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Tuesday, May 22, 2018

In Spite of Changes in Saudi Arabia, Still, Women Cannot Do This 10 Things

Women can vote, yes. They are also allowed to obtain a college education, play sports, enter sports stadiums and by June, they are also allowed to drive. Reportedly, Women will be able to apply for their own driving licenses even without permission from their male guardians. In spite of this, rules that govern guardianship of women continue that will restrict them from doing many things including the following;
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Women can vote, yes. They are also allowed to obtain a college education, play sports, enter sports stadiums and by June, they are also allowed to drive. Reportedly, Women will be able to apply for their own driving licenses even without permission from their male guardians. In spite of this, rules that govern guardianship of women continue that will restrict them from doing many things including the following;  1. Wear clothes or makeup that "show off their beauty"  You cannot dress how you want in Saudi Arabia. "Dressing for beauty" is illegal. Modest clothing is encouraged. Full-length abayas - a long coat worn over other clothes - must be worn by all women in public, although in recent years rules over the color, decoration and how headscarves are worn have been relaxed.   2. Interact with men  Conversations and time spent with men who are not family members are limited. The majority of public buildings, including offices, banks, and universities, have separate entrances for the different sexes.  Some exceptions include hospitals and medical colleges. Public transportation, parks, beaches and amusement parks are also segregated in most parts of the country. Unlawful mixing will lead to criminal charges being brought against both parties, but women typically face harsher punishment.  3. Go for a swim  Women are not allowed to use public swimming pools available to men and can swim only in private ones or female-only gyms and spas. Women are not even allowed to look at men in swimming attire. But change is expected on this under the economic plan of the Crown Prince that will make Saudi Arabia more attractive to foreign tourist and investor.  One example of this is the current development in the Red Sea that reportedly will allow gender-mixes bathing, bikinis, and alcohol.  4. Compete freely in sports  In 2017, Saudi Arabia proposed hosting an Olympic Games without women. According to Prince Fahad bin Jalawi al-Saud, a consultant to the Saudi Olympic Committee said, “Our society can be very conservative, it has a hard time accepting that women can compete in sports.”  But in September 2017,  Saudi Arabia’s national stadium welcomed its first ever female spectators. Women were assigned their own section in the normally male-only venue to watch celebrations marking the anniversary of the founding of Saudi Arabia.  5. Try on clothes when shopping  The mere thought of a disrobed woman behind a dressing-room door is apparently too much for men to handle in Saudi Arabia. Women are also not allowed to enter the cemetery and reading an uncensored fashion magazine.  6. Marry without permission  Permission to marry must be granted by a woman's "wali" or guardian. An approval from a ministry of interior is a must for a woman who intends to marry a foreigner.  Marriage to a non-muslim is not allowed.  7. Open a Bank Account  Women are not allowed to have their personal bank account to control their finances without permission.   8. Get a fair trial  The testimony of a woman is only worth half a man’s in Saudi Arabia’s legal system. Women also only receive half the inheritance their brothers are entitled to.  Under Sharia inheritance laws, daughters receive half what is awarded to their brothers.  9.  Travel Passports and identification cards must be obtained with the permission of a male guardian. Women are usually also not allowed to leave the home alone.   10. Have custody of children In cases of divorce, women are only allowed custody of their children until they reach the age of seven for boys and nine for girls.
1. Wear clothes or makeup that "show off their beauty"

