occupations occupied by some residents in the Kingdom including the following: Workshop workers. Supply workers. Craftsmen. Employees in the field of contracting.  The Kingdom gave all residents of the Kingdom and any expatriates the possibility of transferring bail alone in some cases to eliminate the persecution of the sponsor to some residents.  After giving the opportunity to a number of expatriates to work without the need for a sponsor in the Kingdom, especially the administrative professions, engineering professions, and doctor's profession, considering that this opportunity is a bold step from the Kingdom in order to develop an alternative to the sponsorship system.  Thank you for following up on our news and we promise you always and never to provide everything that is better and new. We also promise to transfer all news from all news sources and facilitate reading it with credibility and transparency.       Ads     Meanwhile, the contracts of more than 71% expats working in government jobs have been terminated based on the decision of the Council of Ministers,    The Ministry of Civil Service will find qualified Saudis to fill vacancies created by the termination of contracts of expat workers.  According to statistics of the Ministry of Civil Service, the education and health sectors are still attracting expat workers.  Some 91% of expat workers in government jobs are employed in the education and health sectors.  There were about 60,000 expatriates working in the public sector last year, according to a statistical report by the Saudi Arabian Monetary Authority (SAMA).  The report said the total number of government employees — Saudis and non-Saudis — was 1.23 million with a drop of about 0.8 percent over their number in the previous year.  It said the number of Saudi women holding government jobs increased by about 0.4 percent to reach 476,000 compared to 697,000 men whose number decreased by about 0.95 percent compared to 2016.  SAMA said Saudis constituted 95.1 percent of government employees while male expatriates were 4.9 percent reaching 29,600 with a decrease of about 12.7 percent over their number the previous year. The report said non-Saudi women workers were 30,800 with a decrease of about 7.3 percent over their number in 2016.  There were 474,153 Saudi women government employees in 2016 whose number went up slightly in 2017 to reach 476,347.  Filed under the  category of kafala , sponsorship system, Bahrain, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, UAE, modern-day slavery, expatriate workers , overseas Filipino workers, household service workers , abuse , maltreatment.

READ MORE:
A Filipino woman faked her own death and stole her sister’s identity just to apply for a passport. Unfortunately, she is now about to lose her U.S. citizenship. Identity theft is a serious crime.      Ads  Sponsored Links  A 43-year-old Emilita Arindela, of Mount Desert Island, was sentenced to 10 days in jail for making a false statement on her passport application in federal court in Maine. It’s unclear if she will be stripped off of her American citizenship by federal authorities but it is more likely to happen.  Prosecutors say Arindela was already married when she married an American man in 2000. She moved to the U.S. in 2002 and later became a naturalized citizen, using her sister’s name. Arindela left her second husband and married another man in 2007.  Arindela’s lawyer says his client escaped an abusive marriage in the Philippines and has been a obedience to the US laws. Filed under the category of  Filipino woman , passport, U.S. citizenship, Identity theft
In spite of the rising prices of commodities and services and others due to the high inflation rate, many Filipinos believe that the country is on the right track. Just recently, the new minimum fare is being set to P10 while the minimum wage remains stuck. That is what the latest SWS survey indicates.      Ads      Sponsored Links   The latest survey shows that from 70% in the second quarter of this year, the statistics went up to 75%.  On the other hand, only 22% believed the Philippines is in the wrong path while 3% of the 1,500 respondents did not give an answer during the conducted survey.  Malacañang welcomes this result as a vindication that the administration is doing their job the keep the country on track.  “PRRD emphasized in numerous occasions that as government workers, we are here to serve the people. Our objective as public servants is thus being able to perform our respective duties well,” Presidential spokesperson Salvador Panelo said.  “Therefore, we treat the results of this recent survey not as an accolade but as an inspiration for our men and women in the government as they persist in carrying on with their roles in the service,” Panelo added.  According to the presidential spokesperson, the strong public appreciation would further engage the Filipino people in supporting the Duterte administration in building “a nation where all Filipinos can experience comfortable and decent lives under a trustworthy government.” Filed under the category of commodities and services, high inflation rate, Filipinos, minimum fare, minimum wage, SWS survey

©2018 THOUGHTSKOTO

Sunday, July 08, 2018

UPDATE: Two Filipino Women Kidnapped in Iraq have been Rescued

UPDATE:The two Filipino women abducted in Iraq last Friday have been rescued and some of their captors were arrested.

Foreign Affairs Secretary Allan Peter Cayetano expressed gratitude to authorities in Iraq for the swift and successful rescue of the two Filipinos who were reportedly seized by armed men.

The two are under police custody after they were rescued in Diyala Province, north of the capital, on Saturday.

