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Wednesday, November 15, 2017

Expats Facing Difficulties In Obtaining Saudi Licenses

Expatriates who want to put up a business in Saudi Arabia is now facing difficulties in establishing a legal way due to the stiff regulations in the kingdom.  The alternative way to start a business in Saudi Arabia without the need of a kafeel is through the Saudi Arabian General Investment Authority (SAGIA) where it is become the sponsor of expats who wish to start a business.  According to Ali Shah, CEO of business-consulting firms ASCS and VRS, there are many reasons the government does not allow expatriates to set up their businesses legally. “One of the major reasons is the influence the 'free' presence of foreign entities of different scales may have on the traditions, culture, social structure or even security of the Kingdom,” Shah said. Shah said Saudi society is nonetheless being compromised because of the ever-increasing population of expatriates. He suggests that a regulated and well-monitored system of allowing expatriates to run their businesses can legally be implemented. The Foreign Investment Law further states that SAGIA is responsible for granting a foreign investment license to foreign investors. “Allowing expatriates to set up businesses legally on their own will definitely add to the economy,” says Shah. “The only harm I can see is the entrance of undesirable crime-oriented entities, but that can be countered through effective law enforcement and intelligence.” Sponsored Links Expatriates residing in the Kingdom claim that the government should pay attention to the foreigners who have been already living in the country for several years. “I believe they should be given the opportunity to buy homes and have some sort of a permanent residence free of sponsorship that leads to citizenship based on track record,” said Shah. Paul Gamble, chief economist and head of research at Jadwa Investments, assumes the government does not allow expatriates to set up their businesses legally because it could undermine the position of locally owned businesses. “There is no reason that foreign-owned business would harm the Saudi economy,” says Gamble. “If it is a good business – one that generates products and services that are better than, cheaper than or different to those already available – then everyone benefits. Foreigners may choose to transfer more of their profits abroad, but if their business is successful they may prefer to invest more in the Kingdom. They will face the same restrictions on hiring foreign labor as locally owned firms.” Many expatriates from countries like Egypt and Syria demand investing in the Kingdom rather than back at home due to the revolutions. Shah says it is a good opportunity for Saudi Arabia to attract such investors if the main focus is on reduction of unemployment and contribution to the market. “If this privilege is given, monitors and regulations also have to be set up to protect everyone's rights,” said Shah. “In the case of Syria, I think they should be given any and every concession and privilege possible under the current conditions.” “The Kingdom has proven to be one of the most stable investment destinations in the region,” said Gamble. “It also has one of the strongest and best performing economies. It is therefore an attractive opportunity for investors from across the region.” “The original policy of SAGIA to allow any expatriate should be brought back, and in fact, the umbrella of SAGIA should get much bigger and accommodate expatriates that have been here a long time,” says Shah. He adds, “The condition that they leave on exit-only does not help. This will totally resolve the Saudization issue if a major condition is for businesses to train and hire locals.”
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Expatriates who want to put up a business in Saudi Arabia is now facing difficulties in establishing a legal way due to the stiff regulations in the kingdom.

The alternative way to start a business in Saudi Arabia without the need of a kafeel is through the Saudi Arabian General Investment Authority (SAGIA) where it is become the sponsor of expats who wish to start a business.