You cannot dress how you want in Saudi Arabia. "Dressing for beauty" is illegal. Modest clothing is encouraged. Full-length abayas - a long coat worn over other clothes - must be worn by all women in public, although in recent years rules over the color, decoration and how headscarves are worn have been relaxed. 
Women can vote, yes. They are also allowed to obtain a college education, play sports, enter sports stadiums and by June, they are also allowed to drive. Reportedly, Women will be able to apply for their own driving licenses even without permission from their male guardians. In spite of this, rules that govern guardianship of women continue that will restrict them from doing many things including the following;  1. Wear clothes or makeup that "show off their beauty"  You cannot dress how you want in Saudi Arabia. "Dressing for beauty" is illegal. Modest clothing is encouraged. Full-length abayas - a long coat worn over other clothes - must be worn by all women in public, although in recent years rules over the color, decoration and how headscarves are worn have been relaxed.   2. Interact with men  Conversations and time spent with men who are not family members are limited. The majority of public buildings, including offices, banks, and universities, have separate entrances for the different sexes.  Some exceptions include hospitals and medical colleges. Public transportation, parks, beaches and amusement parks are also segregated in most parts of the country. Unlawful mixing will lead to criminal charges being brought against both parties, but women typically face harsher punishment.  3. Go for a swim  Women are not allowed to use public swimming pools available to men and can swim only in private ones or female-only gyms and spas. Women are not even allowed to look at men in swimming attire. But change is expected on this under the economic plan of the Crown Prince that will make Saudi Arabia more attractive to foreign tourist and investor.  One example of this is the current development in the Red Sea that reportedly will allow gender-mixes bathing, bikinis, and alcohol.  4. Compete freely in sports  In 2017, Saudi Arabia proposed hosting an Olympic Games without women. According to Prince Fahad bin Jalawi al-Saud, a consultant to the Saudi Olympic Committee said, “Our society can be very conservative, it has a hard time accepting that women can compete in sports.”  But in September 2017,  Saudi Arabia’s national stadium welcomed its first ever female spectators. Women were assigned their own section in the normally male-only venue to watch celebrations marking the anniversary of the founding of Saudi Arabia.  5. Try on clothes when shopping  The mere thought of a disrobed woman behind a dressing-room door is apparently too much for men to handle in Saudi Arabia. Women are also not allowed to enter the cemetery and reading an uncensored fashion magazine.  6. Marry without permission  Permission to marry must be granted by a woman's "wali" or guardian. An approval from a ministry of interior is a must for a woman who intends to marry a foreigner.  Marriage to a non-muslim is not allowed.  7. Open a Bank Account  Women are not allowed to have their personal bank account to control their finances without permission.   8. Get a fair trial  The testimony of a woman is only worth half a man’s in Saudi Arabia’s legal system. Women also only receive half the inheritance their brothers are entitled to.  Under Sharia inheritance laws, daughters receive half what is awarded to their brothers.  9.  Travel Passports and identification cards must be obtained with the permission of a male guardian. Women are usually also not allowed to leave the home alone.   10. Have custody of children In cases of divorce, women are only allowed custody of their children until they reach the age of seven for boys and nine for girls.

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2. Interact with men


Conversations and time spent with men who are not family members are limited. The majority of public buildings, including offices, banks, and universities, have separate entrances for the different sexes. Some exceptions include hospitals and medical colleges. Public transportation, parks, beaches and amusement parks are also segregated in most parts of the country. Unlawful mixing will lead to criminal charges being brought against both parties, but women typically face harsher punishment.
Women can vote, yes. They are also allowed to obtain a college education, play sports, enter sports stadiums and by June, they are also allowed to drive. Reportedly, Women will be able to apply for their own driving licenses even without permission from their male guardians. In spite of this, rules that govern guardianship of women continue that will restrict them from doing many things including the following;  1. Wear clothes or makeup that "show off their beauty"  You cannot dress how you want in Saudi Arabia. "Dressing for beauty" is illegal. Modest clothing is encouraged. Full-length abayas - a long coat worn over other clothes - must be worn by all women in public, although in recent years rules over the color, decoration and how headscarves are worn have been relaxed.   2. Interact with men  Conversations and time spent with men who are not family members are limited. The majority of public buildings, including offices, banks, and universities, have separate entrances for the different sexes.  Some exceptions include hospitals and medical colleges. Public transportation, parks, beaches and amusement parks are also segregated in most parts of the country. Unlawful mixing will lead to criminal charges being brought against both parties, but women typically face harsher punishment.  3. Go for a swim  Women are not allowed to use public swimming pools available to men and can swim only in private ones or female-only gyms and spas. Women are not even allowed to look at men in swimming attire. But change is expected on this under the economic plan of the Crown Prince that will make Saudi Arabia more attractive to foreign tourist and investor.  One example of this is the current development in the Red Sea that reportedly will allow gender-mixes bathing, bikinis, and alcohol.  4. Compete freely in sports  In 2017, Saudi Arabia proposed hosting an Olympic Games without women. According to Prince Fahad bin Jalawi al-Saud, a consultant to the Saudi Olympic Committee said, “Our society can be very conservative, it has a hard time accepting that women can compete in sports.”  But in September 2017,  Saudi Arabia’s national stadium welcomed its first ever female spectators. Women were assigned their own section in the normally male-only venue to watch celebrations marking the anniversary of the founding of Saudi Arabia.  5. Try on clothes when shopping  The mere thought of a disrobed woman behind a dressing-room door is apparently too much for men to handle in Saudi Arabia. Women are also not allowed to enter the cemetery and reading an uncensored fashion magazine.  6. Marry without permission  Permission to marry must be granted by a woman's "wali" or guardian. An approval from a ministry of interior is a must for a woman who intends to marry a foreigner.  Marriage to a non-muslim is not allowed.  7. Open a Bank Account  Women are not allowed to have their personal bank account to control their finances without permission.   8. Get a fair trial  The testimony of a woman is only worth half a man’s in Saudi Arabia’s legal system. Women also only receive half the inheritance their brothers are entitled to.  Under Sharia inheritance laws, daughters receive half what is awarded to their brothers.  9.  Travel Passports and identification cards must be obtained with the permission of a male guardian. Women are usually also not allowed to leave the home alone.   10. Have custody of children In cases of divorce, women are only allowed custody of their children until they reach the age of seven for boys and nine for girls.
3. Go for a swim

