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Tuesday, October 17, 2017

Hong Kong Film Maker Made A Documentary About A Filipina Domestic Worker Who Helped Raise Him

large percentage of Filipina domestic workers can be found in Hong Kong.  According to Association of Hong Kong Agencies (AHKA) data, the number of documented Filipina domestic workers in the region reached almost about 200,000 as of January 2017. This list does not include the undocumented ones. They are mothers who left their own children and household to take care of someone else's home and kids for the promise of better earnings. They don't care if they are being humiliated or discriminated. All they know is that they are doing the sacrifice for the betterment of the future of their family back home.    Sponsored Links Justin Baggio Cheung, 23, said he had long taken an interest in the working conditions of domestic workers in Hong Kong. Living with Filipina nanny around, he grew up with her guidance and care.  Teresita Lauang, now aged 64, arrived in Cheung’s home when he was only one month and two weeks old, having left her two children back in the Philippines.   READ: Bringing Back the OFWs Home, Still Top Priority Of The Duterte Gov't   Justin is a son of Hong Kong film director Alfred Cheung Kin-ting. He has finished editing a documentary that tackles the condition of domestic workers in Hong Kong.  Most of them were experiencing racism and discrimination. Yes, even in a Hong Kong textbook, the portrayal of a Filipino is just lowly domestic helpers.  Justin realized that they are more than domestic workers and how most people in Hong Kong treat them is very wrong. It just need to end somehow or at least make them realize their value as human being.  We just hope that somehow this documentary would open the minds of the employers of the domestic workers, not only in Hong Kong but to every part of the world, to treat them well. They are house helpers, not slaves and they never deserve to be treated wrongly, realizing their contribution to instill values in the minds of the young children they are taking care of. Advertisement Read More:          ©2017 THOUGHTSKOTO
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A large percentage of Filipina domestic workers can be found in Hong Kong. 

According to Association of Hong Kong Agencies (AHKA) data, the number of documented Filipina domestic workers in the region reached almost about 200,000 as of January 2017. This list does not include the undocumented ones.
They are mothers who left their own children and household to take care of someone else's home and kids for the promise of better earnings. They don't care if they are being humiliated or discriminated. All they know is that they are doing the sacrifice for the betterment of the future of their family back home. 
large percentage of Filipina domestic workers can be found in Hong Kong.  According to Association of Hong Kong Agencies (AHKA) data, the number of documented Filipina domestic workers in the region reached almost about 200,000 as of January 2017. This list does not include the undocumented ones. They are mothers who left their own children and household to take care of someone else's home and kids for the promise of better earnings. They don't care if they are being humiliated or discriminated. All they know is that they are doing the sacrifice for the betterment of the future of their family back home.    Sponsored Links Justin Baggio Cheung, 23, said he had long taken an interest in the working conditions of domestic workers in Hong Kong. Living with Filipina nanny around, he grew up with her guidance and care.  Teresita Lauang, now aged 64, arrived in Cheung’s home when he was only one month and two weeks old, having left her two children back in the Philippines.   READ: Bringing Back the OFWs Home, Still Top Priority Of The Duterte Gov't   Justin is a son of Hong Kong film director Alfred Cheung Kin-ting. He has finished editing a documentary that tackles the condition of domestic workers in Hong Kong.  Most of them were experiencing racism and discrimination. Yes, even in a Hong Kong textbook, the portrayal of a Filipino is just lowly domestic helpers.  Justin realized that they are more than domestic workers and how most people in Hong Kong treat them is very wrong. It just need to end somehow or at least make them realize their value as human being.  We just hope that somehow this documentary would open the minds of the employers of the domestic workers, not only in Hong Kong but to every part of the world, to treat them well. They are house helpers, not slaves and they never deserve to be treated wrongly, realizing their contribution to instill values in the minds of the young children they are taking care of. Advertisement Read More:          ©2017 THOUGHTSKOTO

