Sponsored Links
SEARCH THIS SITE
SEARCH THIS SITE FOR HOUSE DESIGN, OVERSEAS FILIPINO NEWS, FREE ONLINE STUDIES, CASH LOANS and BANK LOANS, PROPERTY FOR SALE, HOUSE AND LOT, FORECLOSED, CARS FOR SALE and anything beneficial for the Filipinos at home and abroad
Advertisement

Thursday, November 09, 2017

Too much Listening to Christmas Songs Could Damage Your Mental Health


With the Philippines having the longest countdown to the holiday season, it’s no wonder that public places all over the country endlessly play festive tunes to ring in the most wonderful time of the year.  But according to one study, hearing Christmas songs on repeat may damage your mental health, especially if you work in these public places playing the songs, and you are forced to tune them out, a psychologist pointed out.  “Because if they don’t [tune the songs out,] it really does make you unable to focus on anything else. You’re simply spending all your energy trying not to hear what you’re hearing,” clinical psychologist Linda Blair told Sky News. Blair added that music “goes right into our emotions immediately and it bypasses rationality,” in relation to why some stores would play Christmas songs while shoppers shop for gifts.  Sponsored Links  It might make us feel that we’re trapped — it’s a reminder that we have to buy presents, cater for people, organize celebrations. Some people will react to that by making impulse purchases, which the retailer likes. Others might just walk out of the shop. It’s a risk,” she added. However, Blair’s idea has been backed up before in 2012 by Dr. Victoria Williamson, who is a researcher for the psychology of music at Goldsmiths, University of London. Williamson told NBC News about the “mere exposure effect,” which relates the act of listening to music, to how people would react from it. It eventually makes people like these songs due to constant exposure. Meanwhile, as long as it is the Christmas season in the Philippines, people will have to either enjoy these tunes or, as the expert said, tune them out
Philippines has the longest holiday season countdown. It starts on very first day of the "ber" months. That's when you will start to hear Christmas songs over the airwaves.
Advertisements



But a study said hearing Christmas songs repeatedly can be damaging to your mental health, especially those who work in public places where the songs are being played and you are forced to tune them out, a psychologist pointed out.

hilippines has the longest holiday season countdown. It starts on very first day of the "ber" months. That's when you will start to hear Christmas songs over the airwaves. Advertisements    But a study said hearing Christmas songs repeatedly can be damaging to your mental health, especially those who work in public places where the songs are being played and you are forced to tune them out, a psychologist pointed out.    Sponsored Links  Blair’s idea, however, has been backed up even in 2012 by a psychology of music researcher Dr. Victoria Williamson at Goldsmiths, University of London. Williamson told NBC News about the “mere exposure effect,” which relates the act of listening to music, to how people would react from it. It eventually makes people like these songs due to constant exposure. As the Christmas season comes people in the Philippines, will have to either enjoy these tunes as they always do or as the expert said, tune them out.  Source: Inquirer Advertisement Read More:     ©2017 THOUGHTSKOTO

Sponsored Links

hilippines has the longest holiday season countdown. It starts on very first day of the "ber" months. That's when you will start to hear Christmas songs over the airwaves. Advertisements    But a study said hearing Christmas songs repeatedly can be damaging to your mental health, especially those who work in public places where the songs are being played and you are forced to tune them out, a psychologist pointed out.    Sponsored Links  Blair’s idea, however, has been backed up even in 2012 by a psychology of music researcher Dr. Victoria Williamson at Goldsmiths, University of London. Williamson told NBC News about the “mere exposure effect,” which relates the act of listening to music, to how people would react from it. It eventually makes people like these songs due to constant exposure. As the Christmas season comes people in the Philippines, will have to either enjoy these tunes as they always do or as the expert said, tune them out.  Source: Inquirer Advertisement Read More:     ©2017 THOUGHTSKOTO
Blair’s idea, however, has been backed up even in 2012 by a psychology of music researcher Dr. Victoria Williamson at Goldsmiths, University of London.
Williamson told NBC News about the “mere exposure effect,” which relates the act of listening to music, to how people would react from it. It eventually makes people like these songs due to constant exposure.
As the Christmas season comes people in the Philippines, will have to either enjoy these tunes as they always do or as the expert said, tune them out.

Source: Inquirer
Advertisement

Read More:




©2017 THOUGHTSKOTO

SEARCH JBSOLIS, TYPE KEYWORDS and TITLE OF ARTICLE at the box below