Women are not allowed to use public swimming pools available to men and can swim only in private ones or female-only gyms and spas. Women are not even allowed to look at men in swimming attire. But change is expected on this under the economic plan of the Crown Prince that will make Saudi Arabia more attractive to foreign tourist and investor. One example of this is the current development in the Red Sea that reportedly will allow gender-mixes bathing, bikinis, and alcohol.
Women can vote, yes. They are also allowed to obtain a college education, play sports, enter sports stadiums and by June, they are also allowed to drive. Reportedly, Women will be able to apply for their own driving licenses even without permission from their male guardians. In spite of this, rules that govern guardianship of women continue that will restrict them from doing many things including the following;  1. Wear clothes or makeup that "show off their beauty"  You cannot dress how you want in Saudi Arabia. "Dressing for beauty" is illegal. Modest clothing is encouraged. Full-length abayas - a long coat worn over other clothes - must be worn by all women in public, although in recent years rules over the color, decoration and how headscarves are worn have been relaxed.   2. Interact with men  Conversations and time spent with men who are not family members are limited. The majority of public buildings, including offices, banks, and universities, have separate entrances for the different sexes.  Some exceptions include hospitals and medical colleges. Public transportation, parks, beaches and amusement parks are also segregated in most parts of the country. Unlawful mixing will lead to criminal charges being brought against both parties, but women typically face harsher punishment.  3. Go for a swim  Women are not allowed to use public swimming pools available to men and can swim only in private ones or female-only gyms and spas. Women are not even allowed to look at men in swimming attire. But change is expected on this under the economic plan of the Crown Prince that will make Saudi Arabia more attractive to foreign tourist and investor.  One example of this is the current development in the Red Sea that reportedly will allow gender-mixes bathing, bikinis, and alcohol.  4. Compete freely in sports  In 2017, Saudi Arabia proposed hosting an Olympic Games without women. According to Prince Fahad bin Jalawi al-Saud, a consultant to the Saudi Olympic Committee said, “Our society can be very conservative, it has a hard time accepting that women can compete in sports.”  But in September 2017,  Saudi Arabia’s national stadium welcomed its first ever female spectators. Women were assigned their own section in the normally male-only venue to watch celebrations marking the anniversary of the founding of Saudi Arabia.  5. Try on clothes when shopping  The mere thought of a disrobed woman behind a dressing-room door is apparently too much for men to handle in Saudi Arabia. Women are also not allowed to enter the cemetery and reading an uncensored fashion magazine.  6. Marry without permission  Permission to marry must be granted by a woman's "wali" or guardian. An approval from a ministry of interior is a must for a woman who intends to marry a foreigner.  Marriage to a non-muslim is not allowed.  7. Open a Bank Account  Women are not allowed to have their personal bank account to control their finances without permission.   8. Get a fair trial  The testimony of a woman is only worth half a man’s in Saudi Arabia’s legal system. Women also only receive half the inheritance their brothers are entitled to.  Under Sharia inheritance laws, daughters receive half what is awarded to their brothers.  9.  Travel Passports and identification cards must be obtained with the permission of a male guardian. Women are usually also not allowed to leave the home alone.   10. Have custody of children In cases of divorce, women are only allowed custody of their children until they reach the age of seven for boys and nine for girls.
4. Compete freely in sports

In 2017, Saudi Arabia proposed hosting an Olympic Games without women. According to Prince Fahad bin Jalawi al-Saud, a consultant to the Saudi Olympic Committee said, “Our society can be very conservative, it has a hard time accepting that women can compete in sports.”