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Justin Baggio Cheung, 23, said he had long taken an interest in the working conditions of domestic workers in Hong Kong. Living with Filipina nanny around, he grew up with her guidance and care.
large percentage of Filipina domestic workers can be found in Hong Kong.  According to Association of Hong Kong Agencies (AHKA) data, the number of documented Filipina domestic workers in the region reached almost about 200,000 as of January 2017. This list does not include the undocumented ones. They are mothers who left their own children and household to take care of someone else's home and kids for the promise of better earnings. They don't care if they are being humiliated or discriminated. All they know is that they are doing the sacrifice for the betterment of the future of their family back home.    Sponsored Links Justin Baggio Cheung, 23, said he had long taken an interest in the working conditions of domestic workers in Hong Kong. Living with Filipina nanny around, he grew up with her guidance and care.  Teresita Lauang, now aged 64, arrived in Cheung’s home when he was only one month and two weeks old, having left her two children back in the Philippines.   READ: Bringing Back the OFWs Home, Still Top Priority Of The Duterte Gov't   Justin is a son of Hong Kong film director Alfred Cheung Kin-ting. He has finished editing a documentary that tackles the condition of domestic workers in Hong Kong.  Most of them were experiencing racism and discrimination. Yes, even in a Hong Kong textbook, the portrayal of a Filipino is just lowly domestic helpers.  Justin realized that they are more than domestic workers and how most people in Hong Kong treat them is very wrong. It just need to end somehow or at least make them realize their value as human being.  We just hope that somehow this documentary would open the minds of the employers of the domestic workers, not only in Hong Kong but to every part of the world, to treat them well. They are house helpers, not slaves and they never deserve to be treated wrongly, realizing their contribution to instill values in the minds of the young children they are taking care of. Advertisement Read More:          ©2017 THOUGHTSKOTO
Teresita Lauang, now aged 64, arrived in Cheung’s home when he was only one month and two weeks old, having left her two children back in the Philippines.large percentage of Filipina domestic workers can be found in Hong Kong.  According to Association of Hong Kong Agencies (AHKA) data, the number of documented Filipina domestic workers in the region reached almost about 200,000 as of January 2017. This list does not include the undocumented ones. They are mothers who left their own children and household to take care of someone else's home and kids for the promise of better earnings. They don't care if they are being humiliated or discriminated. All they know is that they are doing the sacrifice for the betterment of the future of their family back home.    Sponsored Links Justin Baggio Cheung, 23, said he had long taken an interest in the working conditions of domestic workers in Hong Kong. Living with Filipina nanny around, he grew up with her guidance and care.  Teresita Lauang, now aged 64, arrived in Cheung’s home when he was only one month and two weeks old, having left her two children back in the Philippines.   READ: Bringing Back the OFWs Home, Still Top Priority Of The Duterte Gov't   Justin is a son of Hong Kong film director Alfred Cheung Kin-ting. He has finished editing a documentary that tackles the condition of domestic workers in Hong Kong.  Most of them were experiencing racism and discrimination. Yes, even in a Hong Kong textbook, the portrayal of a Filipino is just lowly domestic helpers.  Justin realized that they are more than domestic workers and how most people in Hong Kong treat them is very wrong. It just need to end somehow or at least make them realize their value as human being.  We just hope that somehow this documentary would open the minds of the employers of the domestic workers, not only in Hong Kong but to every part of the world, to treat them well. They are house helpers, not slaves and they never deserve to be treated wrongly, realizing their contribution to instill values in the minds of the young children they are taking care of. Advertisement Read More:          ©2017 THOUGHTSKOTO
large percentage of Filipina domestic workers can be found in Hong Kong.  According to Association of Hong Kong Agencies (AHKA) data, the number of documented Filipina domestic workers in the region reached almost about 200,000 as of January 2017. This list does not include the undocumented ones. They are mothers who left their own children and household to take care of someone else's home and kids for the promise of better earnings. They don't care if they are being humiliated or discriminated. All they know is that they are doing the sacrifice for the betterment of the future of their family back home.    Sponsored Links Justin Baggio Cheung, 23, said he had long taken an interest in the working conditions of domestic workers in Hong Kong. Living with Filipina nanny around, he grew up with her guidance and care.  Teresita Lauang, now aged 64, arrived in Cheung’s home when he was only one month and two weeks old, having left her two children back in the Philippines.   READ: Bringing Back the OFWs Home, Still Top Priority Of The Duterte Gov't   Justin is a son of Hong Kong film director Alfred Cheung Kin-ting. He has finished editing a documentary that tackles the condition of domestic workers in Hong Kong.  Most of them were experiencing racism and discrimination. Yes, even in a Hong Kong textbook, the portrayal of a Filipino is just lowly domestic helpers.  Justin realized that they are more than domestic workers and how most people in Hong Kong treat them is very wrong. It just need to end somehow or at least make them realize their value as human being.  We just hope that somehow this documentary would open the minds of the employers of the domestic workers, not only in Hong Kong but to every part of the world, to treat them well. They are house helpers, not slaves and they never deserve to be treated wrongly, realizing their contribution to instill values in the minds of the young children they are taking care of. Advertisement Read More:          ©2017 THOUGHTSKOTO
Justin is a son of Hong Kong film director Alfred Cheung Kin-ting. He has finished editing a documentary that tackles the condition of domestic workers in Hong Kong.