Advertisement



For decades, Iraq has been a dangerous place. This was why the Philippine government used to ban Filipinos from travelling to the country since 2004. It is believed that 10,000 Filipinos work in Iraq illegally. The ban was upgraded to partial ban in 2013, with some precautionary measures. This does not mean that the country is now safe for Filipino workers. In fact, recent news coming from the country's security forces say that two Filipino Women have been kidnapped. Details of the kidnapping below.  The two Filipino women were kidnapped on Saturday in Iraq on a road connecting Baghdad to Kirkuk, security and local officials informed Reuters news agency. Kirkuk is part of the "no-go" areas still considered too dangerous for foreign workers. The others are the provinces of Anbar, Nineveh and Salahuddin.    The women were traveling with three other Filipinos on their way to Irbil, the capital of the Kurdistan Region, when their car broke down. The two women exited the car after it broke down. Unknown men drove by in a yellow car and grabbed them, a military source said.   The identities, affiliation, and motivation of the kidnappers were not immediately clear.  There has been an uptick in attacks and kidnappings by Daesh militants over the past few weeks near the area the women were taken from.  At least eight members of the security forces were kidnapped and later killed by the ultra-hardline militants on that same highway last month.

Sponsored Links


Earlier reports indicate that the four Filipinos came from Irbil in the northern Kurdistan region and were on their way to Baghdad when their vehicle broke down along the highway in Uzem District between Kirkuk and Diyala where they encountered armed men in a yellow car.

The women were then forcibly taken by the armed men after their driver abandoned their vehicle when it broke down. However, two of the four women were reportedly able to escape.

the Embassy would request custody of the four women as soon as the police investigation is concluded so that they can immediately be repatriated.

The Embassy estimated that there are 4,000 Filipinos working in Iraq, with around 3,000 based in the Kurdistan region.


Original Article:

For decades, Iraq has been a dangerous place. This was why the Philippine government used to ban Filipinos from travelling to the country since 2004. It is believed that up to 10,000 Filipinos work in Iraq illegally. The ban was upgraded to partial ban in 2013, with some precautionary measures. This does not mean that the country is now safe for Filipino workers. In fact, recent news coming from the country's security forces say that two Filipino Women have been kidnapped.

The two Filipino women were kidnapped on Saturday in Iraq on a road connecting Baghdad to Kirkuk, security and local officials informed Reuters news agency. Kirkuk is part of the "no-go" areas still considered too dangerous for foreign workers. The others are the provinces of Anbar, Nineveh and Salahuddin.


The women were traveling with three other Filipinos on their way to Irbil, the capital of the Kurdistan Region, when their car broke down. The two women exited the car after it broke down. Unknown men drove by in a yellow car and grabbed them, a military source said.
For decades, Iraq has been a dangerous place. This was why the Philippine government used to ban Filipinos from travelling to the country since 2004. It is believed that 10,000 Filipinos work in Iraq illegally. The ban was upgraded to partial ban in 2013, with some precautionary measures. This does not mean that the country is now safe for Filipino workers. In fact, recent news coming from the country's security forces say that two Filipino Women have been kidnapped. Details of the kidnapping below.  The two Filipino women were kidnapped on Saturday in Iraq on a road connecting Baghdad to Kirkuk, security and local officials informed Reuters news agency. Kirkuk is part of the "no-go" areas still considered too dangerous for foreign workers. The others are the provinces of Anbar, Nineveh and Salahuddin.    The women were traveling with three other Filipinos on their way to Irbil, the capital of the Kurdistan Region, when their car broke down. The two women exited the car after it broke down. Unknown men drove by in a yellow car and grabbed them, a military source said.   The identities, affiliation, and motivation of the kidnappers were not immediately clear.  There has been an uptick in attacks and kidnappings by Daesh militants over the past few weeks near the area the women were taken from.  At least eight members of the security forces were kidnapped and later killed by the ultra-hardline militants on that same highway last month.
The route as seen on a navigation map. The women were kidnapped on the highway between Baghdad and Kirkuk, on the way to Erbil.

The identities, affiliation, and motivation of the kidnappers were not immediately clear.
There has been an uptick in attacks and kidnappings by Daesh militants over the past few weeks near the area the women were taken from.
At least eight members of the security forces were kidnapped and later killed by the ultra-hardline militants on that same highway last month.


The security forces were believed to be victims of ISIS.

Wednesday, April 18, 2018

OFW Survival Stories


It is not only a few times we hear and read about overseas Filipino workers (OFW) being maltreated and abused by their employers, some of them even return home mentally disoriented and some even did not make it home alive. Importers trade commodities and products but in the Philippines, we export skilled and household workers alike. The latter has a significant number deployed all over the globe with over two million domestic helpers work in the Gulf countries such as Bahrain, Iraq, Iran, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates, where cases of abuse are registered.
Advertisement