But in September 2017, Saudi Arabia’s national stadium welcomed its first ever female spectators. Women were assigned their own section in the normally male-only venue to watch celebrations marking the anniversary of the founding of Saudi Arabia.
Women can vote, yes. They are also allowed to obtain a college education, play sports, enter sports stadiums and by June, they are also allowed to drive. Reportedly, Women will be able to apply for their own driving licenses even without permission from their male guardians. In spite of this, rules that govern guardianship of women continue that will restrict them from doing many things including the following;  1. Wear clothes or makeup that "show off their beauty"  You cannot dress how you want in Saudi Arabia. "Dressing for beauty" is illegal. Modest clothing is encouraged. Full-length abayas - a long coat worn over other clothes - must be worn by all women in public, although in recent years rules over the color, decoration and how headscarves are worn have been relaxed.   2. Interact with men  Conversations and time spent with men who are not family members are limited. The majority of public buildings, including offices, banks, and universities, have separate entrances for the different sexes.  Some exceptions include hospitals and medical colleges. Public transportation, parks, beaches and amusement parks are also segregated in most parts of the country. Unlawful mixing will lead to criminal charges being brought against both parties, but women typically face harsher punishment.  3. Go for a swim  Women are not allowed to use public swimming pools available to men and can swim only in private ones or female-only gyms and spas. Women are not even allowed to look at men in swimming attire. But change is expected on this under the economic plan of the Crown Prince that will make Saudi Arabia more attractive to foreign tourist and investor.  One example of this is the current development in the Red Sea that reportedly will allow gender-mixes bathing, bikinis, and alcohol.  4. Compete freely in sports  In 2017, Saudi Arabia proposed hosting an Olympic Games without women. According to Prince Fahad bin Jalawi al-Saud, a consultant to the Saudi Olympic Committee said, “Our society can be very conservative, it has a hard time accepting that women can compete in sports.”  But in September 2017,  Saudi Arabia’s national stadium welcomed its first ever female spectators. Women were assigned their own section in the normally male-only venue to watch celebrations marking the anniversary of the founding of Saudi Arabia.  5. Try on clothes when shopping  The mere thought of a disrobed woman behind a dressing-room door is apparently too much for men to handle in Saudi Arabia. Women are also not allowed to enter the cemetery and reading an uncensored fashion magazine.  6. Marry without permission  Permission to marry must be granted by a woman's "wali" or guardian. An approval from a ministry of interior is a must for a woman who intends to marry a foreigner.  Marriage to a non-muslim is not allowed.  7. Open a Bank Account  Women are not allowed to have their personal bank account to control their finances without permission.   8. Get a fair trial  The testimony of a woman is only worth half a man’s in Saudi Arabia’s legal system. Women also only receive half the inheritance their brothers are entitled to.  Under Sharia inheritance laws, daughters receive half what is awarded to their brothers.  9.  Travel Passports and identification cards must be obtained with the permission of a male guardian. Women are usually also not allowed to leave the home alone.   10. Have custody of children In cases of divorce, women are only allowed custody of their children until they reach the age of seven for boys and nine for girls.
5. Try on clothes when shopping

