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Monday, May 15, 2017

OFW On Death Row in Jeddah KSA To Undergo Second Psychiatric Checkup

In the latest news about Filipino Workers on Death Row in Saudi Arabia, Regour de Padua, 39, a driver in Jeddah who was sentenced to death by beheading received some sort of reprieve when the Summary Court (Trial Court) in Jeddah decided to send de Padua to a second psychiatric checkup before passing its sentence.   In November 2008, “Reno” stole a 55-seater bus from the premises of Saudia catering in the Khalidiya District. He drove wildly for two hours, hitting cars everywhere he went.  Investigations showed that De Padua was not himself the day before after receiving a letter from his fiancee. He knocked on the door of his colleague at work in the early hours of the next day, holding a hammer in his hand, but his colleague shut the door. De Padua went outside and broke the glass of his boss’ car, and then stole the bus with up to twelve passengers still on board. He was reported to be shouting "If no Filipino speaks to me now, I’m going to crash the bus!"  The passengers pleaded with him to stop, which he briefly did, giving the 12 enough time to jump from the windows. Three were injured in their falls, one requiring hospital attention.   De Padua proceeded toward the Haramain Highway he was spotted by police, but he ignored their warnings for him to stop and a 120 kmph-pursuit into oncoming traffic ensued in which at least 18 vehicles were hit. The speeding collided with a Toyota Corolla, killing the Saudi family and a Bangladesh expat.   After about a year of deliberations, the court decided to send the accused to Shihar hospital, a mental hospital in Taif, to have a second psychiatric checkup. This is after the lawyers of the defendant, appointed by the Philippine Embassy, presented new medical reports which said the accused was suffering from a mental and psychological illness. The medical report says that he began to show signs of changes in behavior after receiving a letter from his fiancee informing him of her desire to end their relationship. It said de Padua has been refusing food and failing to cooperate with doctors, leading them to resort to force-feeding him via a tube inserted in his nose.  The attorney general and the families of the deceased continued to demand capital punishment for the culprit. Mohammed Ayed Al-Qarni, a 70-year-old Saudi citizen, lost his wife, son and daughter in the accident. He said he is anxiously waiting for the death penalty for the driver. He hoped that he would live until he saw the driver executed.   A former circuit court called for the execution of the driver for carelessly killing Saad Mohammed Ayed Al-Qarni, his sister Salmah and his mother Ayedah Awad Al-Omari in addition to Waheed Daud Miyah, a Bangladeshi national. The circuit court also ruled that the driver pay the blood money of SR250,000 to the families of the victims.  The Court of Appeals rejected the verdict based on medical reports which said the driver was mentally ill. It sent the case back to the Summary Court. In 2016, Saudi Arabia executed a total of 153 prisoners from breaking Strict Sharia laws. Saudi courts appear to recognize that under limited circumstances, a person who does not have mental awareness of the consequences of his acts is not criminally responsible beyond payment of compensation. Those who are aware of the bad consequences of their acts but unable to control their behavior due to insanity might not be excepted from mandatory punishments but can be excepted from discretionary punishments. Those who are insane but could be argued to have the ability to control their actions might not be excused from capital punishment. The extent to which an individual’s judgment is compromised by his mental illness is a question that is left to the courts to determine, and not all individuals with mental illnesses are excluded from the death penalty.



In the latest news about Filipino Workers on Death Row in Saudi Arabia, Regour de Padua, 39, a driver in Jeddah who was sentenced to death by beheading received some sort of reprieve when the Summary Court (Trial Court) in Jeddah decided to send de Padua to a second psychiatric checkup before passing its sentence.