It is not only a few times we hear and read about overseas Filipino workers (OFW) being maltreated and abused by their employers, some of them even return home mentally disoriented and some even did not make it home alive. Importers trade commodities and products but in the Philippines, we export skilled and household workers alike. The latter has a significant number deployed all over the globe with over two million domestic helpers work in the Gulf countries such as Bahrain, Iraq, Iran, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates, where cases of abuse are registered.  Advertisement       Sponsored Links     The story of Joanna Demafelis, a household worker who was found inside a freezer in her former employer's abandoned residence in Kuwait, made a significant way to address the rampant issue of HSWs abuse and maltreatment. To avoid further similar incidents, President Rodrigo Duterte through Labor Secretary Silvestre Bello III ordered immediate deployment ban of all OFWs bound to Kuwait. Should his demands to the government of Kuwait for better living condition and protection of the OFWs be met, the ban may be finally lifted.    Hundreds of maltreatment happened in several parts of the gulf. It could be referred to as modern-day slavery. Most household workers are not even allowed to take at least a day off in a week. Some of them are also receiving delayed salaries, some none at all. They are treated as commodities instead being a human.  Some of them are even sold to other employers.         There have been varying degrees of abuses perpetrated on domestic helpers, but these abuses have largely been tied to the Kafala system, a visa-sponsorship system implemented by Lebanon, Bahrain, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the UAE, where workers are essentially beholden to the demands of their employers. The employer or the sponsor is required to “assume full economic and legal responsibility” and has complete control over when the worker can leave and where the worker goes. It includes keeping the employee's passport, a usual practice in the Gulf countries. they do it to prevent the holder to escape from their custody.      While the Kafala system also applies to other migrant workers such as those working in construction, in hospitals, or in engineering, Dr. Jean Franco, an assistant professor at the University of the Philippines whose research focuses on the politics of gender and labor-out migration, says that the abuses carried by the Kafala are gravely felt by domestic helpers because they are not within the public sphere.  With the deployment ban in Kuwait, the Philippine government has somehow given the chance to show that it can do measures to alleviate and stop the maltreatment and the abuses to the HSWs and it could possibly be extended to other parts of the Middle East where many cases of abuse are happening.  Just recently, President Duterte has announced that the Kuwait government has already agreed to his terms favoring the OFWs working in their country.  Filipino resilience is always evident in every OFW. They can endure everything just for the sake of giving their beloved family the best future possible. They give a lot to the government by keeping the economy kicking by their remittances. In return, the government should always assure their welfare and safety.  READ MORE: Recruiters With Delisted, Banned, Suspended, Revoked And Cancelled POEA Licenses 2018    List of Philippine Embassies And Consulates Around The World       Classic Room Mates You Probably Living With   Do Not Be Fooled By Your Recruitment Agencies, Know Your  Correct Fees    Remittance Fees To Be Imposed On Kuwait Expats Expected To Bring $230 Million Income    TESDA Provides Training For Returning OFWs   Cash Aid To Be Given To Displaced OFWs From Kuwait—OWWA      Former OFW In Dubai Now Earning P25K A Week From Her Business    Top Search Engines In The Philippines For Finding Jobs Abroad    5 Signs A Person Is Going To Be Poor And 5 Signs You Are Going To Be Rich
Sponsored Links