The mere thought of a disrobed woman behind a dressing-room door is apparently too much for men to handle in Saudi Arabia. Women are also not allowed to enter the cemetery and reading an uncensored fashion magazine.
Women can vote, yes. They are also allowed to obtain a college education, play sports, enter sports stadiums and by June, they are also allowed to drive. Reportedly, Women will be able to apply for their own driving licenses even without permission from their male guardians. In spite of this, rules that govern guardianship of women continue that will restrict them from doing many things including the following;  1. Wear clothes or makeup that "show off their beauty"  You cannot dress how you want in Saudi Arabia. "Dressing for beauty" is illegal. Modest clothing is encouraged. Full-length abayas - a long coat worn over other clothes - must be worn by all women in public, although in recent years rules over the color, decoration and how headscarves are worn have been relaxed.   2. Interact with men  Conversations and time spent with men who are not family members are limited. The majority of public buildings, including offices, banks, and universities, have separate entrances for the different sexes.  Some exceptions include hospitals and medical colleges. Public transportation, parks, beaches and amusement parks are also segregated in most parts of the country. Unlawful mixing will lead to criminal charges being brought against both parties, but women typically face harsher punishment.  3. Go for a swim  Women are not allowed to use public swimming pools available to men and can swim only in private ones or female-only gyms and spas. Women are not even allowed to look at men in swimming attire. But change is expected on this under the economic plan of the Crown Prince that will make Saudi Arabia more attractive to foreign tourist and investor.  One example of this is the current development in the Red Sea that reportedly will allow gender-mixes bathing, bikinis, and alcohol.  4. Compete freely in sports  In 2017, Saudi Arabia proposed hosting an Olympic Games without women. According to Prince Fahad bin Jalawi al-Saud, a consultant to the Saudi Olympic Committee said, “Our society can be very conservative, it has a hard time accepting that women can compete in sports.”  But in September 2017,  Saudi Arabia’s national stadium welcomed its first ever female spectators. Women were assigned their own section in the normally male-only venue to watch celebrations marking the anniversary of the founding of Saudi Arabia.  5. Try on clothes when shopping  The mere thought of a disrobed woman behind a dressing-room door is apparently too much for men to handle in Saudi Arabia. Women are also not allowed to enter the cemetery and reading an uncensored fashion magazine.  6. Marry without permission  Permission to marry must be granted by a woman's "wali" or guardian. An approval from a ministry of interior is a must for a woman who intends to marry a foreigner.  Marriage to a non-muslim is not allowed.  7. Open a Bank Account  Women are not allowed to have their personal bank account to control their finances without permission.   8. Get a fair trial  The testimony of a woman is only worth half a man’s in Saudi Arabia’s legal system. Women also only receive half the inheritance their brothers are entitled to.  Under Sharia inheritance laws, daughters receive half what is awarded to their brothers.  9.  Travel Passports and identification cards must be obtained with the permission of a male guardian. Women are usually also not allowed to leave the home alone.   10. Have custody of children In cases of divorce, women are only allowed custody of their children until they reach the age of seven for boys and nine for girls.
6. Marry without permission

Permission to marry must be granted by a woman's "wali" or guardian. An approval from a ministry of interior is a must for a woman who intends to marry a foreigner. Marriage to a non-muslim is not allowed.
Women can vote, yes. They are also allowed to obtain a college education, play sports, enter sports stadiums and by June, they are also allowed to drive. Reportedly, Women will be able to apply for their own driving licenses even without permission from their male guardians. In spite of this, rules that govern guardianship of women continue that will restrict them from doing many things including the following;  1. Wear clothes or makeup that "show off their beauty"  You cannot dress how you want in Saudi Arabia. "Dressing for beauty" is illegal. Modest clothing is encouraged. Full-length abayas - a long coat worn over other clothes - must be worn by all women in public, although in recent years rules over the color, decoration and how headscarves are worn have been relaxed.   2. Interact with men  Conversations and time spent with men who are not family members are limited. The majority of public buildings, including offices, banks, and universities, have separate entrances for the different sexes.  Some exceptions include hospitals and medical colleges. Public transportation, parks, beaches and amusement parks are also segregated in most parts of the country. Unlawful mixing will lead to criminal charges being brought against both parties, but women typically face harsher punishment.  3. Go for a swim  Women are not allowed to use public swimming pools available to men and can swim only in private ones or female-only gyms and spas. Women are not even allowed to look at men in swimming attire. But change is expected on this under the economic plan of the Crown Prince that will make Saudi Arabia more attractive to foreign tourist and investor.  One example of this is the current development in the Red Sea that reportedly will allow gender-mixes bathing, bikinis, and alcohol.  4. Compete freely in sports  In 2017, Saudi Arabia proposed hosting an Olympic Games without women. According to Prince Fahad bin Jalawi al-Saud, a consultant to the Saudi Olympic Committee said, “Our society can be very conservative, it has a hard time accepting that women can compete in sports.”  But in September 2017,  Saudi Arabia’s national stadium welcomed its first ever female spectators. Women were assigned their own section in the normally male-only venue to watch celebrations marking the anniversary of the founding of Saudi Arabia.  5. Try on clothes when shopping  The mere thought of a disrobed woman behind a dressing-room door is apparently too much for men to handle in Saudi Arabia. Women are also not allowed to enter the cemetery and reading an uncensored fashion magazine.  6. Marry without permission  Permission to marry must be granted by a woman's "wali" or guardian. An approval from a ministry of interior is a must for a woman who intends to marry a foreigner.  Marriage to a non-muslim is not allowed.  7. Open a Bank Account  Women are not allowed to have their personal bank account to control their finances without permission.   8. Get a fair trial  The testimony of a woman is only worth half a man’s in Saudi Arabia’s legal system. Women also only receive half the inheritance their brothers are entitled to.  Under Sharia inheritance laws, daughters receive half what is awarded to their brothers.  9.  Travel Passports and identification cards must be obtained with the permission of a male guardian. Women are usually also not allowed to leave the home alone.   10. Have custody of children In cases of divorce, women are only allowed custody of their children until they reach the age of seven for boys and nine for girls.
7. Open a Bank Account