In the latest news about Filipino Workers on Death Row in Saudi Arabia, Regour de Padua, 39, a driver in Jeddah who was sentenced to death by beheading received some sort of reprieve when the Summary Court (Trial Court) in Jeddah decided to send de Padua to a second psychiatric checkup before passing its sentence.   In November 2008, “Reno” stole a 55-seater bus from the premises of Saudia catering in the Khalidiya District. He drove wildly for two hours, hitting cars everywhere he went.  Investigations showed that De Padua was not himself the day before after receiving a letter from his fiancee. He knocked on the door of his colleague at work in the early hours of the next day, holding a hammer in his hand, but his colleague shut the door. De Padua went outside and broke the glass of his boss’ car, and then stole the bus with up to twelve passengers still on board. He was reported to be shouting "If no Filipino speaks to me now, I’m going to crash the bus!"  The passengers pleaded with him to stop, which he briefly did, giving the 12 enough time to jump from the windows. Three were injured in their falls, one requiring hospital attention.   De Padua proceeded toward the Haramain Highway he was spotted by police, but he ignored their warnings for him to stop and a 120 kmph-pursuit into oncoming traffic ensued in which at least 18 vehicles were hit. The speeding collided with a Toyota Corolla, killing the Saudi family and a Bangladesh expat.   After about a year of deliberations, the court decided to send the accused to Shihar hospital, a mental hospital in Taif, to have a second psychiatric checkup. This is after the lawyers of the defendant, appointed by the Philippine Embassy, presented new medical reports which said the accused was suffering from a mental and psychological illness. The medical report says that he began to show signs of changes in behavior after receiving a letter from his fiancee informing him of her desire to end their relationship. It said de Padua has been refusing food and failing to cooperate with doctors, leading them to resort to force-feeding him via a tube inserted in his nose.  The attorney general and the families of the deceased continued to demand capital punishment for the culprit. Mohammed Ayed Al-Qarni, a 70-year-old Saudi citizen, lost his wife, son and daughter in the accident. He said he is anxiously waiting for the death penalty for the driver. He hoped that he would live until he saw the driver executed.   A former circuit court called for the execution of the driver for carelessly killing Saad Mohammed Ayed Al-Qarni, his sister Salmah and his mother Ayedah Awad Al-Omari in addition to Waheed Daud Miyah, a Bangladeshi national. The circuit court also ruled that the driver pay the blood money of SR250,000 to the families of the victims.  The Court of Appeals rejected the verdict based on medical reports which said the driver was mentally ill. It sent the case back to the Summary Court. In 2016, Saudi Arabia executed a total of 153 prisoners from breaking Strict Sharia laws. Saudi courts appear to recognize that under limited circumstances, a person who does not have mental awareness of the consequences of his acts is not criminally responsible beyond payment of compensation. Those who are aware of the bad consequences of their acts but unable to control their behavior due to insanity might not be excepted from mandatory punishments but can be excepted from discretionary punishments. Those who are insane but could be argued to have the ability to control their actions might not be excused from capital punishment. The extent to which an individual’s judgment is compromised by his mental illness is a question that is left to the courts to determine, and not all individuals with mental illnesses are excluded from the death penalty.
Regour de Padua, the OFW on death row

In November 2008, “Reno” stole a 55-seater bus from the premises of Saudia catering in the Khalidiya District. He drove wildly for two hours, hitting cars everywhere he went.

 De Padua proceeded toward the Haramain Highway he was spotted by police, but he ignored their warnings for him to stop and a 120 kmph-pursuit into oncoming traffic ensued in which at least 18 vehicles were hit. The speeding collided with a Toyota Corolla, killing the Saudi family and a Bangladesh expat.