The story of Joanna Demafelis, a household worker who was found inside a freezer in her former employer's abandoned residence in Kuwait, made a significant way to address the rampant issue of HSWs abuse and maltreatment. To avoid further similar incidents, President Rodrigo Duterte through Labor Secretary Silvestre Bello III ordered immediate deployment ban of all OFWs bound to Kuwait. Should his demands to the government of Kuwait for better living condition and protection of the OFWs be met, the ban may be finally lifted.
It is not only a few times we hear and read about overseas Filipino workers (OFW) being maltreated and abused by their employers, some of them even return home mentally disoriented and some even did not make it home alive. Importers trade commodities and products but in the Philippines, we export skilled and household workers alike. The latter has a significant number deployed all over the globe with over two million domestic helpers work in the Gulf countries such as Bahrain, Iraq, Iran, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates, where cases of abuse are registered.  Advertisement       Sponsored Links     The story of Joanna Demafelis, a household worker who was found inside a freezer in her former employer's abandoned residence in Kuwait, made a significant way to address the rampant issue of HSWs abuse and maltreatment. To avoid further similar incidents, President Rodrigo Duterte through Labor Secretary Silvestre Bello III ordered immediate deployment ban of all OFWs bound to Kuwait. Should his demands to the government of Kuwait for better living condition and protection of the OFWs be met, the ban may be finally lifted.    Hundreds of maltreatment happened in several parts of the gulf. It could be referred to as modern-day slavery. Most household workers are not even allowed to take at least a day off in a week. Some of them are also receiving delayed salaries, some none at all. They are treated as commodities instead being a human.  Some of them are even sold to other employers.         There have been varying degrees of abuses perpetrated on domestic helpers, but these abuses have largely been tied to the Kafala system, a visa-sponsorship system implemented by Lebanon, Bahrain, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the UAE, where workers are essentially beholden to the demands of their employers. The employer or the sponsor is required to “assume full economic and legal responsibility” and has complete control over when the worker can leave and where the worker goes. It includes keeping the employee's passport, a usual practice in the Gulf countries. they do it to prevent the holder to escape from their custody.      While the Kafala system also applies to other migrant workers such as those working in construction, in hospitals, or in engineering, Dr. Jean Franco, an assistant professor at the University of the Philippines whose research focuses on the politics of gender and labor-out migration, says that the abuses carried by the Kafala are gravely felt by domestic helpers because they are not within the public sphere.  With the deployment ban in Kuwait, the Philippine government has somehow given the chance to show that it can do measures to alleviate and stop the maltreatment and the abuses to the HSWs and it could possibly be extended to other parts of the Middle East where many cases of abuse are happening.  Just recently, President Duterte has announced that the Kuwait government has already agreed to his terms favoring the OFWs working in their country.  Filipino resilience is always evident in every OFW. They can endure everything just for the sake of giving their beloved family the best future possible. They give a lot to the government by keeping the economy kicking by their remittances. In return, the government should always assure their welfare and safety.  READ MORE: Recruiters With Delisted, Banned, Suspended, Revoked And Cancelled POEA Licenses 2018    List of Philippine Embassies And Consulates Around The World       Classic Room Mates You Probably Living With   Do Not Be Fooled By Your Recruitment Agencies, Know Your  Correct Fees    Remittance Fees To Be Imposed On Kuwait Expats Expected To Bring $230 Million Income    TESDA Provides Training For Returning OFWs   Cash Aid To Be Given To Displaced OFWs From Kuwait—OWWA      Former OFW In Dubai Now Earning P25K A Week From Her Business    Top Search Engines In The Philippines For Finding Jobs Abroad    5 Signs A Person Is Going To Be Poor And 5 Signs You Are Going To Be Rich
Hundreds of maltreatment happened in several parts of the gulf. It could be referred to as modern-day slavery. Most household workers are not even allowed to take at least a day off in a week. Some of them are also receiving delayed salaries, some none at all. Others are not even adequate food. They are treated as commodities instead being a human as if the employers own them like a piece of tool.
Some of them are even sold to other employers.

It is not only a few times we hear and read about overseas Filipino workers (OFW) being maltreated and abused by their employers, some of them even return home mentally disoriented and some even did not make it home alive. Importers trade commodities and products but in the Philippines, we export skilled and household workers alike. The latter has a significant number deployed all over the globe with over two million domestic helpers work in the Gulf countries such as Bahrain, Iraq, Iran, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates, where cases of abuse are registered.  Advertisement       Sponsored Links     The story of Joanna Demafelis, a household worker who was found inside a freezer in her former employer's abandoned residence in Kuwait, made a significant way to address the rampant issue of HSWs abuse and maltreatment. To avoid further similar incidents, President Rodrigo Duterte through Labor Secretary Silvestre Bello III ordered immediate deployment ban of all OFWs bound to Kuwait. Should his demands to the government of Kuwait for better living condition and protection of the OFWs be met, the ban may be finally lifted.    Hundreds of maltreatment happened in several parts of the gulf. It could be referred to as modern-day slavery. Most household workers are not even allowed to take at least a day off in a week. Some of them are also receiving delayed salaries, some none at all. They are treated as commodities instead being a human.  Some of them are even sold to other employers.         There have been varying degrees of abuses perpetrated on domestic helpers, but these abuses have largely been tied to the Kafala system, a visa-sponsorship system implemented by Lebanon, Bahrain, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the UAE, where workers are essentially beholden to the demands of their employers. The employer or the sponsor is required to “assume full economic and legal responsibility” and has complete control over when the worker can leave and where the worker goes. It includes keeping the employee's passport, a usual practice in the Gulf countries. they do it to prevent the holder to escape from their custody.      While the Kafala system also applies to other migrant workers such as those working in construction, in hospitals, or in engineering, Dr. Jean Franco, an assistant professor at the University of the Philippines whose research focuses on the politics of gender and labor-out migration, says that the abuses carried by the Kafala are gravely felt by domestic helpers because they are not within the public sphere.  With the deployment ban in Kuwait, the Philippine government has somehow given the chance to show that it can do measures to alleviate and stop the maltreatment and the abuses to the HSWs and it could possibly be extended to other parts of the Middle East where many cases of abuse are happening.  Just recently, President Duterte has announced that the Kuwait government has already agreed to his terms favoring the OFWs working in their country.  Filipino resilience is always evident in every OFW. They can endure everything just for the sake of giving their beloved family the best future possible. They give a lot to the government by keeping the economy kicking by their remittances. In return, the government should always assure their welfare and safety.  READ MORE: Recruiters With Delisted, Banned, Suspended, Revoked And Cancelled POEA Licenses 2018    List of Philippine Embassies And Consulates Around The World       Classic Room Mates You Probably Living With   Do Not Be Fooled By Your Recruitment Agencies, Know Your  Correct Fees    Remittance Fees To Be Imposed On Kuwait Expats Expected To Bring $230 Million Income    TESDA Provides Training For Returning OFWs   Cash Aid To Be Given To Displaced OFWs From Kuwait—OWWA      Former OFW In Dubai Now Earning P25K A Week From Her Business    Top Search Engines In The Philippines For Finding Jobs Abroad    5 Signs A Person Is Going To Be Poor And 5 Signs You Are Going To Be Rich