Expatriates who want to put up a business in Saudi Arabia is now facing difficulties in establishing a legal way due to the stiff regulations in the kingdom.  The alternative way to start a business in Saudi Arabia without the need of a kafeel is through the Saudi Arabian General Investment Authority (SAGIA) where it is become the sponsor of expats who wish to start a business.  According to Ali Shah, CEO of business-consulting firms ASCS and VRS, there are many reasons the government does not allow expatriates to set up their businesses legally. “One of the major reasons is the influence the 'free' presence of foreign entities of different scales may have on the traditions, culture, social structure or even security of the Kingdom,” Shah said. Shah said Saudi society is nonetheless being compromised because of the ever-increasing population of expatriates. He suggests that a regulated and well-monitored system of allowing expatriates to run their businesses can legally be implemented. The Foreign Investment Law further states that SAGIA is responsible for granting a foreign investment license to foreign investors. “Allowing expatriates to set up businesses legally on their own will definitely add to the economy,” says Shah. “The only harm I can see is the entrance of undesirable crime-oriented entities, but that can be countered through effective law enforcement and intelligence.” Sponsored Links Expatriates residing in the Kingdom claim that the government should pay attention to the foreigners who have been already living in the country for several years. “I believe they should be given the opportunity to buy homes and have some sort of a permanent residence free of sponsorship that leads to citizenship based on track record,” said Shah. Paul Gamble, chief economist and head of research at Jadwa Investments, assumes the government does not allow expatriates to set up their businesses legally because it could undermine the position of locally owned businesses. “There is no reason that foreign-owned business would harm the Saudi economy,” says Gamble. “If it is a good business – one that generates products and services that are better than, cheaper than or different to those already available – then everyone benefits. Foreigners may choose to transfer more of their profits abroad, but if their business is successful they may prefer to invest more in the Kingdom. They will face the same restrictions on hiring foreign labor as locally owned firms.” Many expatriates from countries like Egypt and Syria demand investing in the Kingdom rather than back at home due to the revolutions. Shah says it is a good opportunity for Saudi Arabia to attract such investors if the main focus is on reduction of unemployment and contribution to the market. “If this privilege is given, monitors and regulations also have to be set up to protect everyone's rights,” said Shah. “In the case of Syria, I think they should be given any and every concession and privilege possible under the current conditions.” “The Kingdom has proven to be one of the most stable investment destinations in the region,” said Gamble. “It also has one of the strongest and best performing economies. It is therefore an attractive opportunity for investors from across the region.” “The original policy of SAGIA to allow any expatriate should be brought back, and in fact, the umbrella of SAGIA should get much bigger and accommodate expatriates that have been here a long time,” says Shah. He adds, “The condition that they leave on exit-only does not help. This will totally resolve the Saudization issue if a major condition is for businesses to train and hire locals.”
Ali Shah, CEO of business-consulting firms ASCS and VRS, said that there are numerous reasons why the government does not allow expatriates to set up their businesses legally.
Expatriates who want to put up a business in Saudi Arabia is now facing difficulties in establishing a legal way due to the stiff regulations in the kingdom.  The alternative way to start a business in Saudi Arabia without the need of a kafeel is through the Saudi Arabian General Investment Authority (SAGIA) where it is become the sponsor of expats who wish to start a business.  According to Ali Shah, CEO of business-consulting firms ASCS and VRS, there are many reasons the government does not allow expatriates to set up their businesses legally. “One of the major reasons is the influence the 'free' presence of foreign entities of different scales may have on the traditions, culture, social structure or even security of the Kingdom,” Shah said. Shah said Saudi society is nonetheless being compromised because of the ever-increasing population of expatriates. He suggests that a regulated and well-monitored system of allowing expatriates to run their businesses can legally be implemented. The Foreign Investment Law further states that SAGIA is responsible for granting a foreign investment license to foreign investors. “Allowing expatriates to set up businesses legally on their own will definitely add to the economy,” says Shah. “The only harm I can see is the entrance of undesirable crime-oriented entities, but that can be countered through effective law enforcement and intelligence.” Sponsored Links Expatriates residing in the Kingdom claim that the government should pay attention to the foreigners who have been already living in the country for several years. “I believe they should be given the opportunity to buy homes and have some sort of a permanent residence free of sponsorship that leads to citizenship based on track record,” said Shah. Paul Gamble, chief economist and head of research at Jadwa Investments, assumes the government does not allow expatriates to set up their businesses legally because it could undermine the position of locally owned businesses. “There is no reason that foreign-owned business would harm the Saudi economy,” says Gamble. “If it is a good business – one that generates products and services that are better than, cheaper than or different to those already available – then everyone benefits. Foreigners may choose to transfer more of their profits abroad, but if their business is successful they may prefer to invest more in the Kingdom. They will face the same restrictions on hiring foreign labor as locally owned firms.” Many expatriates from countries like Egypt and Syria demand investing in the Kingdom rather than back at home due to the revolutions. Shah says it is a good opportunity for Saudi Arabia to attract such investors if the main focus is on reduction of unemployment and contribution to the market. “If this privilege is given, monitors and regulations also have to be set up to protect everyone's rights,” said Shah. “In the case of Syria, I think they should be given any and every concession and privilege possible under the current conditions.” “The Kingdom has proven to be one of the most stable investment destinations in the region,” said Gamble. “It also has one of the strongest and best performing economies. It is therefore an attractive opportunity for investors from across the region.” “The original policy of SAGIA to allow any expatriate should be brought back, and in fact, the umbrella of SAGIA should get much bigger and accommodate expatriates that have been here a long time,” says Shah. He adds, “The condition that they leave on exit-only does not help. This will totally resolve the Saudization issue if a major condition is for businesses to train and hire locals.”