Women are not allowed to have their personal bank account to control their finances without permission. 
Women can vote, yes. They are also allowed to obtain a college education, play sports, enter sports stadiums and by June, they are also allowed to drive. Reportedly, Women will be able to apply for their own driving licenses even without permission from their male guardians. In spite of this, rules that govern guardianship of women continue that will restrict them from doing many things including the following;  1. Wear clothes or makeup that "show off their beauty"  You cannot dress how you want in Saudi Arabia. "Dressing for beauty" is illegal. Modest clothing is encouraged. Full-length abayas - a long coat worn over other clothes - must be worn by all women in public, although in recent years rules over the color, decoration and how headscarves are worn have been relaxed.   2. Interact with men  Conversations and time spent with men who are not family members are limited. The majority of public buildings, including offices, banks, and universities, have separate entrances for the different sexes.  Some exceptions include hospitals and medical colleges. Public transportation, parks, beaches and amusement parks are also segregated in most parts of the country. Unlawful mixing will lead to criminal charges being brought against both parties, but women typically face harsher punishment.  3. Go for a swim  Women are not allowed to use public swimming pools available to men and can swim only in private ones or female-only gyms and spas. Women are not even allowed to look at men in swimming attire. But change is expected on this under the economic plan of the Crown Prince that will make Saudi Arabia more attractive to foreign tourist and investor.  One example of this is the current development in the Red Sea that reportedly will allow gender-mixes bathing, bikinis, and alcohol.  4. Compete freely in sports  In 2017, Saudi Arabia proposed hosting an Olympic Games without women. According to Prince Fahad bin Jalawi al-Saud, a consultant to the Saudi Olympic Committee said, “Our society can be very conservative, it has a hard time accepting that women can compete in sports.”  But in September 2017,  Saudi Arabia’s national stadium welcomed its first ever female spectators. Women were assigned their own section in the normally male-only venue to watch celebrations marking the anniversary of the founding of Saudi Arabia.  5. Try on clothes when shopping  The mere thought of a disrobed woman behind a dressing-room door is apparently too much for men to handle in Saudi Arabia. Women are also not allowed to enter the cemetery and reading an uncensored fashion magazine.  6. Marry without permission  Permission to marry must be granted by a woman's "wali" or guardian. An approval from a ministry of interior is a must for a woman who intends to marry a foreigner.  Marriage to a non-muslim is not allowed.  7. Open a Bank Account  Women are not allowed to have their personal bank account to control their finances without permission.   8. Get a fair trial  The testimony of a woman is only worth half a man’s in Saudi Arabia’s legal system. Women also only receive half the inheritance their brothers are entitled to.  Under Sharia inheritance laws, daughters receive half what is awarded to their brothers.  9.  Travel Passports and identification cards must be obtained with the permission of a male guardian. Women are usually also not allowed to leave the home alone.   10. Have custody of children In cases of divorce, women are only allowed custody of their children until they reach the age of seven for boys and nine for girls.
8. Get a fair trial