It is not only a few times we hear and read about overseas Filipino workers (OFW) being maltreated and abused by their employers, some of them even return home mentally disoriented and some even did not make it home alive. Importers trade commodities and products but in the Philippines, we export skilled and household workers alike. The latter has a significant number deployed all over the globe with over two million domestic helpers work in the Gulf countries such as Bahrain, Iraq, Iran, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates, where cases of abuse are registered.  Advertisement       Sponsored Links     The story of Joanna Demafelis, a household worker who was found inside a freezer in her former employer's abandoned residence in Kuwait, made a significant way to address the rampant issue of HSWs abuse and maltreatment. To avoid further similar incidents, President Rodrigo Duterte through Labor Secretary Silvestre Bello III ordered immediate deployment ban of all OFWs bound to Kuwait. Should his demands to the government of Kuwait for better living condition and protection of the OFWs be met, the ban may be finally lifted.    Hundreds of maltreatment happened in several parts of the gulf. It could be referred to as modern-day slavery. Most household workers are not even allowed to take at least a day off in a week. Some of them are also receiving delayed salaries, some none at all. They are treated as commodities instead being a human.  Some of them are even sold to other employers.         There have been varying degrees of abuses perpetrated on domestic helpers, but these abuses have largely been tied to the Kafala system, a visa-sponsorship system implemented by Lebanon, Bahrain, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the UAE, where workers are essentially beholden to the demands of their employers. The employer or the sponsor is required to “assume full economic and legal responsibility” and has complete control over when the worker can leave and where the worker goes. It includes keeping the employee's passport, a usual practice in the Gulf countries. they do it to prevent the holder to escape from their custody.      While the Kafala system also applies to other migrant workers such as those working in construction, in hospitals, or in engineering, Dr. Jean Franco, an assistant professor at the University of the Philippines whose research focuses on the politics of gender and labor-out migration, says that the abuses carried by the Kafala are gravely felt by domestic helpers because they are not within the public sphere.  With the deployment ban in Kuwait, the Philippine government has somehow given the chance to show that it can do measures to alleviate and stop the maltreatment and the abuses to the HSWs and it could possibly be extended to other parts of the Middle East where many cases of abuse are happening.  Just recently, President Duterte has announced that the Kuwait government has already agreed to his terms favoring the OFWs working in their country.  Filipino resilience is always evident in every OFW. They can endure everything just for the sake of giving their beloved family the best future possible. They give a lot to the government by keeping the economy kicking by their remittances. In return, the government should always assure their welfare and safety.  READ MORE: Recruiters With Delisted, Banned, Suspended, Revoked And Cancelled POEA Licenses 2018    List of Philippine Embassies And Consulates Around The World       Classic Room Mates You Probably Living With   Do Not Be Fooled By Your Recruitment Agencies, Know Your  Correct Fees    Remittance Fees To Be Imposed On Kuwait Expats Expected To Bring $230 Million Income    TESDA Provides Training For Returning OFWs   Cash Aid To Be Given To Displaced OFWs From Kuwait—OWWA      Former OFW In Dubai Now Earning P25K A Week From Her Business    Top Search Engines In The Philippines For Finding Jobs Abroad    5 Signs A Person Is Going To Be Poor And 5 Signs You Are Going To Be Rich

