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Friday, October 13, 2017

System For Migrant Labor In The Philippines; A Model For Southeast Asia—World Bank


The World Bank lauded the Philippines’ support system for its overseas Filipino workers (OFWs) as a model for other Southeast Asian countries.  It is a proof that the government is doing the right thing in pressing forward with the bold and far-sighted program that began under the government of President Ferdinand Marcos during the 1970s.  Other Asean members can adopt the Philippine support system for its migrant workers, the World Bank (WB) said, as it called on easing restrictions on labor migration to boost workers’ welfare and accelerate regional economic integration.  “The highly developed support system for migrant labor in the Philippines can serve as a model for other countries. The country, however, should continue its focus on improving reintegration of returning migrants,” said a World Bank report, titled “Migrating to Opportunity”, released on Monday.  It cited the Philippines as a good example of migration systems with “clearly defined institutional responsibilities”.  The report said several migrant-focused agencies are housed mostly within the Department of Labor and Employment (DOLE).  Their roles and responsibilities are well defined, with the Philippine Overseas Employment Administration responsible mainly for managing migration and the Overseas Workers Welfare Administration responsible mainly for protecting migrants.  To build on this status, the World Bank said the Philippines should continue to evaluate and improve its migration management system, including oversight of recruitment agencies, programs for returned migrants, and data sharing and interoperability.  Sponsored Links The World Bank report also underscored the need to relax migration procedures across the Asean region, as migration is expected to increase with the regional economic integration.  The Asean Economic Community, which was launched in 2015, aims to promote the free mobility of professionals and skilled workers within the region.  The report said barriers, such as costly and lengthy recruitment processes, restrictive quotas on the number of foreign workers allowed in a country, and rigid employment policies constrain workers’ employment options and impact their welfare.  “No matter where workers wish to migrate in Asean, they face mobility costs several times the annual average wage. Improvements in the migration process can ease these costs on prospective migrants, and help countries respond better to their labor market needs,” said Mauro Testaverde, World Bank economist for the Social Protection and Jobs Global Practice and the lead author of the report.  The report noted the impact of labor mobility on the region’s economies can be significant, as migration could provide individuals from lower-income countries with the opportunity to increase their incomes.  About $62 billion in remittances were sent to Asean countries in 2015. Remittances account for 10 percent of gross domestic product (GDP) in the Philippines, 7 percent in Vietnam, 5 percent in Myanmar, and 3 percent in Cambodia.  Testaverde further said better policies can lower the barriers to labor mobility, noting some of these include improving the governance of the migration system, reforming domestic policies, and balancing protection and economic development in the migration process.  Source: Business Mirror
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The World Bank lauded the Philippines’ support system for its overseas Filipino workers (OFWs) as a model for other Southeast Asian countries.

It is a proof that the government is doing the right thing in pressing forward with the bold and far-sighted program that began under the government of President Ferdinand Marcos during the 1970s.

World Bank (WB) said that other Asean member neighboring countries can adopt the Philippine support system for Overseas Filipino Workers (OFWs) ,  on easing restrictions on labor migration to boost workers’ welfare and accelerate regional economic integration.

The World Bank cited the Philippines as a model of migration systems with “clearly defined institutional responsibilities”.

The roles and responsibilities of the agencies are well defined, with the Philippine Overseas Employment Administration (POEA)  manages and regulates the deployment of migrant workers and the Overseas Workers Welfare Administration (OWWA) responsible mainly for the welfare and protection of OFWs.

However, the World Bank said the Philippines should continue to evaluate and improve its migration management system, including oversight of recruitment agencies, programs for returned migrants, and data sharing and interoperability to further build and improve this status.
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The Asean Economic Community, launched in 2015, aims to promote the free mobility of professionals and skilled workers within ASEAN but barriers, such as costly and lengthy recruitment processes, restrictive quotas on the number of foreign workers allowed in a country, and rigid employment policies hinder migrant workers’ employment opportunities and affect their chance of earning bigger.
In 2015, about $62 billion in remittances were sent to Asean countries. Remittances from OFWs comprises 10 percent of gross domestic product (GDP) in the Philippines keeping the economy afloat, much higher compared to neighboring countries in Asia like  Vietnam (7%), Myanmar (7%), and Cambodia (3%).

Testaverde also added that better policies can lower the barriers to labor mobility, noting some of these include improving the governance of the migration system, reforming domestic policies, and balancing protection and economic development in the migration process.
The World Bank lauded the Philippines’ support system for its overseas Filipino workers (OFWs) as a model for other Southeast Asian countries.  It is a proof that the government is doing the right thing in pressing forward with the bold and far-sighted program that began under the government of President Ferdinand Marcos during the 1970s.  Other Asean members can adopt the Philippine support system for its migrant workers, the World Bank (WB) said, as it called on easing restrictions on labor migration to boost workers’ welfare and accelerate regional economic integration.  “The highly developed support system for migrant labor in the Philippines can serve as a model for other countries. The country, however, should continue its focus on improving reintegration of returning migrants,” said a World Bank report, titled “Migrating to Opportunity”, released on Monday.  It cited the Philippines as a good example of migration systems with “clearly defined institutional responsibilities”.  The report said several migrant-focused agencies are housed mostly within the Department of Labor and Employment (DOLE).  Their roles and responsibilities are well defined, with the Philippine Overseas Employment Administration responsible mainly for managing migration and the Overseas Workers Welfare Administration responsible mainly for protecting migrants.  To build on this status, the World Bank said the Philippines should continue to evaluate and improve its migration management system, including oversight of recruitment agencies, programs for returned migrants, and data sharing and interoperability.  Sponsored Links The World Bank report also underscored the need to relax migration procedures across the Asean region, as migration is expected to increase with the regional economic integration.  The Asean Economic Community, which was launched in 2015, aims to promote the free mobility of professionals and skilled workers within the region.  The report said barriers, such as costly and lengthy recruitment processes, restrictive quotas on the number of foreign workers allowed in a country, and rigid employment policies constrain workers’ employment options and impact their welfare.  “No matter where workers wish to migrate in Asean, they face mobility costs several times the annual average wage. Improvements in the migration process can ease these costs on prospective migrants, and help countries respond better to their labor market needs,” said Mauro Testaverde, World Bank economist for the Social Protection and Jobs Global Practice and the lead author of the report.  The report noted the impact of labor mobility on the region’s economies can be significant, as migration could provide individuals from lower-income countries with the opportunity to increase their incomes.  About $62 billion in remittances were sent to Asean countries in 2015. Remittances account for 10 percent of gross domestic product (GDP) in the Philippines, 7 percent in Vietnam, 5 percent in Myanmar, and 3 percent in Cambodia.  Testaverde further said better policies can lower the barriers to labor mobility, noting some of these include improving the governance of the migration system, reforming domestic policies, and balancing protection and economic development in the migration process.  Source: Business Mirror

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