Most of them were experiencing racism and discrimination. Yes, even in a Hong Kong textbook, the portrayal of a Filipino is just lowly domestic helpers.
large percentage of Filipina domestic workers can be found in Hong Kong.  According to Association of Hong Kong Agencies (AHKA) data, the number of documented Filipina domestic workers in the region reached almost about 200,000 as of January 2017. This list does not include the undocumented ones. They are mothers who left their own children and household to take care of someone else's home and kids for the promise of better earnings. They don't care if they are being humiliated or discriminated. All they know is that they are doing the sacrifice for the betterment of the future of their family back home.    Sponsored Links Justin Baggio Cheung, 23, said he had long taken an interest in the working conditions of domestic workers in Hong Kong. Living with Filipina nanny around, he grew up with her guidance and care.  Teresita Lauang, now aged 64, arrived in Cheung’s home when he was only one month and two weeks old, having left her two children back in the Philippines.   READ: Bringing Back the OFWs Home, Still Top Priority Of The Duterte Gov't   Justin is a son of Hong Kong film director Alfred Cheung Kin-ting. He has finished editing a documentary that tackles the condition of domestic workers in Hong Kong.  Most of them were experiencing racism and discrimination. Yes, even in a Hong Kong textbook, the portrayal of a Filipino is just lowly domestic helpers.  Justin realized that they are more than domestic workers and how most people in Hong Kong treat them is very wrong. It just need to end somehow or at least make them realize their value as human being.  We just hope that somehow this documentary would open the minds of the employers of the domestic workers, not only in Hong Kong but to every part of the world, to treat them well. They are house helpers, not slaves and they never deserve to be treated wrongly, realizing their contribution to instill values in the minds of the young children they are taking care of. Advertisement Read More:          ©2017 THOUGHTSKOTO
Justin realized that they are more than domestic workers and how most people in Hong Kong treat them is very wrong. It just need to end somehow or at least make them realize their value as human being.
large percentage of Filipina domestic workers can be found in Hong Kong.  According to Association of Hong Kong Agencies (AHKA) data, the number of documented Filipina domestic workers in the region reached almost about 200,000 as of January 2017. This list does not include the undocumented ones. They are mothers who left their own children and household to take care of someone else's home and kids for the promise of better earnings. They don't care if they are being humiliated or discriminated. All they know is that they are doing the sacrifice for the betterment of the future of their family back home.    Sponsored Links Justin Baggio Cheung, 23, said he had long taken an interest in the working conditions of domestic workers in Hong Kong. Living with Filipina nanny around, he grew up with her guidance and care.  Teresita Lauang, now aged 64, arrived in Cheung’s home when he was only one month and two weeks old, having left her two children back in the Philippines.   READ: Bringing Back the OFWs Home, Still Top Priority Of The Duterte Gov't   Justin is a son of Hong Kong film director Alfred Cheung Kin-ting. He has finished editing a documentary that tackles the condition of domestic workers in Hong Kong.  Most of them were experiencing racism and discrimination. Yes, even in a Hong Kong textbook, the portrayal of a Filipino is just lowly domestic helpers.  Justin realized that they are more than domestic workers and how most people in Hong Kong treat them is very wrong. It just need to end somehow or at least make them realize their value as human being.  We just hope that somehow this documentary would open the minds of the employers of the domestic workers, not only in Hong Kong but to every part of the world, to treat them well. They are house helpers, not slaves and they never deserve to be treated wrongly, realizing their contribution to instill values in the minds of the young children they are taking care of. Advertisement Read More:          ©2017 THOUGHTSKOTO

Cheung is planning a special screening in Hong Kong in December, and expects the film to be seen in local schools and international film festivals.

“I want to show it at schools to make people aware that it is easy to dehumanise someone when you don’t know their back story,” he said.

“I also hope this film can create a legacy for her. I want my kids to know that it wasn’t just my dad, my mum … but there was also this other person, although she never appears in the family photos.”


We just hope that somehow this documentary would open the minds of the employers of the domestic workers, not only in Hong Kong but to every part of the world, to treat them well. They are house helpers, not slaves and they never deserve to be treated wrongly, realizing their contribution to instill values in the minds of the young children they are taking care of.
Source: SCMP
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