There have been varying degrees of abuses perpetrated on domestic helpers, but these abuses have largely been tied to the Kafala system, a visa-sponsorship system implemented by Lebanon, Bahrain, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the UAE, where workers are essentially beholden to the demands of their employers. The employer or the sponsor is required to “assume full economic and legal responsibility” and has complete control over when the worker can leave and where the worker goes.
It includes keeping the employee's passport, a usual practice in the Gulf countries. they do it to prevent the holder to escape from their custody.
It is not only a few times we hear and read about overseas Filipino workers (OFW) being maltreated and abused by their employers, some of them even return home mentally disoriented and some even did not make it home alive. Importers trade commodities and products but in the Philippines, we export skilled and household workers alike. The latter has a significant number deployed all over the globe with over two million domestic helpers work in the Gulf countries such as Bahrain, Iraq, Iran, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates, where cases of abuse are registered.  Advertisement       Sponsored Links     The story of Joanna Demafelis, a household worker who was found inside a freezer in her former employer's abandoned residence in Kuwait, made a significant way to address the rampant issue of HSWs abuse and maltreatment. To avoid further similar incidents, President Rodrigo Duterte through Labor Secretary Silvestre Bello III ordered immediate deployment ban of all OFWs bound to Kuwait. Should his demands to the government of Kuwait for better living condition and protection of the OFWs be met, the ban may be finally lifted.    Hundreds of maltreatment happened in several parts of the gulf. It could be referred to as modern-day slavery. Most household workers are not even allowed to take at least a day off in a week. Some of them are also receiving delayed salaries, some none at all. They are treated as commodities instead being a human.  Some of them are even sold to other employers.         There have been varying degrees of abuses perpetrated on domestic helpers, but these abuses have largely been tied to the Kafala system, a visa-sponsorship system implemented by Lebanon, Bahrain, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the UAE, where workers are essentially beholden to the demands of their employers. The employer or the sponsor is required to “assume full economic and legal responsibility” and has complete control over when the worker can leave and where the worker goes. It includes keeping the employee's passport, a usual practice in the Gulf countries. they do it to prevent the holder to escape from their custody.      While the Kafala system also applies to other migrant workers such as those working in construction, in hospitals, or in engineering, Dr. Jean Franco, an assistant professor at the University of the Philippines whose research focuses on the politics of gender and labor-out migration, says that the abuses carried by the Kafala are gravely felt by domestic helpers because they are not within the public sphere.  With the deployment ban in Kuwait, the Philippine government has somehow given the chance to show that it can do measures to alleviate and stop the maltreatment and the abuses to the HSWs and it could possibly be extended to other parts of the Middle East where many cases of abuse are happening.  Just recently, President Duterte has announced that the Kuwait government has already agreed to his terms favoring the OFWs working in their country.  Filipino resilience is always evident in every OFW. They can endure everything just for the sake of giving their beloved family the best future possible. They give a lot to the government by keeping the economy kicking by their remittances. In return, the government should always assure their welfare and safety.  READ MORE: Recruiters With Delisted, Banned, Suspended, Revoked And Cancelled POEA Licenses 2018    List of Philippine Embassies And Consulates Around The World       Classic Room Mates You Probably Living With   Do Not Be Fooled By Your Recruitment Agencies, Know Your  Correct Fees    Remittance Fees To Be Imposed On Kuwait Expats Expected To Bring $230 Million Income    TESDA Provides Training For Returning OFWs   Cash Aid To Be Given To Displaced OFWs From Kuwait—OWWA      Former OFW In Dubai Now Earning P25K A Week From Her Business    Top Search Engines In The Philippines For Finding Jobs Abroad    5 Signs A Person Is Going To Be Poor And 5 Signs You Are Going To Be Rich

While the Kafala system also applies to other migrant workers such as those working in construction, in hospitals, or in engineering, Dr. Jean Franco, an assistant professor at the University of the Philippines whose research focuses on the politics of gender and labor-out migration, says that the abuses carried by the Kafala are gravely felt by domestic helpers because they are not within the public sphere.
With the deployment ban in Kuwait, the Philippine government has somehow given the chance to show that it can do measures to alleviate and stop the maltreatment and the abuses to the HSWs and it could possibly be extended to other parts of the Middle East where many cases of abuse are happening. 
Just recently, President Duterte has announced that the Kuwait government has already agreed to his terms favoring the OFWs working in their country.

Filipino resilience is always evident in every OFW. They can endure everything just for the sake of giving their beloved family the best future possible. They give a lot to the government by keeping the economy kicking by their remittances. In return, the government should always assure their welfare and safety.

Monday, November 13, 2017

Middle East Iran-Iraq Border Earthquake in Photos and Videos


A 7.3 magnitude earthquake was felt in the Middle East particulkarly in Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, and part of Saudi Arabia.The  hardest hit province was Kermanshah. More than 142 of the victims were in Sarpol-e Zahab county in Kermanshah province, about 15 km (10 miles) from the Iraq border. According to the U.S. Geological Survey, its epicenter is at around 32km outside the Iraqi city of Halabja. About almost 400 people were killed by the disaster.    Sponsored Links        The damage extends to Kermansha, Iran where properties were badly damaged and lives were lost.    People of Iran work hand-in hand to find possible survivors of the devastating earthquake.  Advertisement Electricity and water was cut off in several Iranian and Iraqi cities, and fears of aftershocks sent thousands of people in both countries out onto the streets and parks in cold weather.  Rescue workers and special teams using sniffer dogs and heat sensors searched wreckage. The rescue operations had difficulties in reaching remote villages due to blockage.  Iranian authorities admit that the relief effort was slow and patchy to reach more than 70,000 people that needed emergency shelter especially that they are out, cold and in need of a shelter.     Read More:      ©2017 THOUGHTSKOTO
Advertisements