In the latest news about Filipino Workers on Death Row in Saudi Arabia, Regour de Padua, 39, a driver in Jeddah who was sentenced to death by beheading received some sort of reprieve when the Summary Court (Trial Court) in Jeddah decided to send de Padua to a second psychiatric checkup before passing its sentence.   In November 2008, “Reno” stole a 55-seater bus from the premises of Saudia catering in the Khalidiya District. He drove wildly for two hours, hitting cars everywhere he went.  Investigations showed that De Padua was not himself the day before after receiving a letter from his fiancee. He knocked on the door of his colleague at work in the early hours of the next day, holding a hammer in his hand, but his colleague shut the door. De Padua went outside and broke the glass of his boss’ car, and then stole the bus with up to twelve passengers still on board. He was reported to be shouting "If no Filipino speaks to me now, I’m going to crash the bus!"  The passengers pleaded with him to stop, which he briefly did, giving the 12 enough time to jump from the windows. Three were injured in their falls, one requiring hospital attention.   De Padua proceeded toward the Haramain Highway he was spotted by police, but he ignored their warnings for him to stop and a 120 kmph-pursuit into oncoming traffic ensued in which at least 18 vehicles were hit. The speeding collided with a Toyota Corolla, killing the Saudi family and a Bangladesh expat.   After about a year of deliberations, the court decided to send the accused to Shihar hospital, a mental hospital in Taif, to have a second psychiatric checkup. This is after the lawyers of the defendant, appointed by the Philippine Embassy, presented new medical reports which said the accused was suffering from a mental and psychological illness. The medical report says that he began to show signs of changes in behavior after receiving a letter from his fiancee informing him of her desire to end their relationship. It said de Padua has been refusing food and failing to cooperate with doctors, leading them to resort to force-feeding him via a tube inserted in his nose.  The attorney general and the families of the deceased continued to demand capital punishment for the culprit. Mohammed Ayed Al-Qarni, a 70-year-old Saudi citizen, lost his wife, son and daughter in the accident. He said he is anxiously waiting for the death penalty for the driver. He hoped that he would live until he saw the driver executed.   A former circuit court called for the execution of the driver for carelessly killing Saad Mohammed Ayed Al-Qarni, his sister Salmah and his mother Ayedah Awad Al-Omari in addition to Waheed Daud Miyah, a Bangladeshi national. The circuit court also ruled that the driver pay the blood money of SR250,000 to the families of the victims.  The Court of Appeals rejected the verdict based on medical reports which said the driver was mentally ill. It sent the case back to the Summary Court. In 2016, Saudi Arabia executed a total of 153 prisoners from breaking Strict Sharia laws. Saudi courts appear to recognize that under limited circumstances, a person who does not have mental awareness of the consequences of his acts is not criminally responsible beyond payment of compensation. Those who are aware of the bad consequences of their acts but unable to control their behavior due to insanity might not be excepted from mandatory punishments but can be excepted from discretionary punishments. Those who are insane but could be argued to have the ability to control their actions might not be excused from capital punishment. The extent to which an individual’s judgment is compromised by his mental illness is a question that is left to the courts to determine, and not all individuals with mental illnesses are excluded from the death penalty.
The scene of the crash with the stolen bus and the police cars. Reno de Padua is seen being arrested.



Investigations showed that De Padua was not himself the day before after receiving a letter from his fiancee. He knocked on the door of his colleague at work in the early hours of the next day, holding a hammer in his hand, but his colleague shut the door. De Padua went outside and broke the glass of his boss’ car, and then stole the bus with up to twelve passengers still on board. He was reported to be shouting "If no Filipino speaks to me now, I’m going to crash the bus!"

The passengers pleaded with him to stop, which he briefly did, giving the 12 enough time to jump from the windows. Three were injured in their falls, one requiring hospital attention.




After about a year of deliberations, the court decided to send the accused to Shihar hospital, a mental hospital in Taif, to have a second psychiatric checkup. This is after the lawyers of the defendant, appointed by the Philippine Embassy, presented new medical reports which said the accused was suffering from a mental and psychological illness. The medical report says that he began to show signs of changes in behavior after receiving a letter from his fiancee informing him of her desire to end their relationship. It said de Padua has been refusing food and failing to cooperate with doctors, leading them to resort to force-feeding him via a tube inserted in his nose.

The attorney general and the families of the deceased continued to demand capital punishment for the culprit. Mohammed Ayed Al-Qarni, a 70-year-old Saudi citizen, lost his wife, son and daughter in the accident. He said he is anxiously waiting for the death penalty for the driver. He hoped that he would live until he saw the driver executed.