The testimony of a woman is only worth half a man’s in Saudi Arabia’s legal system. Women also only receive half the inheritance their brothers are entitled to. Under Sharia inheritance laws, daughters receive half what is awarded to their brothers.
Women can vote, yes. They are also allowed to obtain a college education, play sports, enter sports stadiums and by June, they are also allowed to drive. Reportedly, Women will be able to apply for their own driving licenses even without permission from their male guardians. In spite of this, rules that govern guardianship of women continue that will restrict them from doing many things including the following;  1. Wear clothes or makeup that "show off their beauty"  You cannot dress how you want in Saudi Arabia. "Dressing for beauty" is illegal. Modest clothing is encouraged. Full-length abayas - a long coat worn over other clothes - must be worn by all women in public, although in recent years rules over the color, decoration and how headscarves are worn have been relaxed.   2. Interact with men  Conversations and time spent with men who are not family members are limited. The majority of public buildings, including offices, banks, and universities, have separate entrances for the different sexes.  Some exceptions include hospitals and medical colleges. Public transportation, parks, beaches and amusement parks are also segregated in most parts of the country. Unlawful mixing will lead to criminal charges being brought against both parties, but women typically face harsher punishment.  3. Go for a swim  Women are not allowed to use public swimming pools available to men and can swim only in private ones or female-only gyms and spas. Women are not even allowed to look at men in swimming attire. But change is expected on this under the economic plan of the Crown Prince that will make Saudi Arabia more attractive to foreign tourist and investor.  One example of this is the current development in the Red Sea that reportedly will allow gender-mixes bathing, bikinis, and alcohol.  4. Compete freely in sports  In 2017, Saudi Arabia proposed hosting an Olympic Games without women. According to Prince Fahad bin Jalawi al-Saud, a consultant to the Saudi Olympic Committee said, “Our society can be very conservative, it has a hard time accepting that women can compete in sports.”  But in September 2017,  Saudi Arabia’s national stadium welcomed its first ever female spectators. Women were assigned their own section in the normally male-only venue to watch celebrations marking the anniversary of the founding of Saudi Arabia.  5. Try on clothes when shopping  The mere thought of a disrobed woman behind a dressing-room door is apparently too much for men to handle in Saudi Arabia. Women are also not allowed to enter the cemetery and reading an uncensored fashion magazine.  6. Marry without permission  Permission to marry must be granted by a woman's "wali" or guardian. An approval from a ministry of interior is a must for a woman who intends to marry a foreigner.  Marriage to a non-muslim is not allowed.  7. Open a Bank Account  Women are not allowed to have their personal bank account to control their finances without permission.   8. Get a fair trial  The testimony of a woman is only worth half a man’s in Saudi Arabia’s legal system. Women also only receive half the inheritance their brothers are entitled to.  Under Sharia inheritance laws, daughters receive half what is awarded to their brothers.  9.  Travel Passports and identification cards must be obtained with the permission of a male guardian. Women are usually also not allowed to leave the home alone.   10. Have custody of children In cases of divorce, women are only allowed custody of their children until they reach the age of seven for boys and nine for girls.
9. Travel

Passports and identification cards must be obtained with the permission of a male guardian. Women are usually also not allowed to leave the home alone. 
Women can vote, yes. They are also allowed to obtain a college education, play sports, enter sports stadiums and by June, they are also allowed to drive. Reportedly, Women will be able to apply for their own driving licenses even without permission from their male guardians. In spite of this, rules that govern guardianship of women continue that will restrict them from doing many things including the following;  1. Wear clothes or makeup that "show off their beauty"  You cannot dress how you want in Saudi Arabia. "Dressing for beauty" is illegal. Modest clothing is encouraged. Full-length abayas - a long coat worn over other clothes - must be worn by all women in public, although in recent years rules over the color, decoration and how headscarves are worn have been relaxed.   2. Interact with men  Conversations and time spent with men who are not family members are limited. The majority of public buildings, including offices, banks, and universities, have separate entrances for the different sexes.  Some exceptions include hospitals and medical colleges. Public transportation, parks, beaches and amusement parks are also segregated in most parts of the country. Unlawful mixing will lead to criminal charges being brought against both parties, but women typically face harsher punishment.  3. Go for a swim  Women are not allowed to use public swimming pools available to men and can swim only in private ones or female-only gyms and spas. Women are not even allowed to look at men in swimming attire. But change is expected on this under the economic plan of the Crown Prince that will make Saudi Arabia more attractive to foreign tourist and investor.  One example of this is the current development in the Red Sea that reportedly will allow gender-mixes bathing, bikinis, and alcohol.  4. Compete freely in sports  In 2017, Saudi Arabia proposed hosting an Olympic Games without women. According to Prince Fahad bin Jalawi al-Saud, a consultant to the Saudi Olympic Committee said, “Our society can be very conservative, it has a hard time accepting that women can compete in sports.”  But in September 2017,  Saudi Arabia’s national stadium welcomed its first ever female spectators. Women were assigned their own section in the normally male-only venue to watch celebrations marking the anniversary of the founding of Saudi Arabia.  5. Try on clothes when shopping  The mere thought of a disrobed woman behind a dressing-room door is apparently too much for men to handle in Saudi Arabia. Women are also not allowed to enter the cemetery and reading an uncensored fashion magazine.  6. Marry without permission  Permission to marry must be granted by a woman's "wali" or guardian. An approval from a ministry of interior is a must for a woman who intends to marry a foreigner.  Marriage to a non-muslim is not allowed.  7. Open a Bank Account  Women are not allowed to have their personal bank account to control their finances without permission.   8. Get a fair trial  The testimony of a woman is only worth half a man’s in Saudi Arabia’s legal system. Women also only receive half the inheritance their brothers are entitled to.  Under Sharia inheritance laws, daughters receive half what is awarded to their brothers.  9.  Travel Passports and identification cards must be obtained with the permission of a male guardian. Women are usually also not allowed to leave the home alone.   10. Have custody of children In cases of divorce, women are only allowed custody of their children until they reach the age of seven for boys and nine for girls.
10. Have custody of children