A 7.3 magnitude earthquake was felt in the Middle East particulkarly in Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, and part of Saudi Arabia.The  hardest hit province was Kermanshah. More than 142 of the victims were in Sarpol-e Zahab county in Kermanshah province, about 15 km (10 miles) from the Iraq border.
According to the U.S. Geological Survey, its epicenter is at around 32km outside the Iraqi city of Halabja.
About almost 400 people were killed by the disaster.
A 7.3 magnitude earthquake was felt in the Middle East particulkarly in Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, and part of Saudi Arabia.The  hardest hit province was Kermanshah. More than 142 of the victims were in Sarpol-e Zahab county in Kermanshah province, about 15 km (10 miles) from the Iraq border. According to the U.S. Geological Survey, its epicenter is at around 32km outside the Iraqi city of Halabja. About almost 400 people were killed by the disaster.    Sponsored Links        The damage extends to Kermansha, Iran where properties were badly damaged and lives were lost.    People of Iran work hand-in hand to find possible survivors of the devastating earthquake.  Advertisement Electricity and water was cut off in several Iranian and Iraqi cities, and fears of aftershocks sent thousands of people in both countries out onto the streets and parks in cold weather.  Rescue workers and special teams using sniffer dogs and heat sensors searched wreckage. The rescue operations had difficulties in reaching remote villages due to blockage.  Iranian authorities admit that the relief effort was slow and patchy to reach more than 70,000 people that needed emergency shelter especially that they are out, cold and in need of a shelter.     Read More:      ©2017 THOUGHTSKOTO
A 7.3 magnitude earthquake was felt in the Middle East particulkarly in Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, and part of Saudi Arabia.The  hardest hit province was Kermanshah. More than 142 of the victims were in Sarpol-e Zahab county in Kermanshah province, about 15 km (10 miles) from the Iraq border. According to the U.S. Geological Survey, its epicenter is at around 32km outside the Iraqi city of Halabja. About almost 400 people were killed by the disaster.    Sponsored Links        The damage extends to Kermansha, Iran where properties were badly damaged and lives were lost.    People of Iran work hand-in hand to find possible survivors of the devastating earthquake.  Advertisement Electricity and water was cut off in several Iranian and Iraqi cities, and fears of aftershocks sent thousands of people in both countries out onto the streets and parks in cold weather.  Rescue workers and special teams using sniffer dogs and heat sensors searched wreckage. The rescue operations had difficulties in reaching remote villages due to blockage.  Iranian authorities admit that the relief effort was slow and patchy to reach more than 70,000 people that needed emergency shelter especially that they are out, cold and in need of a shelter.     Read More:      ©2017 THOUGHTSKOTO
Sponsored Links

A 7.3 magnitude earthquake was felt in the Middle East particulkarly in Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, and part of Saudi Arabia.The  hardest hit province was Kermanshah. More than 142 of the victims were in Sarpol-e Zahab county in Kermanshah province, about 15 km (10 miles) from the Iraq border. According to the U.S. Geological Survey, its epicenter is at around 32km outside the Iraqi city of Halabja. About almost 400 people were killed by the disaster.    Sponsored Links        The damage extends to Kermansha, Iran where properties were badly damaged and lives were lost.    People of Iran work hand-in hand to find possible survivors of the devastating earthquake.  Advertisement Electricity and water was cut off in several Iranian and Iraqi cities, and fears of aftershocks sent thousands of people in both countries out onto the streets and parks in cold weather.  Rescue workers and special teams using sniffer dogs and heat sensors searched wreckage. The rescue operations had difficulties in reaching remote villages due to blockage.  Iranian authorities admit that the relief effort was slow and patchy to reach more than 70,000 people that needed emergency shelter especially that they are out, cold and in need of a shelter.     Read More:      ©2017 THOUGHTSKOTO
A 7.3 magnitude earthquake was felt in the Middle East particulkarly in Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, and part of Saudi Arabia.The  hardest hit province was Kermanshah. More than 142 of the victims were in Sarpol-e Zahab county in Kermanshah province, about 15 km (10 miles) from the Iraq border. According to the U.S. Geological Survey, its epicenter is at around 32km outside the Iraqi city of Halabja. About almost 400 people were killed by the disaster.    Sponsored Links        The damage extends to Kermansha, Iran where properties were badly damaged and lives were lost.    People of Iran work hand-in hand to find possible survivors of the devastating earthquake.  Advertisement Electricity and water was cut off in several Iranian and Iraqi cities, and fears of aftershocks sent thousands of people in both countries out onto the streets and parks in cold weather.  Rescue workers and special teams using sniffer dogs and heat sensors searched wreckage. The rescue operations had difficulties in reaching remote villages due to blockage.  Iranian authorities admit that the relief effort was slow and patchy to reach more than 70,000 people that needed emergency shelter especially that they are out, cold and in need of a shelter.     Read More:      ©2017 THOUGHTSKOTO