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The expats who are already living in the kingdom has been clamoring for attention and consideration from the government to allow them to buy properties and permanent residencies outside sponsorship that leads to citizenship based on their track record.
Chief economist, Paul Gamble assumes that the reason behind government not allowing expats to do businesses legally is that it could undermine the position of locally owned businesses.
Expatriates who want to put up a business in Saudi Arabia is now facing difficulties in establishing a legal way due to the stiff regulations in the kingdom.  The alternative way to start a business in Saudi Arabia without the need of a kafeel is through the Saudi Arabian General Investment Authority (SAGIA) where it is become the sponsor of expats who wish to start a business.  According to Ali Shah, CEO of business-consulting firms ASCS and VRS, there are many reasons the government does not allow expatriates to set up their businesses legally. “One of the major reasons is the influence the 'free' presence of foreign entities of different scales may have on the traditions, culture, social structure or even security of the Kingdom,” Shah said. Shah said Saudi society is nonetheless being compromised because of the ever-increasing population of expatriates. He suggests that a regulated and well-monitored system of allowing expatriates to run their businesses can legally be implemented. The Foreign Investment Law further states that SAGIA is responsible for granting a foreign investment license to foreign investors. “Allowing expatriates to set up businesses legally on their own will definitely add to the economy,” says Shah. “The only harm I can see is the entrance of undesirable crime-oriented entities, but that can be countered through effective law enforcement and intelligence.” Sponsored Links Expatriates residing in the Kingdom claim that the government should pay attention to the foreigners who have been already living in the country for several years. “I believe they should be given the opportunity to buy homes and have some sort of a permanent residence free of sponsorship that leads to citizenship based on track record,” said Shah. Paul Gamble, chief economist and head of research at Jadwa Investments, assumes the government does not allow expatriates to set up their businesses legally because it could undermine the position of locally owned businesses. “There is no reason that foreign-owned business would harm the Saudi economy,” says Gamble. “If it is a good business – one that generates products and services that are better than, cheaper than or different to those already available – then everyone benefits. Foreigners may choose to transfer more of their profits abroad, but if their business is successful they may prefer to invest more in the Kingdom. They will face the same restrictions on hiring foreign labor as locally owned firms.” Many expatriates from countries like Egypt and Syria demand investing in the Kingdom rather than back at home due to the revolutions. Shah says it is a good opportunity for Saudi Arabia to attract such investors if the main focus is on reduction of unemployment and contribution to the market. “If this privilege is given, monitors and regulations also have to be set up to protect everyone's rights,” said Shah. “In the case of Syria, I think they should be given any and every concession and privilege possible under the current conditions.” “The Kingdom has proven to be one of the most stable investment destinations in the region,” said Gamble. “It also has one of the strongest and best performing economies. It is therefore an attractive opportunity for investors from across the region.” “The original policy of SAGIA to allow any expatriate should be brought back, and in fact, the umbrella of SAGIA should get much bigger and accommodate expatriates that have been here a long time,” says Shah. He adds, “The condition that they leave on exit-only does not help. This will totally resolve the Saudization issue if a major condition is for businesses to train and hire locals.”
Many expatriates from countries like Egypt and Syria demand investing in the Kingdom rather than back at their own countries due insurgencies.
However, Shah suggests that it is a good opportunity for Saudi Arabia to invite such investors if they really want to reduce unemployment and contribute to the market.