In cases of divorce, women are only allowed custody of their children until they reach the age of seven for boys and nine for girls.

Women can vote, yes. They are also allowed to obtain a college education, play sports, enter sports stadiums and by June, they are also allowed to drive. Reportedly, Women will be able to apply for their own driving licenses even without permission from their male guardians. In spite of this, rules that govern guardianship of women continue that will restrict them from doing many things including the following;  1. Wear clothes or makeup that "show off their beauty"  You cannot dress how you want in Saudi Arabia. "Dressing for beauty" is illegal. Modest clothing is encouraged. Full-length abayas - a long coat worn over other clothes - must be worn by all women in public, although in recent years rules over the color, decoration and how headscarves are worn have been relaxed.   2. Interact with men  Conversations and time spent with men who are not family members are limited. The majority of public buildings, including offices, banks, and universities, have separate entrances for the different sexes.  Some exceptions include hospitals and medical colleges. Public transportation, parks, beaches and amusement parks are also segregated in most parts of the country. Unlawful mixing will lead to criminal charges being brought against both parties, but women typically face harsher punishment.  3. Go for a swim  Women are not allowed to use public swimming pools available to men and can swim only in private ones or female-only gyms and spas. Women are not even allowed to look at men in swimming attire. But change is expected on this under the economic plan of the Crown Prince that will make Saudi Arabia more attractive to foreign tourist and investor.  One example of this is the current development in the Red Sea that reportedly will allow gender-mixes bathing, bikinis, and alcohol.  4. Compete freely in sports  In 2017, Saudi Arabia proposed hosting an Olympic Games without women. According to Prince Fahad bin Jalawi al-Saud, a consultant to the Saudi Olympic Committee said, “Our society can be very conservative, it has a hard time accepting that women can compete in sports.”  But in September 2017,  Saudi Arabia’s national stadium welcomed its first ever female spectators. Women were assigned their own section in the normally male-only venue to watch celebrations marking the anniversary of the founding of Saudi Arabia.  5. Try on clothes when shopping  The mere thought of a disrobed woman behind a dressing-room door is apparently too much for men to handle in Saudi Arabia. Women are also not allowed to enter the cemetery and reading an uncensored fashion magazine.  6. Marry without permission  Permission to marry must be granted by a woman's "wali" or guardian. An approval from a ministry of interior is a must for a woman who intends to marry a foreigner.  Marriage to a non-muslim is not allowed.  7. Open a Bank Account  Women are not allowed to have their personal bank account to control their finances without permission.   8. Get a fair trial  The testimony of a woman is only worth half a man’s in Saudi Arabia’s legal system. Women also only receive half the inheritance their brothers are entitled to.  Under Sharia inheritance laws, daughters receive half what is awarded to their brothers.  9.  Travel Passports and identification cards must be obtained with the permission of a male guardian. Women are usually also not allowed to leave the home alone.   10. Have custody of children In cases of divorce, women are only allowed custody of their children until they reach the age of seven for boys and nine for girls.
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Saudi Arabia is still one of the top destinations of Overseas Filipino Workers (OFW), especially for skilled workers. To manage expatriate or foreign hiring in the kingdom, the government is using Iqama also known as a residence permit. This permit is being issued to all expatriate who arrived in Saudi Arabia on an employment visa.

There are many changes taking place in Saudi Arabia especially for women this 2018! Women can now watch a sports event, can drive in June, allowed to watch concerts and other entertainment with other men and so on.

Overseas Filipino Workers (OFWs) need to save while earning big from working abroad. As OFWs, saving money for an emergency, for our family's future or for our retirement is important. Opening a savings account in a bank that you trust and gives value to your money will inspire you to save more. Bayani OFW Savings from Sterling Bank of Asia is a savings account that comes with no maintaining balance and for as low as P2,000 pesos in your account, your money with grow with interest.

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