A 7.3 magnitude earthquake was felt in the Middle East particulkarly in Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, and part of Saudi Arabia.The  hardest hit province was Kermanshah. More than 142 of the victims were in Sarpol-e Zahab county in Kermanshah province, about 15 km (10 miles) from the Iraq border. According to the U.S. Geological Survey, its epicenter is at around 32km outside the Iraqi city of Halabja. About almost 400 people were killed by the disaster.    Sponsored Links        The damage extends to Kermansha, Iran where properties were badly damaged and lives were lost.    People of Iran work hand-in hand to find possible survivors of the devastating earthquake.  Advertisement Electricity and water was cut off in several Iranian and Iraqi cities, and fears of aftershocks sent thousands of people in both countries out onto the streets and parks in cold weather.  Rescue workers and special teams using sniffer dogs and heat sensors searched wreckage. The rescue operations had difficulties in reaching remote villages due to blockage.  Iranian authorities admit that the relief effort was slow and patchy to reach more than 70,000 people that needed emergency shelter especially that they are out, cold and in need of a shelter.     Read More:      ©2017 THOUGHTSKOTO

A 7.3 magnitude earthquake was felt in the Middle East particulkarly in Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, and part of Saudi Arabia.The  hardest hit province was Kermanshah. More than 142 of the victims were in Sarpol-e Zahab county in Kermanshah province, about 15 km (10 miles) from the Iraq border. According to the U.S. Geological Survey, its epicenter is at around 32km outside the Iraqi city of Halabja. About almost 400 people were killed by the disaster.    Sponsored Links        The damage extends to Kermansha, Iran where properties were badly damaged and lives were lost.    People of Iran work hand-in hand to find possible survivors of the devastating earthquake.  Advertisement Electricity and water was cut off in several Iranian and Iraqi cities, and fears of aftershocks sent thousands of people in both countries out onto the streets and parks in cold weather.  Rescue workers and special teams using sniffer dogs and heat sensors searched wreckage. The rescue operations had difficulties in reaching remote villages due to blockage.  Iranian authorities admit that the relief effort was slow and patchy to reach more than 70,000 people that needed emergency shelter especially that they are out, cold and in need of a shelter.     Read More:      ©2017 THOUGHTSKOTO
The damage extends to Kermansha, Iran where properties were badly damaged and lives were lost.
A 7.3 magnitude earthquake was felt in the Middle East particulkarly in Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, and part of Saudi Arabia.The  hardest hit province was Kermanshah. More than 142 of the victims were in Sarpol-e Zahab county in Kermanshah province, about 15 km (10 miles) from the Iraq border. According to the U.S. Geological Survey, its epicenter is at around 32km outside the Iraqi city of Halabja. About almost 400 people were killed by the disaster.    Sponsored Links        The damage extends to Kermansha, Iran where properties were badly damaged and lives were lost.    People of Iran work hand-in hand to find possible survivors of the devastating earthquake.  Advertisement Electricity and water was cut off in several Iranian and Iraqi cities, and fears of aftershocks sent thousands of people in both countries out onto the streets and parks in cold weather.  Rescue workers and special teams using sniffer dogs and heat sensors searched wreckage. The rescue operations had difficulties in reaching remote villages due to blockage.  Iranian authorities admit that the relief effort was slow and patchy to reach more than 70,000 people that needed emergency shelter especially that they are out, cold and in need of a shelter.     Read More:      ©2017 THOUGHTSKOTO


A 7.3 magnitude earthquake was felt in the Middle East particulkarly in Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, and part of Saudi Arabia.The  hardest hit province was Kermanshah. More than 142 of the victims were in Sarpol-e Zahab county in Kermanshah province, about 15 km (10 miles) from the Iraq border. According to the U.S. Geological Survey, its epicenter is at around 32km outside the Iraqi city of Halabja. About almost 400 people were killed by the disaster.    Sponsored Links        The damage extends to Kermansha, Iran where properties were badly damaged and lives were lost.    People of Iran work hand-in hand to find possible survivors of the devastating earthquake.  Advertisement Electricity and water was cut off in several Iranian and Iraqi cities, and fears of aftershocks sent thousands of people in both countries out onto the streets and parks in cold weather.  Rescue workers and special teams using sniffer dogs and heat sensors searched wreckage. The rescue operations had difficulties in reaching remote villages due to blockage.  Iranian authorities admit that the relief effort was slow and patchy to reach more than 70,000 people that needed emergency shelter especially that they are out, cold and in need of a shelter.     Read More:      ©2017 THOUGHTSKOTO
People of Iran work hand-in hand to find possible survivors of the devastating earthquake.
Advertisement
Electricity and water was cut off in several Iranian and Iraqi cities, and fears of aftershocks sent thousands of people in both countries out onto the streets and parks in cold weather.

Rescue workers and special teams using sniffer dogs and heat sensors searched wreckage. The rescue operations had difficulties in reaching remote villages due to blockage.

Iranian authorities admit that the relief effort was slow and patchy to reach more than 70,000 people that needed emergency shelter especially that they are out, cold and in need of a shelter.



Read More:






©2017 THOUGHTSKOTO

SEARCH JBSOLIS, TYPE KEYWORDS and TITLE OF ARTICLE at the box below