Saudi Arabia has been proven to be the most stable investment venue in the Gulf, nonetheless, the strongest and best performing economies in the GCC. Allowing expatriates to invest and do business could boost its economy further.

SAGIA's  original policy is to allow any expatriate to do legal businesses and it should be brought back. SAGIA should consider expats who are living at the kingdom for a very long time.
 “The condition that they leave on exit-only does not help. This will totally resolve the Saudization issue if a major condition is for businesses to train and hire locals,” Shah added.
Source: Arab News
Expatriates who want to put up a business in Saudi Arabia is now facing difficulties in establishing a legal way due to the stiff regulations in the kingdom.  The alternative way to start a business in Saudi Arabia without the need of a kafeel is through the Saudi Arabian General Investment Authority (SAGIA) where it is become the sponsor of expats who wish to start a business.  According to Ali Shah, CEO of business-consulting firms ASCS and VRS, there are many reasons the government does not allow expatriates to set up their businesses legally. “One of the major reasons is the influence the 'free' presence of foreign entities of different scales may have on the traditions, culture, social structure or even security of the Kingdom,” Shah said. Shah said Saudi society is nonetheless being compromised because of the ever-increasing population of expatriates. He suggests that a regulated and well-monitored system of allowing expatriates to run their businesses can legally be implemented. The Foreign Investment Law further states that SAGIA is responsible for granting a foreign investment license to foreign investors. “Allowing expatriates to set up businesses legally on their own will definitely add to the economy,” says Shah. “The only harm I can see is the entrance of undesirable crime-oriented entities, but that can be countered through effective law enforcement and intelligence.” Sponsored Links Expatriates residing in the Kingdom claim that the government should pay attention to the foreigners who have been already living in the country for several years. “I believe they should be given the opportunity to buy homes and have some sort of a permanent residence free of sponsorship that leads to citizenship based on track record,” said Shah. Paul Gamble, chief economist and head of research at Jadwa Investments, assumes the government does not allow expatriates to set up their businesses legally because it could undermine the position of locally owned businesses. “There is no reason that foreign-owned business would harm the Saudi economy,” says Gamble. “If it is a good business – one that generates products and services that are better than, cheaper than or different to those already available – then everyone benefits. Foreigners may choose to transfer more of their profits abroad, but if their business is successful they may prefer to invest more in the Kingdom. They will face the same restrictions on hiring foreign labor as locally owned firms.” Many expatriates from countries like Egypt and Syria demand investing in the Kingdom rather than back at home due to the revolutions. Shah says it is a good opportunity for Saudi Arabia to attract such investors if the main focus is on reduction of unemployment and contribution to the market. “If this privilege is given, monitors and regulations also have to be set up to protect everyone's rights,” said Shah. “In the case of Syria, I think they should be given any and every concession and privilege possible under the current conditions.” “The Kingdom has proven to be one of the most stable investment destinations in the region,” said Gamble. “It also has one of the strongest and best performing economies. It is therefore an attractive opportunity for investors from across the region.” “The original policy of SAGIA to allow any expatriate should be brought back, and in fact, the umbrella of SAGIA should get much bigger and accommodate expatriates that have been here a long time,” says Shah. He adds, “The condition that they leave on exit-only does not help. This will totally resolve the Saudization issue if a major condition is for businesses to train and hire locals.”
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