In the latest news about Filipino Workers on Death Row in Saudi Arabia, Regour de Padua, 39, a driver in Jeddah who was sentenced to death by beheading received some sort of reprieve when the Summary Court (Trial Court) in Jeddah decided to send de Padua to a second psychiatric checkup before passing its sentence.   In November 2008, “Reno” stole a 55-seater bus from the premises of Saudia catering in the Khalidiya District. He drove wildly for two hours, hitting cars everywhere he went.  Investigations showed that De Padua was not himself the day before after receiving a letter from his fiancee. He knocked on the door of his colleague at work in the early hours of the next day, holding a hammer in his hand, but his colleague shut the door. De Padua went outside and broke the glass of his boss’ car, and then stole the bus with up to twelve passengers still on board. He was reported to be shouting "If no Filipino speaks to me now, I’m going to crash the bus!"  The passengers pleaded with him to stop, which he briefly did, giving the 12 enough time to jump from the windows. Three were injured in their falls, one requiring hospital attention.   De Padua proceeded toward the Haramain Highway he was spotted by police, but he ignored their warnings for him to stop and a 120 kmph-pursuit into oncoming traffic ensued in which at least 18 vehicles were hit. The speeding collided with a Toyota Corolla, killing the Saudi family and a Bangladesh expat.   After about a year of deliberations, the court decided to send the accused to Shihar hospital, a mental hospital in Taif, to have a second psychiatric checkup. This is after the lawyers of the defendant, appointed by the Philippine Embassy, presented new medical reports which said the accused was suffering from a mental and psychological illness. The medical report says that he began to show signs of changes in behavior after receiving a letter from his fiancee informing him of her desire to end their relationship. It said de Padua has been refusing food and failing to cooperate with doctors, leading them to resort to force-feeding him via a tube inserted in his nose.  The attorney general and the families of the deceased continued to demand capital punishment for the culprit. Mohammed Ayed Al-Qarni, a 70-year-old Saudi citizen, lost his wife, son and daughter in the accident. He said he is anxiously waiting for the death penalty for the driver. He hoped that he would live until he saw the driver executed.   A former circuit court called for the execution of the driver for carelessly killing Saad Mohammed Ayed Al-Qarni, his sister Salmah and his mother Ayedah Awad Al-Omari in addition to Waheed Daud Miyah, a Bangladeshi national. The circuit court also ruled that the driver pay the blood money of SR250,000 to the families of the victims.  The Court of Appeals rejected the verdict based on medical reports which said the driver was mentally ill. It sent the case back to the Summary Court. In 2016, Saudi Arabia executed a total of 153 prisoners from breaking Strict Sharia laws. Saudi courts appear to recognize that under limited circumstances, a person who does not have mental awareness of the consequences of his acts is not criminally responsible beyond payment of compensation. Those who are aware of the bad consequences of their acts but unable to control their behavior due to insanity might not be excepted from mandatory punishments but can be excepted from discretionary punishments. Those who are insane but could be argued to have the ability to control their actions might not be excused from capital punishment. The extent to which an individual’s judgment is compromised by his mental illness is a question that is left to the courts to determine, and not all individuals with mental illnesses are excluded from the death penalty.
Mohammed Ayed Al-Qarni, Father and husband of the victims.
A former circuit court called for the execution of the driver for carelessly killing Saad Mohammed Ayed Al-Qarni, his sister Salmah and his mother Ayedah Awad Al-Omari in addition to Waheed Daud Miyah, a Bangladeshi national. The circuit court also ruled that the driver pay the blood money of SR250,000 to the families of the victims.

The Court of Appeals rejected the verdict based on medical reports which said the driver was mentally ill. It sent the case back to the Summary Court.

In 2016, Saudi Arabia executed a total of 153 prisoners from breaking Strict Sharia laws.

Saudi courts appear to recognize that under limited circumstances, a person who does not have mental awareness of the consequences of his acts is not criminally responsible beyond payment of compensation. Those who are aware of the bad consequences of their acts but unable to control their behavior due to insanity might not be excepted from mandatory punishments but can be excepted from discretionary punishments. Those who are insane but could be argued to have the ability to control their actions might not be excused from capital punishment. The extent to which an individual’s judgment is compromised by his mental illness is a question that is left to the courts to determine, and not all individuals with mental illnesses are excluded from the death penalty.








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